Diversity Visa (DV-2016) Lottery Announced

October 1, 2014

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV-2016 random lottery will be accepted from noon (EDT) Wednesday, October 1, 2014 through noon (EST) Monday, November 3, 2014. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. Early entry is recommended and they strongly encourage applicants not to wait until the last week of the registration period to enter!

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. Please check the “INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2016 DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM (DV-2016)” for the complete list of countries/areas whose natives are eligible for DV-2016.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam. Also, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible.

Eligibility
To enter the DV lottery, you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible; you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2016 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience. For more information about qualifying work experience for the principal DV applicant, see the Frequently Asked Questions which are included in the instructions.

Do not submit an entry to the DV program unless you meet both of these requirements.

Detailed Diversity Visa Program: DV-2016 Instructions

Note: If you submit more than one entry you will be disqualified.


Source of Information:
Travel.State.Gov, Current Year - Visa News

DOS, 9/29/14, Press Release: 2016 Diversity Visa Program Registration


USCIS Warning: Watch out for Diversity Visa Program Fraud

October 29, 2013

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has sent out an email warning the public to watch out for possible fraud during the FY2015 Diversity Visa (DV) Program. They warned that scammers may try to pose as U.S. government officials, trying to deceive applicants and possibly trying to take their money and private information. They warned DV applicants to only interact with the U.S. Department of State (DOS). Applicants should visit https://www.dvlottery.state.gov/ for official U.S. government information on the program.

DOS began taking online registration for the FY2015 Diversity Visa Program on 10/1/13. The registration period will end on Saturday, 11/2/13. Again, please visit https://www.dvlottery.state.gov/ for official U.S. government information on the program and more details.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13102251 (Posted 10/22/13)

U.S. Department of State, Electronic Diversity Visa Lottery, Web Page:
https://www.dvlottery.state.gov/

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Avoid Scams, Web Page:
http://www.uscis.gov/avoidscams

Diversity Visa (DV-2015) Lottery Announced

September 20, 2013

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV-2015 random lottery will be accepted from noon (EDT) Tuesday, October 1, 2013 through noon (EDT) Saturday, November 2, 2013. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. Early entry is recommended and they strongly encourage applicants not to wait until the last week of the registration period to enter!

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. Please check the “INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2015 DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM (DV-2015)” for the complete list of countries/areas whose natives are eligible for DV-2015.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam. Also, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible. A notable change in eligibility for DV-2015, natives of Nigeria are no longer eligible.

Eligibility
To enter the DV lottery, you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible; you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2015 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience. For more information about qualifying work experience for the principal DV applicant, see the Frequently Asked Questions which are included in the instructions.

Do not submit an entry to the DV program unless you meet both of these requirements.

Detailed Diversity Visa Program: DV-2015 Instructions

Note: If you submit more than one entry you will be disqualified.


Source of Information: Travel.State.Gov, Current Year - Visa News

2014 Diversity Visa Lottery (DV-2014) results are now available

May 3, 2013

As of May 1st, the results of the 2014 Diversity Visa Lottery (DV-2014) are now available. If you applied for the DV-2014 lottery, you can now check your status online. You must check online, no confirmation emails will be sent by the Department of State (DOS) or anyone else. The Entrant Status Check for DV-2014 applicants will remain open until September 30, 2013. Each year, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through this computer-generated random lottery drawing.

SCAM Alert: Learn how to spot and report Diversity Visa lottery scams.

Source of Information:

"AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13050142 (posted - 5/1/13)"

Travel.state.gov, web page: Diversity Visa (DV) Program

Diversity Visa 2014 (DV-2014) Program is now closed

November 7, 2012

Registration for DV-2014 is now closed - additional entries cannot be accepted. Online registration for the DV-2014 Program began on Tuesday, October 2, 2012 at 12:00 noon, Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) (GMT-4), and concluded on Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 12:00 noon, Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) (GMT-4). DV-2014 entrants will be able to check the status of their entries as of May 1, 2013 through Entrant Status Check (ESC) on the E-DV website. See the Diversity Visa Program Instructions webpage for the DV 2014 Instructions and any available translations.

If qualified, you will be able to apply next year for DV-2015!

Source: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 12110543 (posted 11/5/12)"

APPLY TODAY for the 2014 Diversity Visa Lottery (DV-2014) – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 2, 2012

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV-2014 random lottery will be accepted Tuesday, October 2, 2012 through Saturday, November 3, 2012. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. Early entry is recommended and they strongly encourage applicants not to wait until the last week of the registration period to enter!

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. Please check the INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2014 DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM (DV-2014)” for the complete list of countries/areas whose natives are eligible for DV-2014.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam. Persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible.

Changes in eligibility this year: FOR DV-2014, NATIVES OF GUATEMALA ARE NOW ELIGIBLE FOR SELECTION.

To enter the DV lottery, you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible; you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2014 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

A registered entry that complies with submission instructions will result in a confirmation screen
containing your name and a unique confirmation number. You must print this confirmation screen for
your records using the print function of your web browser and ensure that you retain your confirmation
number. Starting May 1, 2013, you will be able to check the status of your DV-2014 entry by
returning to www.dvlottery.state.gov, clicking on Entrant Status Check, and entering your
unique confirmation number and personal information. Entrant Status Check will be the sole
means of informing you of your selection for DV-2014, providing instructions to you on how to
proceed with your application, and notifying you of your appointment for your immigrant visa
interview. Therefore, it is essential you retain your confirmation number.

Diversity Visa Program Scam Alert

September 26, 2012

The Department of State is warning the public that there has been an increase in fraudulent emails and letters being sent to Diversity Visa applicants. Some of these scammers are posing as the U.S. government and attempting to have payments sent directly to them. Diversity applicants should review the, “INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2014 DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM (DV-2014)” to know what to expect when applying for the program.

Note: Fees for the DV application process are paid to the U.S. Embassy or consulate cashier at the time of your scheduled appointment. The U.S. government will never ask you to send payment in advance by check, money order, or wire transfer.

For further details read the two Alerts:

U.S. Department of State Fraud Warning
- Scam Alert: Diversity Visa Program Scammers Sending Fraudulent Emails and Letters

FTC Consumer Alert
- How to Recognize a Diversity Visa Lottery Scam

Diversity Visa (DV-2014) Lottery - APPLY BEGINNING October 2, 2012 – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

September 25, 2012

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV-2014 random lottery will be accepted Tuesday, October 2, 2012 through Saturday, November 3, 2012. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. Early entry is recommended and they strongly encourage applicants not to wait until the last week of the registration period to enter!

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. Please check the INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2014 DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM (DV-2014)” for the complete list of countries/areas whose natives are eligible for DV-2014.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam. Persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible.

Changes in eligibility this year: FOR DV-2014, NATIVES OF GUATEMALA ARE NOW ELIGIBLE FOR SELECTION.

To enter the DV lottery, you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible; you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2014 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 17, 2012

August 13, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 17, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 30, 2012

March 26, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 30th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, March 16, 2012

March 16, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Does the time on my H-1B visa start the day that is approved or when I first enter the U.S. using it?

Answer #1
The six year period begins to accrue when you first enter the U.S. on a valid H-1B nonimmigrant visa. Your I-94 card will be stamped to reflect the date you arrived.


Question #2 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
If I did not use all six years on my previous H-1B visa, can I use the remaining years now?

Answer #2
Yes, if you have time remaining on your H-1B nonimmigrant visa status and have applied for the visa within the past six years, you are not subject to the H-1B numerical cap and are able to apply to use those remaining years now if you have an employer willing to sponsor you for your employment in the Specialty Occupation.


Question #3 – Tourist Visa
How do I provide proof of return if I have gone home after being on a tourist visa?

Answer #3
When you exit the United States, you hand over your I-94, Arrival-Departure Document. When you enter your home country, your passport is stamped with the date of your arrival. This passport stamp serves as proof of your return to your home country.


Question #4 – Student Visa (F1)
Should I apply for a student visa before or after I am accepted to an institution in the U.S.? And approximately how much time should be in between when I apply for the visa and when I plan on coming to the States?

Answer #4
You should apply for a student visa after you are accepted into an SEVP certified institution in the United States. The School will assist you in completing the necessary paperwork and obtaining the appropriate papers (Form I-20) for you to obtain your student visa, enter the U.S. and begin your education in the U.S. Students are encouraged to apply for their visa early to provide ample time for visa processing. Students should note that Embassies and Consulates are able to issue your student visa 120 days or less, in advance of the course of study registration date. Students should be advised of the Department of Homeland Security regulation which requires that all initial or beginning students enter the U.S. 30 days or less in advance of the course of study start/report date as shown on the Form I-20.


Question #5 – Tourist Visa
When applying for a tourist visa, do I use a travel agent or a lawyer?

Answer #5
When applying for a tourist visa, we recommend that you utilize the services of an Experienced Immigration Attorney.


Question #6 – Student Visa (F1)
What is the SEVIS system?

Answer #6
According to the Department of State (DOS): The Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) is designed to help the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and DOS better monitor school and exchange programs and F, M and J category visitors. Exchange visitor and student information is maintained in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). SEVIS is an Internet-based system that maintains accurate and current information on non-immigrant students (F and M visa), exchange visitors (J visa), and their dependents (F-2, M-2, and J-2). SEVIS enables schools and program sponsors to transmit mandatory information and event notifications via the Internet, to the DHS and DOS throughout a student or exchange visitor's stay in the United States.


Question #7 – Diversity Visa Lottery
What is the Diversity Visa Lottery and who can win it?

Answer #7
Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net On-Line database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.


Question #8 – Travel
My visa is still valid but my passport is expired, can I still enter the U.S. with a visa on an expired passport? Can I transfer the visa in my old passport to my new passport?

Answer #8
If you have renewed your passport, you may enter the U.S. with the new passport. You will be required to show the valid but unexpired visa stamp in the expired passport to the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) Officer. (You will need to carry both the expired passport containing the valid visa stamp and the new passport).


Question #9 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
My current H-1B expires on 4/02/12 and I filed for an extension in January 2012 and got a receipt. May I continue to work for my employer without the extension approval?

Answer #9
Yes, under regulation 8 C.F.R. §274a.12(b)(20), a person lawfully employed under A-3, E-1,E-2,E-3,G-5, H-1B, H-2A/B, H-3, I, J-1, L-1, O-1/O-2, P-1/P-2/P-3, R or TN status who timely files an application for extension consistent with 8 C.F.R. §214.1, is automatically given 240 days from the date of expiration. During 240 days, there is no INA 245(c) bar to adjustment of status.


Question #10 – General
Does premium processing apply to visas other than the employment based?

Answer #10
At the present time, the option to premium processing only applies to Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker and Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, March 30, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 2, 2012

February 27, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 2nd, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, November 11, 2011

November 7, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, November 11th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, October 14, 2011

October 14, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – General
I was able to file I-485 applications for myself and my wife in July and since then we have received the combined EAD/AP card. Can my wife now apply for a SSN? My health insurance coverage is requesting that she obtain a SSN.

Answer #1
Yes, your wife can now apply for a Social Security Number. She will need to take her valid Employment Authorization Document (EAD), her passport, birth certificate and the completed application to the local Social Security Administration office to apply.


Question #2 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
How many H-1B nonimmigrant visas remain under H1B CAP? MASTER’S CAP?

Answer #2
As of October 7, 2011, there were approximately 24,000 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 900 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #3 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Has the suspension been lifted for the issuance of Prevailing wage determinations? Please provide an update.

Answer #3
As of October 14, 2011 – More AILA members are beginning to receive PERM prevailing wage determinations for requests that were submitted in late July 2011 (OES based). Notice has not yet been provided by the DOL that the suspension has been lifted.

As of September 30, 2011 – More AILA members are beginning to receive PERM prevailing wage determinations for requests that were submitted in early July 2011 (OES based). Notice has not yet been provided by the DOL that the suspension has been lifted.

As of September 15, 2011 - DOL Liaison has received reports that AILA members are beginning to receive PERM prevailing wage determinations for requests that were submitted as recently as June 23, 2011.

As of September 9, 2011 - Of the approximately 3,500 H-2B wage redeterminations to be completed by the end of September, DOL has completed approximately 2,700. DOL expects to be current on H-2B redeterminations by the week of Sept 18, 2011. After H-2B redeterminations are current, a few employees will continue to work on “straggler” H-2B cases and all others who were working on redeterminations will be reassigned to work on new H-2B prevailing wage requests. DOL expects H-2B prevailing wage determinations to be current (regulatory 30 days) by mid-October. After H-2Bs are current, DOL will shift resources to focus on PERM prevailing wage requests. DOL commits to have PERM prevailing wage requests current (processed within 60 days of filing) by November 1. DOL commits to have H-1B prevailing wage determinations current by the second week of November. The aforementioned dates were said to be the “worse case scenario,” absent something catastrophic (e,g. hurricane) or other major event/change. DOL agreed that stakeholders would benefit from updates on progress made toward these processing targets, and would consider publishing an update on the status of prevailing wages at the end of September on the OFLC website. DOL repeated that it will not waive any of the regulatory requirements and did not provide any additional guidance on alternative avenues for PERM cases that are ripe for filing but for the lack of a prevailing wage determination.

As of August 25, 2011 - The Department of Labor (DOL) Liaison has received reports from members that PERM prevailing wage determinations are beginning to be received for requests submitted in early June 2011. Additionally, the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has been in discussions with other stakeholders on possible courses of action, including individual mandamus actions, if DOL does not resume issuing prevailing wage determinations promptly.

Original Update: The OFLC National Prevailing Wage Center is experiencing delays in processing prevailing wage determinations as it is currently working to reissue certain determinations to comply with a court order issued June 15, 2011 in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. A Notice of Proposed Rulemaking was published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2011, and a Final Rule was published on August 1. All Center resources are currently being utilized to comply with this court order. The processing of Prevailing Wage Determinations, redeterminations, and Center Director Reviews has been temporarily suspended. Processing will resume as soon as full compliance with the court order has been completed by OFLC.


Question #4 – Employment Based - Green Card
I would like to ask - i have a pending eb3 application with priority date on May 2007 but a new employment visa is offered to me - h1b. Can i be approved with the said visa even if i have pending eb3 application? Thank you.

Answer #4
It depends. You have not provided enough information to provide a solid answer to your question. The temporary H-1B nonimmigrant visa is a different process than the Employment Based Green Card process. I would recommend that you contact an experienced Immigration Attorney to discuss your eligibility. Please feel free to contact our office to schedule a consultation.


Question #5 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
We received approval from USCIS for H-1B for our new employee. Our new employee scheduled consulate interview and was denied visa, how is this possible?

Answer #5
Form I-797 indicates that the approval is not a visa, only the U.S. Consulates have the authority to grant or deny a nonimmigrant visa. If an individual has an H1B petition approved by USCIS that does not mean that the U.S. Consular Officer will automatically issue the H1B visa. The Consular Officer may ask a serious of questions and if they believe that the information obtained during the questioning was not information available at the time of the USCIS’s approval of the petition, they will likely issue a denial and provide a written explanation as to why the visa was denied.


Question #6 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
My wife arrived in the U.S. about three (3) weeks back. She went through Consular Processing and received temporary LPR stamp valid for one year. When should we be receiving her physical Green Card? Do we need to go to Airport again for issuance or will the USCIS send the Green Card to her?

Answer #6
The USCIS should send/mail the Green Card to the address they have listed. If you have not received the Green Card within 60 days from her arrival, contact the USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283.


Question #7 – Diversity Lottery (DV)
Can I apply for DV now?

Answer #7
Yes, applications for the DV 2013 random lottery are being accepted electronically until Saturday, November 5, 2011.


Question #8 – Temporary Work Visas – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
The Processing Time Table indicates it takes about 2 months to process H1B. So I am not sure why I have not received decision yet, my case was filed in June. Can you tell me why it is taking so long?

Answer #8
Although the USCIS processing times may state 2 months, you have to factor in that when it is posted, that data is already 45 days old. Also, due to the FY2012 H-1B CAPS still being available, the USCIS is busy with attempting to adjudicate change of status petitions, extensions and transfers all within the same processing times. Although this explanation is not an excuse, you should be aware of the background with the processing times for the H-1B nonimmigrant visa.


Question #9 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
What happens if my wife and I do not file to remove the conditions on her permanent residency?

Answer #9
If you do not apply to remove the conditions near the expiration of her two-year conditional period then the permanent residency automatically expires and she is subject to deportation and removal. To avoid this, within 90 days of the expiration of the conditional period, she must file Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence.


Question #10 – Marriage Based Immigration –Green Card
My spouse and I have been called for Stokes interview. What exactly is a “Stokes” interview?

Answer #10
A “Stokes” interview is the last opportunity the USCIS provides for you and your spouse to prove the bona fides of your marriage. If the USCIS does not think that your marriage is legitimate, they will schedule a “Stokes” interview. The husband and wife are separately questioned by a USCIS Officer regarding their relationship history, daily interactions, relationship in general, and presence on social networking websites, etc. The interview/questioning is recorded and an attorney is permitted to attend.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, October 28th, 2011!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

APPLY TODAY for the 2013 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 4, 2011

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2013 random lottery will be accepted Tuesday, October 4, 2011 through Saturday, November 5, 2011. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2013, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Taiwan, South Sudan and Poland are eligible.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2013 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

From May 1, 2012, DV-2013 entrants will be able to use their unique confirmation number provided at registration to check online through Entry Status Check to see if their entry was selected. Successfull entrants will receive instructions on how to apply for immigrant visas for themselves and their eligible family members. Confirmation of visa interview appointments will also be made through Entry Status Check.

APPLY BEGINNING October 4, 2011 for the 2013 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 3, 2011

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 50,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2013 random lottery will be accepted Tuesday, October 4, 2011 through Saturday, November 5, 2011. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2013, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Taiwan, South Sudan and Poland are eligible.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2013 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

Green Card Lottery: 15 Million Entries for ONLY 50,000 Green Cards

December 21, 2010

This year a record number of 15 million foreign applicants entered the green card lottery system which only hands out 50,000 green cards each year.

The lottery program was established by the State Department back in 1990. Participation in the lottery has grown steadily as people in the developing word have gained increasing access to the internet. The month long enrollment period ended on November 3. Many people apply year after year since there is no limit on the number of times you can apply. The only rule is that only 7% of the winning applicants may come from any one country.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

October 11, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, October 15th, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, October 15th, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

APPLY TODAY for the 2012 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 5, 2010

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 55,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2012 random lottery will begin to be accepted today Tuesday, October 5, 2010 through Wednesday, November 3, 2010. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2012, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible. No countries have been added or removed from the previous year’s list of eligible countries..

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, Peru, Poland, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2012 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

From May 1, 2011, DV-2012 entrants will be able to use their unique confirmation number provided at registration to check online through Entry Status Check to see if their entry was selected. Successfull entrants will receive instructions on how to apply for immigrant visas for themselves and their eligible family members. Confirmation of visa interview appointments will also be made through Entry Status Check.

MVP LAW GROUP – Q&A Forum, October 1st, 2010

October 1, 2010

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
What is the grace period on H-1B extension? I reside in California, my current H-1B visa expires on 9/25/2010 and I’ve filed for an extension on 9/7/2010. Got certified mail receipt for it. I was told by my lawyer that I have 240 days grace period when an extension application is pending. I need to have some sort of documentation proof on this fact for my employer. Is there anyway I can obtain it?

Answer #1
Under regulation 8 C.F.R. §274a.12(b)(20), a person lawfully employed under A-3, E-1,E-2,E-3,G-5,H-1B, H-2A/B, H-3, I, J-1, L-1, O-1/O-2, P-1/P-2/P-3, R or TN status who timely files an application for extension consistent with 8 C.F.R. §214.1, is automatically given 240 days from date of expiration. This extension does not apply to persons seeking a change of status. During 240 days, there is no INA 245(c) bar to adjustment of status.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I got my I-140 petition approved. Next step is to apply for AOS. What kind of document I need to have for AOS application?

Answer #2
In order to apply for AOS, your priority date needs to be current, once your priority date is current, you will able to file the Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident along with the Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document. There are numerous background documents that will need to be submitted along with your petition, specifically, a sealed medical examination from a civil surgeon in your area, birth certificates, copies of federal tax returns, bank statements, and an employment verification letter, among other documents.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My name is mistakenly typed in the form I-129 submitted to USCIS. In that form only, in all other forms (including I-129 supplements) it has typed correctly. Name mistyped on I-129, so reflecting wrong name on I-797, what I need to do now?

Answer #3
If you believe that the mistake on your I-129 receipt notice (Form I-797) would cause severe issues down the road, you will need to contact the USCIS National Customer Service number (1-800-375-5283) and speak with an Agent to request that the mistake be corrected, so that your I-129 Approval notice (Form I-797) will provide the correct spelling of your name.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I have some questions to ask about immigration. I am currently on Stem Opt extension and I am a full time employee, my stem opt started on Jan. 15th 2010. I have worked for one client in May 2010 through a vendor and the vendor said they cannot run my payroll directly. I contacted one consultancy but I did not know they are not e-verified. The consultancy got the money from the vendor and they are not enrolling into e-verify now. I am not sure what will be the situation if the non-e-verified company runs my payroll. My current company will apply for my H1 this year. Please advise.

Answer #4
Your current company/present employer should be the one responsible for running your payroll, not the vendor nor the end client. From the information you have provided, it does not seem like you are a direct employee of the vendor or the end client, therefore the only entity responsible for running your payroll is your current company.


Question #5 – Diversity Lottery (DV)
Can I apply for DV now?

Answer #5
Applications for the DV 2012 random lottery will be accepted beginning Tuesday, October 5, 2010 through Wednesday, November 3, 2010. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. For more information relating to the DV 2010 random lottery, please refer to www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Regarding a change of job, is there a recommended wait time after the green card that I can change my employer. On the EAD there was a 6mth after which I could do this, but was wondering after the GC if there is any such thing. Appreciate your response.

Answer #6
Although the regulations are silent on this issue, we recommend that you wait at least six (6) months before changing your employer to avoid issues if you intend on applying for citizenship when you become eligible.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Is the H-1B quota still open? Do I still have time to file for an H-1B even though October 1, 2010 is right around the corner?

Answer #7
As of September 24, 2010, there were approximately 25,400 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and approximately 5,600 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to www.mvp.com.


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Is an approved I-765 any indication that the I-485 is getting close to approval and would eventually BE approved without a hitch or are they autonomous processes?

Answer #8
They are separate creatures. Therefore, to put it simply, an approved I-765 is not an indication that the I-485 is getting closer to being approved.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I need to file my H-1b as soon as possible, but I am scheduled to leave the country early next week. If I file and leave, will there be any complications? Please advise.

Answer #9
Pursuant to regulation 8 C.F.R. 214.2(h)(15)(i), a person must be in the U.S. when an extension is filed, but may travel abroad while an extension is pending. If the beneficiary is required to travel while the extension is pending, the approval can be sent via cable (or through the PIMS system) to the appropriate consular post upon the Petitioner’s request. We recommend that if you have a pending extension with the USCIS, you do not travel outside of the U.S. unless it is an emergency.


Question #10 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My AP expires today and since i just came back from INDIA, i dont see any travel need for quite some time now hence i am not applying for extension of AP. Is that OK? Or do we need to always apply it before the current one expires. I think we can always apply only on needs basis and do it at a later stage. Will that be fine?

Answer #10
You do not need to apply for the AP prior to the expiration of the current AP. You can always apply at a later date.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, October 15, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

APPLY BEGINNING October 5, 2010 for the 2012 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

September 30, 2010

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 55,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2012 random lottery will be accepted Tuesday, October 5, 2010 through Wednesday, November 3, 2010. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2012, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, and Taiwan are eligible. No countries have been added or removed from the previous year’s list of eligible countries..

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, Peru, Poland, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2012 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

APPLY TODAY for the 2011 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 8, 2009

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 55,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2011 random lottery will be accepted Friday, October 2, 2009 through Monday, November 30, 2009. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2011, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Taiwan, Russia and Kosovo are eligible. No countries have been removed from the list of eligible countries for DV- 2010.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, Peru, Poland, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2011 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions

APPLY TODAY for the Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery – ONLY ONLINE ENTRIES ACCEPTED

October 2, 2008

Annually, the United States government issues a maximum of 55,000 green cards through a computer-generated random lottery drawing. Applications for the DV 2010 random lottery will be accepted October 2, 2008 through December 1, 2008. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period.

These green cards are only available to those eligible participants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. For DV-2010, persons born in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Taiwan, Russia and Kosovo are eligible. No countries have been removed from the list of eligible countries for DV- 2010.

Natives of the following countries are not eligible to apply because the countries sent a total of more than 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. in the previous five years: Brazil, Canada, China (mainland-born), Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, Peru, Poland, South Korea, United Kingdom (except Northern Ireland) and its dependent territories, and Vietnam.

To enter the DV lottery , you must be a native of one of the eligible countries. In most cases this means the country in which you were born. However, there are two other ways you may be able to qualify. First, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible but your spouse was born in a country whose natives are eligible, you can claim your spouse's country of birth provided both you and your spouse are on the selected entry, are issued visas and enter the U.S. simultaneously. Second, if you were born in a country whose natives are ineligible, but neither of your parents was born there or resided there at the time of your birth, you may claim nativity in one of your parents' country of birth if it is a country whose natives qualify for the DV-2010 program.

You must also meet either the education or work experience requirement of the DV program. You must have either a high school education or its equivalent, defined as successful completion of a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education; OR, two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years of training or experience to perform. The U.S. Department of Labor's O*Net OnLine database will be used to determine qualifying work experience.

If you cannot meet either of these requirements, you should NOT submit an entry to the DV program.

Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery Instructions