AILA-DC Attorneys Will Provide Free Citizenship Assistance on April 26, 2014

April 14, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC – On Saturday, April 26, 2014, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., the Washington, DC Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA-DC) will take part in the eighth annual AILA Citizenship Day, hosting events at nine locations throughout D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.

Each year in April, at sites across the country, AILA attorneys and other stakeholders provide assistance to lawful permanent residents eligible for naturalization. Last year, AILA and its partner "ya es hora ¡Ciudadanía!" held 40 naturalization clinics in 23 states and the District of Columbia serving thousands of immigrants who aspired to become citizens.


The sites below have been confirmed for Citizenship Day 2014 :

Catholic Charities Esperanza Center
430 S. Broadway
Baltimore, MD 21231
Pre- Registration Required
Contact: 443-825-3421
*$50 Fee collected by Catholic Charities


CASA De Maryland
8151 15th Avenue,
Langley Park, MD 20783
Contact: Molly: 240-670-4850
*$25 Fee for CASA membership collected


Jesus House DC
919 Philadelphia Ave
E. Adeboye Hall (L.L)
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Contact: 240-271-0148


FIRN
5999 Harpers Farm Road, E-200
Columbia, MD 21044
Contact: Roselyn:410-992-1923
$20 Fee collected by FIRN


Carlos Rosario International
(Sponsored by Carlos Rosario and CARECEN)
1100 Harvard Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20009
Pre- Registration Required
*$25 Fee will be collected for completed applications
*Free to Carlos Rosario Students with valid ID
Contact: Rachel @ 202-328-9799 ext. 23



Ethiopian Community Center
(Sponsored by Mayor’s Office on African Affairs & ECC)
7603 Georgia Avenue, NW,
Suite 100
Washington, D.C. 20012
Contact: eth@prodigy.net


Chinese Community Church
(Sponsored by DC Mayor’s Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs and Chinatown Service Center)
500 I Street, NW,
Washington D.C 20001
Contact: Ngoc (202)727-3120


Just Neighbors Ministry
5827 Columbia Pike, #320
Falls Church, VA 22041
Pre-Registration required
*$20.00 Fee collected by JNM
Contact: Kyle-703-979-1240 Ext. 34


Branch Baptist Church
3400 Broad Rock Blvd
Richmond, VA 23234
Contact: refugelaw@gmail.com


At each site, a dozen attorneys will be joined by numerous other volunteers and staff to help eligible local immigrants apply for citizenship. Detailed information about registration and documentation requirements is available upon request.

“In discussing the plight of the undocumented and the need for immigration reform, we sometimes forget how many people have come here from other countries not only with lawful status, but also the desire to become citizens,” observed Cynthia Rosenberg, AILA-DC Chair. “Citizenship Day is a wonderful opportunity to highlight how many foreign nationals wish to take this important final step toward joining the American dream.”

AILA Citizenship Day is an award-winning venture, capturing the 2008 Award of Excellence in the Associations Advance America Awards program, a national competition sponsored by the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) and The Center for Association Leadership. AILA’s successes with this event are due in large part to the national collaborative relationships that AILA has developed both with community organizations and stakeholders, as well as the USCIS Office of Citizenship. Last year, AILA-DC members co-sponsored local events with seven community-based organizations in the Washington metropolitan area, from Baltimore to Richmond.


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The AILA-DC Chapter represents over 1000 member attorneys in Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia established to promote justice, advocate for fair and reasonable immigration law and policy, advance the quality of immigration and nationality law and practice, and enhance the professional development of its members. Located close to the headquarters offices of the agencies that administer our immigration system, as well as the houses of Congress, our chapter maintains close contact with the lawmakers and officials who have an important impact on our clients' lives.

USCIS Teleconference Invitation - Revised Form N-400, Application for Naturalization

February 7, 2014

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will be presenting a teleconference on the revised form N-400, Application for Naturalization. This teleconference will take place on Thursday, February 20, 2014 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (EST). This free session will provide an overview of the revisions made to form N-400, which was released on February 4, 2014. The USCIS will also entertain questions on the subject.

The revised Form N-400 contains:
- Clearer and more comprehensive instructions;
- 2D barcode technology; and
- New questions based on national security and good moral character.

To Register for this Session:
Please visit the USCIS registration page to confirm your participation. Be sure to provide your full name and organization by following these steps:
1. Enter your email address and select “Submit”
2. Select “Subscriber Preferences”
3. Select the “Event Registration” tab
4. Complete the questions and select “Submit”

Once your registration is processed, you will receive a confirmation email with additional details.

Please review the USCIS information linked below for more details!


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, 2/5/14, Outreach - National Engagement:
Revised Form N-400, Application for Naturalization


Related Links:

Revised Form N-400 - Teleconference Invitation

Revised Form N-400 - Stakeholder Presentation (handouts)

Revised Form N-400 – Video Presentation

Update on the Processing Times for Form I-130

November 27, 2013

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) have sent out an email notice to USCIS Stakeholders that they are working to reduce the extended processing times for Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative. This form is filed by U.S. citizens for their eligible immediate relatives and is the first step in helping the relative to immigrate to the United States.

The USCIS has been receiving feedback from the public expressing concerns regarding extended processing times for Form I-130. USCIS is working on the delays as part of their goal of preserving family unity. In the last few months the processing time has went from October 2012 to February 2013; that puts the processing time to around 9 months. We have found in practice that current I-130 processing is taking between 6 months to 11 months. USCIS’s goal is to return to an average processing time of five months by May 2014.

Last month, in an effort to expedite the adjudication of these cases, USCIS began transferring stand-alone Forms I-130 filed by U.S. citizens for their immediate relatives from USCIS’s National Benefits Center to its Nebraska, Texas, and California Service Centers. This shift improves USCIS’s ability to adjudicate the cases in a timely manner.”

If your case was transferred you will receive a Notice of Transfer which will include the date of transfer and where your case will now be processed. The original receipt number will not change and this action will not cause any further delay in processing your case. For further information and details please review the email notice listed below.


Source of Information:

USCIS Message: Update on the processing times of Form I-130s filed by U.S. citizens for their eligible immediate relatives

Updated Service Center Processing Times

November 20, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 11/18/13 with processing dates as of 9/30/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

October 22, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 10/16/13 with processing dates as of 8/31/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

What Happens If the Government Shuts Down? – Updated 9/30/13

September 30, 2013

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has requested information from the federal government agencies involved in the immigration system for updates on their contingency plans in case of a government shutdown. A possible government shutdown could happen as early as October 1, 2013, the beginning of the new fiscal year 2014 (FY2014). AILA has reported that they have not received any updated information at this time. They suggested reviewing the shutdown plans for the last threatened federal government shutdown, which was in 2011.

Below is an excerpt from MVP Law Group’s original blog post on the subject dated (4/8/11).

~---------------~

In general, if the government shuts down for budgetary reasons, all but "essential" government are furloughed and not allowed to work. So what does this mean for immigration agencies?

USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services): A couple of shutdown threats back, a USCIS official stated at a stakeholder engagement that USCIS (other than the human touches on E-Verify) would not need to shut down, since all of the agency, other than E-Verify, is funded by fees. However, it is not clear that this is the case, and at least one local office has indicated that it is working on its shutdown plan. AILA will update this information as they get more information.

DOS (Department of State): If there is a shutdown, the result for DOS will likely be the same as it was in the 1996 government closing. Then, the only visa issuance being done was for some diplomats and for "life or death" situations. As DOS is wont to say "a really, really important business meeting is not life or death."

CBP (Customs and Border Patrol): Inspection and law enforcement are considered "essential personnel," though staffing may be more limited than usual. The borders will be open, and CBP is unsure of how the shutdown will affect the processing of applications filed at the border.

EOIR (Executive Office for Immigration Review): EOIR has indicated that personnel who are not considered "essential" will be furloughed, but that the detained docket would likely continue in operation. (Updated as of 9/30/2013)

DOL (Department of Labor): In the event of a government shutdown, the Office of Foreign Labor Certification (OFLC) will neither accept nor process any applications or related materials it receives. (Updated as of 9/30/2013)

Other agencies will be added, and the above updated, as AILA obtains more information.


Source of Information:

- AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11040730 (posted 4/7/11)
- AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11040730 (posted 9/ 25/13)

USCIS Announces FY 2013 Grants

September 24, 2013

On Tuesday, September 17, 2013, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced they have awarded nearly $9.9 million in grants to qualified organizations serving immigrants. These grants will be used by 40 organizations from 21 states to help prepare legal permanent residents (LPR) for U.S. citizenship.

The News Release stated, “Under this year’s program, grant recipients will offer citizenship instruction to prepare permanent residents for the civics and English components of the naturalization test, and naturalization application services within the scope of the authorized practice of immigration law. The period of performance for the grants is two years.”

USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas stated, “This funding will help thousands of permanent residents gain the support they need to learn English and civics, and embrace the important rights and responsibilities of United States citizenship.” For more detailed information please review the USCIS News Release listed below.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, 9/17/13, News Release:
USCIS Announces Fiscal Year 2013 Grant Recipients on Constitution Day and Citizenship Day


Related Links:

USCIS’s Citizenship Resource Center

USCIS’s Citizenship and Integration Grant Program

Updated Service Center Processing Times

September 19, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 9/17/13 with processing dates as of 7/31/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

August 27, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 8/20/13 with processing dates as of 6/30/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Impact of New Americans: West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming & The United States*

August 23, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming and the United States*.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts


*not a state

DHS Report - Estimates of the Legal Permanent Resident Population in 2012

August 21, 2013

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Office of Immigration Statistics has released a report entitled, “Estimates of the Legal Permanent Resident Population in 2012.” This report uses estimates of the legal permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States as of January 1, 2012. An LPR is any person not a citizen of the United States, who is residing in the U.S. under legally recognized and lawfully recorded permanent residence as an immigrant, also known as a "Green Card Holder.” The estimates are shown for the total LPR population, and the LPR population eligible to apply to naturalize by country of birth, state of residence, and the year LPR status was obtained.

Data for the estimates was obtained primarily from administrative records of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). An estimated 13.3 million LPRs lived in the United States as of January 1, 2012, and 8.8 million of them were eligible to become U.S. citizens. The majority (61 percent) obtained LPR status in 2000 or later.


Source of Information:
DHS.gov, July 2013, Publications
Estimates of the Legal Permanent Resident Population in 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 8/12/13

August 15, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 12, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13081246 (posted 8/12/13)

USCIS.gov, (8/12/13), AAO Processing Times

Updated Service Center Processing Times

August 9, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 8/2/13 with processing dates as of 5/31/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Impact of New Americans: Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia & Washington

August 5, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia and Washington.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: New Mexico, New Jersey, Oklahoma & Oregon

July 30, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; New Mexico, New Jersey, Oklahoma and Oregon.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Updated Service Center Processing Times

July 24, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 7/19/13 with processing dates as of 5/31/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Impact of New Americans: Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts & Michigan

July 24, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts and Michigan.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska & New Hampshire

July 17, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska and New Hampshire.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 7/2/13

July 12, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of July 2, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13071057 (posted 7/10/13)

USCIS.gov, (7/9/13), AAO Processing Times

Impact of New Americans: Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia*& Idaho

July 8, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released all fifty states, the District of Columbia and the United States (Overall), for a total of fifty-two updated fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia* and Idaho.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts


*not a state

Happy Fourth of July!

July 4, 2013


“Immigrants signed their names to our Declaration and helped win our independence. Immigrants helped lay the railroads and build our cities, calloused hand by calloused hand. Immigrants took up arms to preserve our union, to defeat fascism, and to win a Cold War. Immigrants and their descendants helped pioneer new industries and fuel our Information Age, from Google to the iPhone. So the story of immigrants in America isn’t a story of "them," it’s a story of "us." It’s who we are. And now, all of you get to write the next chapter.” – President Barack Obama

(Part of Speech given during military naturalization ceremony for active duty service members in the East Room of the White House, July 4, 2012)


No matter what your plans are for this Fourth of July, make it a memorable day by spending time with your family and friends. Have a picnic, go to the fireworks, watch a parade or just celebrate with a quiet moment. Please remember those brave men and women who gave their lives to defend our country and its freedoms.


Happy Birthday, America!



Related Link: USA.gov, Fourth of July is Independence Day

Impact of New Americans: Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota & Ohio

July 3, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released ten more states, for a total of thirty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota and Ohio.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: Alaska, Indiana, Georgia & Maine

June 27, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released ten more states, for a total of thirty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Alaska, Indiana, Georgia and Maine.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Alaska

Indiana

Georgia

Maine


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Resources for Citizenship – Find Local English and Citizenship Classes!

June 14, 2013

If you are searching for “English as a Second Language” or “Citizenship” classes in your local area try using the America's Literacy Directory (ALD). First you choose the type of class/classes you are looking for, then just type in your zip code or city/state and active the search. If the directory locates a training source within your local area it will list the details. You can also generate a map and driving directions for all programs listed in the ALD.

America's Literacy Directory (ALD) is a web site that allows users to find local literacy providers in all 50 states and the U.S. territories. The ALD includes literacy programs for adults looking for adult basic education, adult secondary education, computer literacy and English as a Second Language.


Source of Information:

Lincs.ed.gov, website, America's Literacy Directory (ALD)

USCIS.gov, website, Find Help in Your Community

Impact of New Americans: Tennessee, Texas, Utah & Vermont

June 13, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released the first twenty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Vermont.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island & South Carolina

June 6, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released the first twenty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island and South Carolina.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

New York

North Carolina

Rhode Island

South Carolina


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky & Minnesota

May 30, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released the first twenty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky and Minnesota.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Minnesota


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Updated Service Center Processing Times

May 28, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on 5/21/13 with processing dates as of 3/31/13.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.


California Service Center

National Benefits Center

Nebraska Service Center

Texas Service Center

Vermont Service Center


**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Impact of New Americans: Delaware, Florida, Hawaii & Illinois

May 23, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released the first twenty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Delaware, Florida, Hawaii and Illinois.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Delaware: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-delaware

Florida: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-florida

Hawaii: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-hawaii

Illinois: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-illinois


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

Impact of New Americans: Alabama, Arizona, California & Connecticut

May 17, 2013

Immigration Policy Center Releases Updated State-by-State Fact Sheets!

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has released the first twenty updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying info graphics. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants, Asians and Latinos in each state. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy division of the American Immigration Council (AIC).

As Washington D.C. debates Comprehensive Immigration Reform, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this IPC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on four states at a time. This week we will highlight; Alabama, Arizona, California and Connecticut.

The IPC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

To view the state-by-state fact sheets click on the links below:

Alabama: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-alabama

Arizona: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-arizona

California: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-california

Connecticut: http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts/new-americans-connecticut


Source of Information:

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), May 2013, Just the Facts
http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just-facts

DHS Annual Report - FY2012 Statistics on Naturalizations

April 9, 2013

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to foreign citizens or nationals after fulfilling the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). After naturalization, foreign-born citizens enjoy nearly all the same benefits, rights and responsibilities that the Constitution gives to native-born U.S. citizens, including the right to vote.

The Office of Immigration Statistics Annual Flow Report presents information on the number and characteristics of foreign nationals aged 18 years and over who were naturalized during FY 2012.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) report states that in FY2012 a total of 757,434 persons were naturalized. The leading countries of birth of new naturalized citizens were Mexico (102,181), the Philippines (44,958), India (42,928), the Dominican Republic (33,351), and China (31,868). The largest number of persons naturalized lived in the states of California (158,850), Florida (100,890), and New York (93,584). Read the report linked here for more details, “U.S. Naturalizations: 2012”.


Source of Information:

DHS.gov, web page:
http://www.dhs.gov/publication/us-naturalizations-2012

DHS Office of Immigration Statistics, Annual Flow Report - March 2013:
U.S. Naturalizations: 2012

DHS.gov, Data Tables including supplemental tables (XLS files):
Naturalization (FY2012) Data Tables

DHS Annual Report - FY2012 Statistics on Legal Permanent Residents

April 4, 2013

A legal permanent resident (LPR) or “green card” recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United States. Permanent resident status confers certain rights and responsibilities. For example, LPRs may live and work permanently anywhere in the United States, own property, and attend public schools, colleges, and universities. They may also join certain branches of the Armed Forces and may apply to become U.S. citizens if they meet certain eligibility requirements.

The Office of Immigration Statistics Annual Flow Report presents information obtained from applications for LPR status on the number and characteristics of persons who became LPRs in the United States during 2012.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) report states that in FY2012 a total of 1,031,631 persons became LPRs. The report points out that nearly (66%) of the LPRs granted permanent resident status were based on a family relationship with a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident. The three leading countries of birth for new LPRs were Mexico (14%), China (7.9%) and India (6.4%). Read the report linked here for more details, “U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: 2012”.


Source of Information:

DHS.gov, web page:
http://www.dhs.gov/publication/us-legal-permanent-residents-2012

DHS Office of Immigration Statistics, Annual Flow Report - March 2013:
U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: 2012

DHS.gov, Data Tables including supplemental tables (XLS files):
LPR (FY2012) Data Tables

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

March 6, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 12 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

USCIS Celebrates Presidents' Day all week

February 19, 2013

The USCIS will celebrate Presidents’ Day (2/18/13) by welcoming thousands of new citizens in special naturalization ceremonies across the nation. These special ceremonies take place across the country at different locations. The link below will display all the locations! The ceremonies began on Friday, February 15, 2013 and will end on February 22, 2013.

Please visit the USCIS.gov website for a full list of President's Day Special Naturalization Ceremonies

Source of Information: "USCIS News Release (2/13/2013)"

MVP Law Group would like to congratulate these new citizens! Special ceremonies like these are not only a good way to celebrate a national holiday but a great way to let legal immigrants know how important they are to our society.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

February 8, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on February 5, 2013 with processing dates as of December 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

February 7, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of February 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 14 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

January 9, 2013

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on January 4, 2013 with processing dates as of November 30, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

December 12, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of December 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 8 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is now current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 21 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

December 6, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on December 5, 2012 with processing dates as of October 30, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

November 16, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of November 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 9 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 10 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is now current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 24 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

October 31, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on October 29, 2012 with processing dates as of September 30, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS (1-800-375-5283).

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

October 24, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on October 19, 2012 with processing dates as of August 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

Note: USCIS re-released its processing time reports as of 8/31/12, to include a line item for I-601s.

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Round-Up of Immigration Related Legislation (Jan-Sept 2012)

October 18, 2012

The following immigration-related bills were introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate January 2012-September 2012.

Senate Bills

S. 3245
Introduced by Sen. Leahy (D-VT) on 5/24/12
Permanently reauthorizes the EB-5 Regional Center Program, the E-Verify Program, the Special Immigrant Nonminister Religious Worker Program, and the Conrad State 30 J-1 Visa Waiver Program

Student Visa Integrity Act (S. 3527)
Introduced by Sen. Schumer (D-NY) on 9/11/12
Creates increased criminal penalties for individuals misuing the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), mandates certification for institutions enrolling international students, and prohibits certain schools from accessing the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.

BRAINS Act (S. 3553)
Introduced by Sen. Schumer (D-NY) on 9/19/12
Provides for immigrants visas for certain advanced STEM graduates, student visa reform, age-out protections for children, retention of priority dates, and family reunifications for high-skilled workers

House Bills

Scott Gardner Act (H.R. 3808)
Introduced by Rep. Myrick (R-NC) on 1/23/12
Directs DOJ to take into custody an alien who is unlawfully in the United States and is arrested by a state or local law enforcement officer for driving while intoxicated or similar violation. The bill also directs the officer, upon reasonable grounds to believe the individual is an alien, to verify immigration status and to take into custody for federal transfer if unlawfully in the United States.

Adjusted Residency for Military Service (ARMS) Act (H.R. 3823)
Introduced by Rep. Rivera (R-FL) on 1/24/12
Authorizes DHS to cancel the removal of, and adjust to conditional nonimmigrant status, an alien who meets specific requirements, including (1) entered the United States before his or her 16th birthday and has been present in the United States for at least five years immediately preceding this Act's enactment; (2) is a person of good moral character; (3) is not inadmissible or deportable under specified grounds of the Immigration and Nationality Act; (4) has not participated in the persecution of any person on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion; (5) has not been convicted of certain offenses under federal or state law; (6) has been admitted to an institution of higher education or has earned a high school diploma or general education development certificate in the United States; (7) has never been under a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal unless the alien has remained in the United States under color of law after such order's issuance, or received the order before attaining the age of 16; and (8) was under age 30 on the date of this Act's enactment.

H.R. 3842
Introduced by Rep. Black (R-TN) on 1/31/12
Prohibits federal funds from being used by a federal agency or instrumentality to participate in a lawsuit to overturn, enjoin, or otherwise invalidate specified immigration-related laws in Oklahoma, Missouri, Arizona, Utah, Indiana, Alabama, South Carolina, or Georgia.

Visa Waiver Program Enhanced Security and Reform Act (H.R. 3855)
Introduced by Rep. Quigley (D-IL) on 1/31/2012
Amends the INA in regards to the visa waiver program to 1. Authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to designate any country as a program country; 2. Adjust visa refusal rate criteria, including the addition of a 3% maximum overstay rate; and 3. Revise probationary and termination provisions

Ensuring Mental Competence in Immigration Proceedings Act (H.R. 3881)
Introduced by Rep. Stark (D-CA) on 2/2/12
Authorizes immigration judges to order a competency evaluation, terminate a proceeding, or appoint counsel when necessary for aliens with mental disabilities

Strengthening America's Public Schools Through Promoting Foreign Investment Act (H.R. 3983)
Introduced by Rep. Owens (D-NY) on 2/8/12
Permits a lawful alien who enters the United States on a nonimmigrant student visa to attend a U.S. pubic secondary school for longer than one year if such alien reimburses the full, unsubsidized per capita cost of providing education at such school for the period of the alien's attendance

H.R. 3992
Introduced by Rep. Berman (D-CA) on 2/9/12
Makes Israeli nationals eligible to enter the United States as nonimmigrant traders and investors if Israel provides reciprocal nonimmigrant treatment to U.S. nationals

H.R. 4021
Introduced by Rep. Faleomavaega (D-AS At-Large)
Waives certain requirements for naturalization for American Samoan U.S. nationals to become U.S. citizens

H.R. 4982- VAWA Reauthorization
Introduced by Rep. Biggert (R-IL) on 4/27/12
Reauthorizes Violence Against Women Act of 1994 with amendments.

Virgin Islands Visa Waiver Act of 2012 (H.R. 5875)
Introduced by Rep. Christensen (D-VI -At Large) on 5/31/12
Establishes a visa waiver program for the United States Virgin Islands for a national of a country that is a member/associate member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and who is applying for admission as a nonimmigrant business or pleasure visitor for not more than 30 days.

Visa Waiver for Israel Act of 2012 (H.R. 5850)
Introduced by Rep. Sherman (D-CA) on 5/18/12
Includes Israel in the visa waiver program upon determination that Israel: (1) has entered into an agreement with the United States to report, or make available through Interpol or other means, information about passport theft or loss; (2) has entered into an information sharing agreement with the United States regarding whether Israeli citizens and nationals traveling to the United States represent a U.S. security threat; (3) cooperates with the U.S. government on counterterrorism initiatives, information sharing, and preventing terrorist travel; (4) issues all new and reissued passports with biometric identifiers; and (5) has made every reasonable effort, without jeopardizing Israeli security, to ensure that reciprocal privileges are extended to all U.S. citizens.

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2013 (H.R. 5855)
Introduced by Rep. Aderholt (R-AL) on 5/23/12
Makes appropriations for DHS for FY 2013

Startup Act 2.0 (H.R. 5893)
Introduced by Rep. Grimm (R-NY) on 6/5/12
Authorizes DHS to adjust conditional permanent resident status up to 50,000 aliens who have earned a master's or doctorate degree in STEM fields and permit such an alien to remain in the United States: (1) for up to one year after the expiration of the alien's student visa, if the alien is searching for STEM field employment; and (2) indefinitely if the alien remains actively engaged in a STEM field. Removes a STEM alien's conditional status after five years of maintaining eligibility during the entire five-year period. Authorizes the Secretary to issue conditional immigrant visas to up to 75,000 qualified alien entrepreneurs. Removes such conditional basis after four years of maintaining qualified entrepreneur status. Eliminates the per-country numerical limitation for employment-based visas. Increases the per country numerical limitation for family based immigrants from 7% to 15% of the total number of family-sponsored visas.

Prohibiting Back-door Amnesty Act (H.R. 3932)
Introduced by Rep. Quayle (R-AZ) on 6/18/12
Nullifies the following: 1)June 17, 2011 memorandum from Director of ICE regarding exercise of prosecutorial discretion; 2) June 15, 2012 memoradum from Secretary of Homeland Security regarding prosecutorial discretion with respect to individuals who came to the United States as children 3) draft directive developed by CBP containing guidance on when to exercise discretion

H.R. 5957
Introduced by Rep. Schweikert (R-AZ) on 6/18/12
Prohibits DHS from granting deferred action or otherwise suspending the effectiveness or enforcement of immigration laws

H.R. 6000
Introduced by Rep. Akin (R-MO) on 6/21/12
Requires verification of the immigration status of recipients of Federal benefit programs

H.R. 6001
Introduced by Rep. Burgess (R-TX) on 6/21/12
Prohibits DHS from granting a work authorization to an alien found to have been unlawfully present in the United States

H.R. 6070
Introduced by Rep. Barletta (R-PA) on 6/29/12
Directs the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study to determine the impact of the June 15, 2012 policy regarding exercising discretion with respect to individuals who came the United States as children. Directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to refrain from implementing the policy until after the Comptroller General has reported to Congress on the results of the study.

Employee Verification (H.R. 6112)
Introduced by Rep. Woodall (7/12/12)
Requires federal contractors and subcontractors to participate in the E-Verify program. Makes E-Verify permanent.

Family Farm Relief Act of 2012 (H.R. 6373)
Introduced by Rep. Gibson (R-NY) on 9/11/12
Amends the INA to simplify the petitioning process for H-2A workers and expands the scope of the H-2A program.

American Investment and Job Creation Act of 2012 (H.R. 6210)
Introduced by Rep. Conyers (D-MI) on 7/26/12
Provides an employment-based immigrant visa for an alien entrepreneur who has engaged in a new commercial enterprise that has 1) within the four years prior to the filing of a petition, created full-time employment for at least five U.S. workers, or in the case of a Distressed Area Development Zone, for at least three U.S. workers; and 2) received enough investment or revenue during this period to support employment creation requirements.

Attracting the Best and Brightest Act of 2012 (H.R. 6412)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 9/14/12
Provides up to 50,000 visas available to immigrations who 1) possess a graduate degree in STEM fields from qualifying U.S. research institution; 2) have an employment offer from a U.S. employer in field related to degree; 3) are the subject of an approved labor certification; 4) will receive a wage that is at least the actual wage paid by employer to all other individuals with similar experience/qualifications. Makes unused STEM visas available for other employment-based visa categories.

STEM Jobs Act of 2012 (H.R. 6429)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-TX) on 9/18/12
Creates new visa categories for foreign PhD and masters graduates in STEM fields. Eliminates the diversity immigrant visa program.

Source of Information: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 12100260 (posted Oct. 2, 2012)"

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

October 17, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of October 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 12 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 7 months; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 29 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

October 11, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on October 4, 2012 with processing dates as of August 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Celebrate Citizenship Day! (September 17, 2012)

September 21, 2012

September 17 was designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. This year marks the U.S. Constitution's 225th anniversary!

Many special Naturalization Ceremonies are being held at different locations across the country to honor this special day and anniversary! Before naturalizing, potential U.S. citizens must pass a naturalization test, which includes 10 civics questions, chosen from a pool of 100 possible questions. How well would you do on these sample questions?

1. What is the supreme law of the land?
2. The House of Representatives has how many voting members?
3. What is one responsibility that is only for U.S. citizens?
4. Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?
5. What territory did the U.S. buy from France in 1803?
6. Who was the President during World War I?
7. Name one of the two longest rivers in the U.S.
8. Why does the flag have 13 stripes?
9. When do we celebrate Independence Day?
10. When was the Constitution written?

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

September 20, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of September 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 17 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 8 months; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 31 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

September 17, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on September 13, 2012 with processing dates as of July 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 14, 2012

September 10, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 14, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Green Card Process

August 30, 2012

In EB permanent residence, commonly referred to as "green card," cases there are and have always been many unknown factors that impact processing times. The timeframes can range by years from one case to the next. Procedures can change in mid-stream, disrupting plans and strategies.

Labor Certification - PERM

All labor certifications are filed under the PERM process. Under PERM, all cases must be pre-advertised. There is a 30-day "quiet period" following the completion of recruitment efforts. The case can only be filed after the 30 days. Thus, the time required for preparation of a PERM case is a combination of this quiet period, a 30-day State Workforce Agency (SWA) job order requirement, a number of recruitment requirements, a job posting, and the need to obtain a prevailing wage determination. Of course, all of the time necessary for the preparation and review of a case, and communication between the lawyer and the employer and/or employee, must also be considered. Additional time is required for the employer to screen resumes submitted in response to recruitment efforts and to interview potentially qualified applicants. Depending upon how quickly the prevailing wage determination is issued, whether the employer has engaged in any recruitment efforts prior to the start of the PERM case, how quickly the employer or employee provides information and documentation, and the number and qualifications of job applicants, it could take as long as four to six months for the PERM case to be ready for filing.

Once it is filed, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) estimates processing times of up to 60 days. Historically, PERM processing timeframes have ranged from a few days to more than eleven months. If there is an audit by the DOL, there would be an extended delay. The time necessary for the additional processing of the audited PERM application is unknown and can add an additional year or more to the process. If all goes well, however, the time from the initiation of the PERM process to approval would be approximately six to ten months.

After Labor Approval - I-140 Petition

Following the labor certification approval, the case moves to the stages of the employer petition (I-140) and the adjustment of status (I-485). It would also be possible to select consular processing instead of I-485. This is when the time estimate becomes quite uncertain. First, there is the I-140 petition. The time it takes to prepare this for filing can depend upon the availability of documents and the speed of action by the employer, employee, and attorney. I-140s have to be supported by the employer's financial data and proof that the employee / beneficiary has the required education and work experience. The safer and faster route is to try and gather all or most of this type of documentation in advance, in parallel with the PERM LC filing. It may be necessary, however, to obtain updated financial information that could slow the preparation time. There are no advertising or other time-bound requirements that dictate the time-frame for preparation and filing of the I-140 petition.

At this time, the I-140 petitions are processed by the USCIS Nebraska and Texas Service Centers. A general estimate of the expected processing time can be obtained based upon the Service Center Processing reports, available on the USCIS website and MVP Law Group’s website. The processing time for any particular case can vary, depending upon the service center, whether there is an RFE issued, and general variations from case to case. Typical processing times range from four months to one year. It is possible to expedite most I-140 filings by using premium processing. It is not necessary to have an I-140 approval to file the I-485. This is where the real uncertainty comes about with processing times.

Adjustment of Status - I-485 Application

Once the labor certification is approved, the general procedures allow for concurrent filing of the I-140 and I-485. However, the I-485 cannot be filed unless the priority date is current for the particular case. The I-485 can take some time to prepare, depending upon how much work was done in advance. It is necessary to have a medical exam, which means waiting for a doctor's appointment and test results. It is also necessary to document immigration status history, provide birth and marriage records, and biographical information. Those who are more organized about their documents and have less complicated histories will have an easier time providing what is needed. If documents are needed from abroad, it is best to work on obtaining these well in advance.

It is not always possible to file the I-485 with the I-140 due to unavailability of visa numbers. Essentially, in order to file an I-485, there must be an available visa number in the particular category. This concept of visa unavailability, retrogression, and visa cutoff dates is vital to the understanding of the immigration process at this time.

Possible Delays in Filing Due to Lack of Visa Numbers

So, a person may have an approved labor certification, and even an approved I-140, but not be able to move forward to the I-485 stage. This problem is severe for people from all countries in the employment-based, third preference EB-3 category, and for those from India and China in EB-2. Following labor certification approval, the employer can file the I-140 petition and even obtain its approval without regard to visa number availability. The case will stall at that point, however, until visa numbers are available for the individual's employment-based category so that the I-485 can be filed. This delay could be a few weeks, a few months, or in many cases, a few years or longer. This is why it is virtually impossible to answer the question, "How long will it take to get a green card?"

Possible Delays in Adjudication Due to Retrogression

If a visa number is available and a case is filed, it is still not immune to delays caused by a lack of visa numbers known as retrogression. For an I-485 to be approved there must be a visa number available on the date of the I-485 approval. Thus, if a case is filed while visa numbers are available, and then the cutoff dates move backward, or retrogress, while it is pending, the case will have to wait until the visa numbers become current again. The time delay, again, is an unknown factor. While this tends to be less of a problem with I-485 cases being filed as of this writing, historically, it has been an enormous complication, impacting many cases.

Consular Processing

If one elects to take the route of consular processing, instead of adjustment of status, the analysis is similar. In this event, the I-140 is filed after the labor certification approval. It is then necessary to wait for the I-140 approval to move forward. The processing time ultimately depends upon how quickly the case moves through to an appointment at the particular consulate. This is generally a number of months, perhaps between four to eight months. A case cannot be approved at the consulate for an immigrant visa, however, unless there is a visa number available. Therefore, consular cases are also delayed by retrogression, and are held at the National Visa Center (NVC) awaiting visa number availability.

Other Variations

There are numerous other matters that can cause variations in processing times. Receipt of requests for evidence (RFEs), can slow the processing times. Putting aside retrogression, enormous variations in processing times are evident at the various service centers and local USCIS offices. While most employment-based green card cases for professionals are ruled upon at the service centers, some are sent to the local USCIS offices for interview. This can cause additional months of delay.

Green card cases can be complex, and anyone who is contemplating filing a green card case should consult with our knowledgeable and experienced attorneys at MVP Law Group in advance of filing.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 31, 2012

August 27, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 31, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 17, 2012

August 13, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 17, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

August 10, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 16 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 20 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 12 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 32 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 3, 2012

July 30, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 3, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

July 23, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on July 19, 2012 with processing dates as of May 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, July 20, 2012

July 20, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – General
Is it necessary that I have someone sponsoring me when I apply for a visa?

Answer #1
It depends, as almost all types of visas require sponsorship whether employment based or family based.


Question #2 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B
Next year I will be traveling to India, so while returning do I need to go for fresh Visa Stamping with new H-1B sponsors approval notice or I can come with the old Visa Stamp (with old employer) as my current visa is valid till Mar 2014? Kindly advise.

Answer #2
You can come back to the United States based upon the valid visa stamp in your passport; however, upon appearing before a CBP Officer, you will present the new I-129 approval from the new H1B sponsor.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa
Will a criminal conviction impair my ability to receive a temporary visa?

Answer #3
It depends upon the type of criminal conviction. Depending upon the seriousness of the criminal conviction, it is possible to be inadmissible and/or deportable for certain criminal convictions – crimes of moral turpitude, crimes involving domestic violence.


Question #4 – Green Card
My EB-3 priority date is October 25, 2006 and I have a pending I-485 application filed back in July 2007 when all categories were current. My fiancé and I are getting married in January 2013. Since my I-485 is not approved yet, I heard that it is possible to include her in my green card application so that both of us can get our green cards when my priority date is current. Is that true? If so, when and how should I start the process?

Answer #4
You will need to wait for your priority date to become current before you are able to file your spouses’ I-485, Adjustment of Status application.


Question #5 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B
My company is considering merging with another company, if we do merge, will we need to file amended petitions for each nonimmigrant worker to be in compliance? I will still remain President of the organization, and the workers will remain in their respective positions and nothing else will change except for the name of the company. Please advise.

Answer #5
Under the Visa Waiver Permanent Act of October 2000, a person is no longer required to file an H1B amendment after a merger, consolidation or other corporate restructuring in many cases if the new job is identical to the prior job before the merger, etc. We would recommend the applicant carry a letter explaining the merger for travel purposes.


Question #6 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B
What types of questions are asked during the H1-B visa application interview process?

Answer #6
During the interview the Immigration Officer has the authority to ask questions regarding the applicant’s educational background, experience, the sponsoring employer, vendor/end client, if applicable, and any information contained in the submitted H-1B petition. Accordingly, you should be thoroughly familiar with this information.


Question #7 – Naturalization/CitizenshipWhat are the eligibility requirements to apply for naturalization?

Answer #7
The general requirements for administrative naturalization include: a period of continuous residence and physical presence in the United States (if LPR – period of 5 years; if LPR spouse of U.S. Citizen – period of 3 years); an ability to read, write and speak English; a knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government; Good moral character; attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution; and favorable disposition toward the United States.


Question #8 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B
Can more than one (1) employer file a temporary (part-time) H1B visa application on my behalf at the same time? For a part time H1B worker, what is the minimum number of hours per week and days per week of work required to be eligible for maintaining the part-time H1B visa status?

Answer #8
Simply put, yes more than one employer can file a temporary part-time H-1B visa application for you during the same time period, as long as a certified LCA covering the jurisdiction of employment is obtained and the I-129 petition and additional supporting documentation reflects this part-time period. 40 hours + per week would be considered a full time employee, therefore, anything less than 40 hours per week would be considered part-time.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B
If I plan to continue working for my employer in the United States, at what point should I apply for an extension?

Answer #9
For the H-1B (Specialty Occupation) nonimmigrant visa, you are able to apply for an extension at least 6 months prior to the visa’s expiration date.


Question #10 – General
Can you obtain permanent residence outside of the country in which you intend to be a resident?

Answer #10
Yes, this process is called Consular Processing. After the necessary forms are filed and approved by the USCIS, an individual will be scheduled for and attend a visa interview at a U.S. Consulate abroad where a Consular Officer will decide within their discretion if an applicant is eligible to receive the requested benefit.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, August 3rd, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, July 20, 2012

July 16, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 20, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

July 12, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of July 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 17 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 12 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, July 6, 2012

July 3, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMERS, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 6th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, June 8, 2012

June 4, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, June 8th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, May 25, 2012

May 25, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Employment Based Green Card
Does an approved labor certification allow me the legal right to work within the U.S.?

Answer #1
No. An approved labor certification only allows your employer to file an EB-2 or EB-3 category immigration petition on your behalf.


Question #2 – Permanent Residence
Can I work in India while holding US green card and not jeopardize my naturalization process in US?

Answer #2
There are various eligibility requirements to qualify for Naturalization - Be 18 or older; Be a green card holder for at least 5 years immediately preceding the date of filing the Form N-400, Application for Naturalization; Have lived within the state, or USCIS district with jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence, for at least 3 months prior to the date of filing the application; Have continuous residence in the United States as a green card holder for at least 5 years immediately preceding the date of the filing the application; Be physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the 5 years immediately preceding the date of filing the application; Reside continuously within the United States from the date of application for naturalization up to the time of naturalization; Be able to read, write, and speak English and have knowledge and an understanding of U.S. history and government (civics); Be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States during all relevant periods under the law.

Additionally, if you remain outside of the U.S. for a period of one year or longer, Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) does have the authority to question you and may take your Green Card, as they consider trips of 1 year or longer without a re-entry permit, abandonment of Lawful Permanent Residence in the United States.


Question #3 – Employment Based Green Card
What is the difference between a labor certification and a work permit?

Answer #3
A work permit or Employment Authorization Document (EAD) is a document that the USCIS issues to aliens stating that they are eligible to work on a temporary basis within the U.S. In contrast, a labor certification DOES NOT give the alien authorization to work within the U.S. Rather, it deals with future employment. Instead, a labor certification is the first step that allows the employer to file an immigration petition on the alien’s behalf.


Question #4 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Any H1Bs left?

Answer #4
As of May 18, 2012, there were approximately 42,000 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas filed and 16,000 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas filed. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.


Question #5 – Employment Based Green Card
Does an approved PERM labor certification provide me legal status within the U. S.?

Answer #5
No. It will, however, often provide the foundation for a later filing that can afford you legal status in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident (green card holder).


Question #6 – General
How can I check the status of my application with Immigration Services?

Answer #6
There are two ways in which to check the status of your application with the USCIS. You may contact the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 and speak with a Customer Service Representative. Or, you may go to www.uscis.gov and enter your receipt number into the case status box on the left hand side of the website.


Question #7 – Family Based Green Card
If my child is a U.S citizen can I obtain legal status in the U.S?

Answer #7
You cannot obtain legal status in the U.S. from your child until your child reaches the age of 21.


Question #8 – Employment Based Green Card
I have a part-time job and my employer agrees to file a PERM labor certification application on my behalf. Does a part-time position qualify for PERM labor certification?

Answer #8
No. The job offer must be for a permanent and full-time position. Part-time positions do not qualify. Please note, however, that the permanent and full-time requirements are for the future position when permanent residency is granted. You are not required to work full time at the time the labor certification petition is filed.


Question #9 – Employment Based Green Card
How much is the DOL filing fee for a PERM labor certification application?

Answer #9
No DOL filing fee is required for a PERM labor certification application.


Question #10 – General
Do I have to notify Immigration if I change my address?

Answer #10
Most non-U.S. citizens must report a change of address with the USCIS within 10 days of moving within the United States or its territories. Exceptions include: Diplomats (visa status A), Official government representatives to an international organization (visa status G), and Certain nonimmigrants who do not possess a visa and who are in the U.S. for fewer than 30 days. You may report a change of address by filing Form AR-11 either electronically or by mail with the USCIS.

MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, June 8, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

Updated Service Center Processing Times

May 22, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on May 16, 2012 with processing dates as of March 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, May 11, 2012

May 7, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, May 11th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

May 4, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of May 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 18 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 21 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 34 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, April 27, 2012

April 27, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
How many H1s are left?

Answer #1
According to the USCIS, H-1B petitions being filed subject to the CAP have doubled since this time last year. As of April 20, 2012, there were approximately 25,000 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas filed and 10,900 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas filed. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #2 – Permanent Residence
If my permanent resident card has expired, do I need a visa? Or is it possible to renew my permanent residence?

Answer #2
A green card is valid for a period of 10 years; you may renew 6 months prior to its expiration. You may renew your green card by filing Form I-90 with the USCIS.


Question #3 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Regarding a change of job, is there a recommended wait time after the green card that I can change my employer. On the EAD there was a 6mth after which I could do this, but was wondering after the GC if there is any such thing. Appreciate your response.

Answer #3
Although the regulations are silent on this issue, we recommend that you wait at least six (6) months before changing your employer to avoid issues if you intend on applying for citizenship when you become eligible.


Question #4 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
What qualifies me as an “exempt H-1B employee”?

Answer #4
An exempt H-1B nonimmigrant is an H-1B worker who meets one of the following statutory standards: (1) receives at least $60,000 in annual wages; or (2) has attained a master’s or higher degree (or its equivalent) in a specialty related to the intended H-1B employment.


Question #5 – Family Based Immigration
Who is responsible for scheduling the visa immigrant Interview, us or the Consulate? My husband’s I-130 was just approved and just curious to know what we need to do next.

Answer #5
The National Visa Center (NVC) will be in contact with you to instruct you to pay the immigrant visa fee, prepare necessary forms and gather appropriate documents. Once the NVC has everything they need, they will forward the case to the Consulate. You will receive a notice of the date, time and place of the scheduled interview.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I got my I-140 petition approved. Next step is to apply for AOS. What kind of document do I need to have for AOS application?

Answer #6
In order to apply for AOS, your priority date needs to be current, once your priority date is current, you will able to file the Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident along with the Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document. There are numerous background documents that will need to be submitted along with your petition, specifically, a sealed medical examination from a civil surgeon in your area, birth certificates, copies of federal tax returns, bank statements, and an employment verification letter, among other documents.


Question #7 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I heard that even though I submitted my I-485 because my priority date was current, there is no chance of getting my green card within the next six months?

Answer #7
What you heard is correct, if you are an applicant from India or China-mainland born, and your I-140 was filed under the Employment based second preference classification.

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) confirmed with the State Department that the annual limit in the EB-2 category for China-mainland born and India had been reached as of April 11, 2012. USCIS will continue to accept adjustment applications based upon cut-off dates published in the April and May Visa Bulletins. However, requests from USCIS service centers and field offices for visas in the EB-2 category aliens chargeable to China-mainland born or India will be retained by DOS for authorization in FY2013, beginning on October 1, 2012.


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
We filed a labor application and it was approved for a software engineer. We have not received the certified labor application in the mail (approved several weeks ago) and wish to move to the next step, file the I-140. What can we do?

Answer #8
Generally, there are two options available to you; however, both are rather similar. The recommended route is to file the I-140 petition with a request that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) obtain the certified Labor from the Department of Labor (DOL) itself. The other option is to write a letter to the DOL notifying them that the USCIS will be requesting the certified Labor from them directly for purposes of filing the I-140 petition.


Question #9 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Is an approved I-765 any indication that the I-485 is getting close to approval and would eventually BE approved without a hitch or are they autonomous processes?

Answer #9
They are separate and distinct creatures. Therefore, to put it simply, an approved I-765 is not an indication that the I-485 is getting closer to being approved.


Question #10 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
My name is mistakenly typed in the form I-129 submitted to USCIS. In that form only, in all other forms (including I-129 supplements) it has typed correctly. Name mistyped on I-129, so reflecting wrong name on I-797, what I need to do now?

Answer #10
If you believe that the mistake on your I-129 receipt notice (Form I-797) would cause severe issues down the road, you will need to contact the USCIS National Customer Service number (1-800-375-5283) and speak with an Agent to request that the mistake be corrected, so that your I-129 Approval notice (Form I-797) will provide the correct spelling of your name.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, May 11, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

Updated Service Center Processing Times

April 24, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on April 23, 2012 with processing dates as of February 29, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, April 27, 2012

April 23, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, April 27th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

AILA and Partners to Help Thousands Apply for Citizenship on Saturday, April 21st

April 20, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC - The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) is proud to sponsor the 6th annual Citizenship Day on Saturday, April 21, 2012. This single-day workshop with sites around the country provides assistance to lawful permanent residents eligible for naturalization. In partnership with the "ya es hora ¡Ciudadanía!" campaign, AILA will hold 50 naturalization clinics in 18 states serving thousands of immigrants who are preparing to become citizens. "Our annual Citizenship Day is an event all AILA members can support. Collectively, we work with individuals from all over the world who are all striving to come to the U.S., and many of those individuals wish to stay here to make a life for themselves and for their families. It is an honor to help those immigrants finalize their status to become American Citizens," said AILA President Eleanor Pelta.

As a one-day, nationwide event, AILA Citizenship Day provides free or low-cost assistance to eligible legal permanent residents who wish to apply for U.S. citizenship, utilizing partnerships between AILA chapters across the country and the grassroots campaign "ya es hora ¡Ciudadanía!" In 2012, AILA Citizenship Day will celebrate its 6th anniversary on a national scale and its 4th year working with the campaign.

AILA's successes are due in large part to the national collaborative relationships that AILA has developed both with community organizations and stakeholders, as well as the USCIS Office of Citizenship. "As individual attorneys, our daily professional work is life changing. When we join together to help a community we are a force to be reckoned with; we can make such a huge difference," said Susan Timmons, Associate Director of AILA's Practice and Professionalism Center. "Coordinating Citizenship Day with our partners grants AILA members the opportunity to reach an exponentially larger group. Together, we help hard working residents become citizens of the United States - we help them realize the American dream."

AILA Citizenship Day was awarded the 2008 Award of Excellence in the "Associations Advance America" awards program, a national competition sponsored by the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) and The Center for Association Leadership.

Citizenship Clinics will be held in Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Washington, D.C.

CONTACTS:
George Tzamaras or Amanda Walkins
202-507-7649 / 202-507-7618
gtzamaras@aila.org / awalkins@aila.org

The American Immigration Lawyers Association is the national association of immigration lawyers established to promote justice, advocate for fair and reasonable immigration law and policy, advance the quality of immigration and nationality law and practice, and enhance the professional development of its members.

Source: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 12041942 (posted Apr. 19, 2012)"

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, April 13, 2012

April 10, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, April 13th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

April 4, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of April 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 20 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 23 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 36 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, March 30, 2012

March 30, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
I had h1b approved on 8/31/2011. Went to US embassy in Amman, Jordan on 9/21/2011 and still pending administrative processing till now. Any advices or timeline to get cleared.

Answer #1
You may contact the Consulate itself, or request that your Attorney contact the Consulate. Administrative Processing can take as little as a few weeks to several months.


Question #2 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
My Optional Practical Training just got declined, I have yet not received the hard copy but, I think the reason is because of my college. Some of my friends also got denial for the opt. Can you please give me some suggestion regarding my opt, can I reapply or can I apply for H1 as H1 will open in April.

Answer #2
You will want to wait and find out the reason the application was denied. You will also want to speak with your school Counselor about the reason for denial. You should speak with an Immigration Attorney concerning the specifics of your case to get a better understanding of any available options remaining.


Question #3 – Naturalization
Please let me know where there are information sessions near Orlando, FL for naturalization info.

Answer #3
Please monitor the following website to find out the next information sessions conducted by the USICS in Orlando, FL.


Question #4 – Student Visa (F1)
I am currently on OPT (F1 Visa) I am planning to get married in this December. Can I bring my wife to USA on dependent visa (F2 Visa) while I am on OPT (F1 Visa) status?

Answer #4
The F2 is reserved for spouse and children of the F1 visa holder. It depends upon a majority of factors – time remaining on OPT, sufficient funds to provide for you and your spouse, proof of intent to return to your home country, etc.


Question #5 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
What is the difference between having H-1B status and having an H-1B visa?

Answer #5
H-1B status generally refers to your legal status while in the United States, as the moment you exit the U.S., you are no longer considered in H-1B status. An H-1B visa is a stamp that you receive in your passport when a Consular Officer approves your H-1B petition at a U.S. Consulate overseas. The valid H-1B visa stamp allows you to enter the U.S. as an H-1B nonimmigrant in H-1B visa status.


Question #6 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
What is the new 'displacement' or 'no lay-off' attestation rule and how does it apply for those using the H-1B visa?

Answer #6
It is not a new rule. If an employer is H-1B dependent or has been found to have willfully violated their H-1B obligations, the employer has additional attestation obligations regarding the displacement of U.S. workers and its recruitment efforts in addition to the general employer requirements for H-1B visa petitions. H-1B dependent employers who are hiring a non-exempt H-1B employer must declare that they will not displace or lay-off a U.S. worker "in an equivalent job" either within its own workforce or that of another employer. The employer must also make a good faith effort to recruit U.S. workers for the position using industry-wide standards before hiring an H-1B worker.


Question #7 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Can an H-1B dependent employer sponsor my H-1B visa?

Answer #7
Yes.


Question #8 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
If am I fired while on an H-1B visa, can I remain in the U.S. for the duration of my visa, or do I need to apply for another visa?

Answer #8
If fired by your employer prior to the end of the duration of your visa status, your employer is responsible for paying your reasonable travel costs back to your home country. You cannot remain in the U.S. for the duration of your visa. You may apply for another visa (i.e., H4 if you have a spouse in the country on H-1B, etc.) or you must exit the country.


Question #9 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
What factors determine the prevailing wage for an H-1B beneficiary?

Answer #9
There are several factors: Job Title, work experience, education experience, location of Job opportunity, wage of similar situated employees of employer with similar qualifications and experience, etc.


Question #10 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Can I change my job while I am under the H-1B visa?

Answer #10
Yes, the petition would be referred to as an H-1B transfer. You are allowed to change jobs if you find a new and willing H-1B sponsoring employer. You must file the new H-1B transfer case with the USCIS.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, April 13, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 30, 2012

March 26, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 30th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

March 21, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on March 20, 2012 with processing dates as of January 31, 2012.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 16, 2012

March 12, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 16th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 6, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 21 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 2, 2012

February 27, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 2nd, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

February 22, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on February 21, 2012 with processing dates as of December 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, February 17, 2012

February 13, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, February 17th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

January 31, 2012

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on January 25, 2012 with processing dates as of November 30, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, February 3, 2012

January 30, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, February 3rd, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, January 20, 2012

January 16, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, January 20th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, January 6, 2012

January 3, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, January 6th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, December 23, 2011

December 19, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, December 23rd, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

December 15, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of December 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 32 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, December 9, 2011

December 5, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, December 9th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, November 25, 2011

November 21, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, November 25th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

November 16, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on November 14, 2011 with processing dates as of September 30, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

November 9, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of November 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 31 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, November 11, 2011

November 7, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, November 11th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Round-Up of Immigration Related Legislation (August-October 2011)

November 3, 2011

The following immigration-related bills were introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate in August 2011-October 2011 and summarized below by AILA (American Immigration Lawyers Association):

Senate Bills

S. 1506
Introduced by Sen. Rubio (R-FL) on 8/2/11
Prevents the Secretary of the Treasury from expanding United States bank reporting requirements with respect to interest on deposits paid to nonresident aliens.

S. 1545
Introduced by Sen. Inhofe (R-OK) on 9/13/11
Designates Taiwan as a visa waiver program country under INA Section 217(c).

S. 1576
Introduced by Sen. Landrieu (D-LA) on 9/19/11
Measures the progress of relief, recovery, reconstruction and development efforts in Haiti following the earthquake of Jan. 12, 2010, and for other purposes.

House Bills

Strengthening the Child Welfare Response to Human Trafficking Act of 2011 (HR 2730)
Introduced by Rep. Bass (D-CA) on 8/1/11
Better enables State child welfare agencies to prevent human trafficking of children and serve the needs of children who are victims of human trafficking.

H.R. 2763
Introduced by Rep. McDermott (D-WA); Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) on 8/1/11
Extends by two years the special rule relating to eligibility for benefits under the supplemental security income program for certain aliens and victims of trafficking. Amends section 402(a)(2)(M) of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

H.R. 2771
Introduced by Rep. Rivera (R-FL) on 8/1/11
Amends Public Law 89-732 to increase to 5 years the period during which a Cuban national must be physically present in the United States in order to qualify for adjustment of status to that of a permanent resident

Doctors for Underserved Areas in America Act (H.R. 2805)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 8/5/11
Amends Section 220 of the Immigration and Nationality Technical Corrections Act of 1994 to make the section permanent.

Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2011 (H.R. 2830)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-NJ) on 8/30/11
Authorizes appropriations for fiscal years 2012 and 2013 for the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.

H.R. 2831
Introduced by Rep. Rivera (R-FL)on 8/30/11
Amends Cuban Refugee Adjustment Act to make ineligible for adjustment of status under Section 1 individuals who return to Cuba after admission or parole into the U.S.

American Specialty Agriculture Act (H.R. 2847)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-TX) on 9/7/11
Establishes a H-2C nonimmigrant visa for an alien having residence in a foreign country which he or she has no intention of abandoning and who is coming temporarily (10-month maximum per contract period) to the United States to perform agricultural services, including the pressing of apples for cider on a farm. Requires an employer or employer association to file an H-2C petition.

Compassionate Visa for Medical Treatment Act (H.R. 2878)
Introduced by Rep. Cohen (D-TN) on 9/9/11
Amends INA with respect to temporary admission of nonimmigrant aliens for the purpose of receiving medical treatment.

Legal Workforce Act (H.R. 2885)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-TX) on 9/12/11
Makes mandatory and permanent requirements for use of E-Verify for employment verification.

Legal Agricultural Workforce Act(H.R. 2895)
Introduced by Rep. Lungren (R-CA) on 9/12/11
Amends INA to provide for a temporary agricultural worker program.

Chinese Media Reciprocity Act of 2011(H.R. 2899)
Introduced by Rep. Rohrabacher (R-CA) on 9/12/11
Establishes a reciprocal relationship between the number of visas issued to state-controlled media workers in China and in the U.S.

Immigration Backlog Reduction Act of 2011(H.R. 2952)
Introduced by Rep. Hunter (R-CA) on 9/15/11
Provides for expedited removal of certain aliens.

Senior Citizenship Act of 2011 (H.R. 2957)
Introduced by Rep. Nadler (D-NY) on 9/15/11
Amends INA to exempt certain elderly persons (75+ years; 5 years as LPR) from demonstrating an understanding of the English language and the history/government of the United States as a requirement for naturalization. The bill also permits other elderly persons (65+ years; 5 years LPR) to take the history and government examination in a language of their choice.

Restoring Protection to Victims of Persecution Act (HR 2981)
Introduced by Rep. Stark (D-CA) on 9/21/11
Amends the INA to eliminate the 1-year deadline for application for asylum in the United States.

Illegal Immigration Sentencing Uniformity Act of 2011 (HR 2991)
Introduced by Rep. Culberson (R-TX) on 9/21/11
Disapproves of a certain sentencing guideline amendment submitted by the United States Sentencing Commission, and for other purposes.

Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act (HR 3012)
Introduced by Rep. Chaffetz (R-UT) on 9/22/11
Eliminates the per-country numerical limitation for employment-based immigrants, and increases the per-country numerical limitation for family-sponsored immigrants.

SSI Extension for Elderly and Disabled Refugees Act of 2011(H.R. 3083)
Introduced by Rep. McDermott (D-WA) on 10/3/11
Extends eligibility period for supplemental security income benefits for refugees, asylees, and certain other humanitarian immigrants.

Protecting American Families and Businesses Act of 2011(H.R. 3119)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 10/6/11
Amends the INA to remove the per-country limitation on employment-based immigrant visas and adjusts the per-country limitation on family-sponsored immigrant visas.

Student Visa Reform Act (H.R. 3120)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 10/6/11
Amends the INA to require accreditation of certain educational institutions for purposes of a nonimmigrant student visa.

H.R. 3162
Introduced by Rep. Alexander (R-LA) on 10/12/11
Prohibits the Secretary of Labor from implementing certain rules relating to employment of aliens described in section 101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Illegal Alien Crime Reporting Act of 2011 (H.R. 3168)
Introduced by Rep. Jones (R-NC) on 10/12/11
Prohibits the payment of funds to a state under any program by DHS unless the state 1. compiles statistics on persons arrested, charged, convicted or incarcerated, including immigration status and country of origin; 2. reports such statistics monthly to the FBI; and 3. certifies compliance with requirements of this Act.

Source: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11110234 (posted Nov. 2, 2011)"

USCIS to return to existing process of sending I-797 Originals to G-28 Attorneys on Record

October 25, 2011

USCIS Director, Alejandro N. Mayorkas has announced that the USCIS will resume the existing process of sending all I-797 original notices to the G-28 Attorney on Record and not the Employer. The Employer will receive only courtesy copies. Director Mayorkas made this decision after receiving valuable feedback from USCIS Stakeholders. Unfortunately, this change will not go into effect for another six weeks due to programming issues.

A year ago, USCIS initiated an internal system change that altered where we send receipt
notices (I-797). Last month, when the change went into effect, we heard from
stakeholders that this change had an unintended negative external impact. We scheduled
a stakeholder meeting, gained an understanding of the impact, and have decided to return
to our previous practice of sending the original notice to the attorney or accredited
representative’s address listed on the Form G-28. A copy will be sent to the address
provided by the applicant or petitioner in the applicable form. This change will take
effect in approximately six weeks due to the need to re-program our system. We
appreciate the feedback you provided.

I look forward to continued collaboration with you on matters of importance to our
nation’s economic prosperity and those whom we serve.

Alejandro N. Mayorkas
Director
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Department of Homeland Security

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, October 28th, 2011

October 24, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, October 28th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

October 20, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on October 18th, 2011 with processing dates as of August 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, October 14th, 2011

October 10, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, October 14th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 30th, 2011

September 26, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 30th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

September 20, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on September 16th, 2011 with processing dates as of July 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 16th, 2011

September 12, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 16th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Round-Up of Immigration Related Legislation (July-August 2011)

August 30, 2011

The following immigration-related bills were introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate in July-August 2011 and summarized below by AILA (American Immigration Lawyers Association):

Senate Bills

Immigration Fraud Prevention Act of 2011 - S. 1336
Introduced by Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) on 7/7/11
Summary: Prevents immigration fraud by making it a Federal crime to defraud individuals in connection with any matter arising under immigration laws.

Hinder the Administration's Legalization Temptation (HALT) Act - S. 1380
Introduced by Sen. Vitter (R-LA) on 7/12/11
Summary: Suspends until Jan. 21, 2013 certain provisions of federal immigration law.

Trafficking in Persons Report Improvement Act of 2011 - S. 1362
Introduced by Sen. Webb (D-VA) on 7/13/11
Summary: Simplifies the Trafficking in Persons Report by reducing the number of country categories and ranking countries within each category according to their relative adherence to the minimum standards set forth in TVPA of 2000.

Helping Agriculture Receive Verifiable Employees Securely and Temporarily (HARVEST) Act of 2011 - S. 1384
Introduced by Sen. Chambliss (R-GA) on 7/19/11
Summary: Amends the INA to provide for the temporary employment of foreign agricultural workers.

Humane Enforcement and Legal Protections for (HELP) Separated Children Act - S. 1399
Introduced by Sen. Franken (D-MN) on 7/21/11
Summary: Protects children affected by immigration enforcement actions.

S. 1405
Introduced by Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) on 7/21/11
Summary: Private bill for the relief of Guy Privat Tape and Lou Nazie Raymonde Toto.

House Bills

H.R. 2805
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 8/5/11
Summary: Amends Section 220 of the Immigration and Nationality Technical Corrections Act of 1994 to make permanent made by the section.

Strengthening the Child Welfare Response to Human Trafficking Act of 2011- H.R. 2730
Introduced by Rep. Bass (D-CA) on 8/1/11
Summary: Amends Part E of Title IV of the Social Security Act to better enable State child welfare agencies to prevent human trafficking of children and serve the needs of children who are victims of human trafficking.

Hinder the Administration's Legalization Temptation (HALT) Act - H.R. 2497
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-TX) on 7/12/11
Summary: Suspends until Jan. 21, 2013 certain provisions of federal immigration law.

H.R. 2556
Introduced by Rep. Ryan (D-OH) on 7/15/11
Summary: Suspends the issuance of visas to nationals of Brazil until Brazil amends it laws to remove the prohibition on extradition of nationals of Brazil to other countries.

Humane Enforcement and Legal Protections for (HELP) Separated Children Act - H.R. 2607
Introduced by Rep. Woolsey (D-CA) on 7/21/11
Summary: Protects children affected by immigration enforcement actions.

Military Families Act - H.R. 2638
Introduced by Rep. Filner (D-CA) on 7/25/11
Summary: Authorizes the adjustment of status for immediate family members of individuals who served honorably in the Armed Forces of the United States during the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts.

Jobs for Americans Act of 2011 - H.R. 2670
Introduced by Rep. Brooks (R-AL) 7/27/11
Summary: Provides that States and local government may pass laws that identify illegal aliens, deter illegal aliens from entering the United States, apprehend illegal aliens, or encourage or otherwise cause illegal aliens to leave the United States.

H.R. 2556
Introduced by Rep. Ryan (D-OH) on 7/15/11
Summary: Prohibits the issuance of a visa to a citizen, subject, national, or resident of Brazil until Brazil has removed the prohibition on extradition of Brazilian nationals to other countries. The bill authorizes the President to waive such prohibition on a case-by-case basis if in the U.S. national interest.

Source: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11082563 (posted Aug. 25, 2011)"

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 2nd, 2011

August 29, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 2nd, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

August 18, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on August 17th, 2011 with processing dates as of June 30, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data provided above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 19th, 2011

August 15, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 19th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Changing Your Address with USCIS/DOS/EOIR/BIA

July 29, 2011

Changing an address with the various Federal immigration agencies can be confusing, and failure to properly make an address change can lead to denials and other adverse immigration consequences. The Ombudsman's Office encourages immigration benefits applicants and petitioners to promptly notify U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), the U.S. Department of State (DOS), and/or the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) of any change in address.

USCIS, DOS, EOIR and DOL have separate procedures, filing locations, and timeframes for submitting an address change. A change of address should be reported for each application type, petition, case, and family member with each government agency from which an immigration benefit is being sought. Applicants should use the most permanent address available. To view the chart provided by the Department of Homeland Security, please click here.


USCIS - Change of Address Requirements: Differences between U.S. citizens and non-U.S. citizens

U.S. Citizens
Not required by law, but it's important that you report a change of address for pending cases.

Online: USCIS Online Change of Address
OR
By phone: 1-800-375-5283.


Non-U.S. Citizens
By law, you must complete Form AR-11 to report any change in permanent address within 10 days.

Online: USCIS Online Change of Address (recommended)*
AND
By mail: Download Form AR-11 and Instructions


Note penalty: Willful failure to give written notice to USCIS of a change of address within 10 days is a misdemeanor crime, and could also jeopardize the ability to obtain a future immigration benefit.


*The Ombudsman recommends reporting changes of address online. U.S. citizens will be brought directly to the page where they may update their address for any pending USCIS applications or petitions. Non-U.S. citizens will first be required to report changes of address by completing an electronic Form AR-11 (PDF, 1 page - 370 KB), and thereafter may separately update their address for pending cases.

Information Provided By: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Updated Service Center Processing Times

July 21, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on July 20th, 2011 with processing dates as of May 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, July 22nd, 2011

July 18, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 22nd, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Round-Up of Immigration Related Legislation (June 2011)

July 11, 2011

The following immigration-related bills were introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate in June 2011 and summarized below by AILA (American Immigration Lawyers Association):

Senate Bills

Protect Our Workers from Exploitation and Retaliation (POWER) Act (S. 1195)
Introduced by Sen. Menendez (D-NJ) on 6/14/11
Summary: Amends the INA to exclude from the definition of "immigrant" under such Act a nonimmigrant alien who files a petition for status if the Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) determines that the alien: (1) has suffered abuse or harm as a result of having been a victim of criminal activity; (2) has suffered substantial abuse or harm related to specified labor or employment violations related to a workplace claim (workplace violation); (3) is a victim of specified criminal activity and would suffer extreme hardship upon removal; (4) has suffered a workplace violation and would suffer extreme hardship upon removal; (5) has been helpful to a local judge, DHS, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Department of Labor, or the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) or to other authorities investigating, prosecuting, or seeking civil remedies for workplace violation; or (6) has filed, is a material witness in, or is likely to be helpful in the investigation of, a bona fide workplace claim and reasonably fears, has been threatened with, or has been the victim of, an action involving force, physical restraint, retaliation, or abuse of the immigration or other legal process by the employer in relation to acts underlying or related to the filing of the claim.
Authorizes the Secretary of DHS to permit certain aliens to remain temporarily in the United States. Sets forth protections in an enforcement action leading to a removal proceeding taken against certain aliens.

Accountability Through Electronic Verification Act (S. 1196)
Introduced by Sen. Grassley (R-IA) on 6/14/11
Summary: Expands the use of E-Verify.

Refugee Protection Act of 2011 (S. 1202)
Introduced by Sen. Leahy (D-VT) on 6/15/11
Summary: Amends the INA to reaffirm the United States' historic commitment to protecting refugees who are fleeing persecution or torture.

Border Tunnel Prevention Act of 2011 (S. 1236)
Introduced by Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) on 6/20/11
Summary: Deters the construction and use of border tunnels to reduce the trafficking of drugs and to prevent human smuggling across the Southwest Border.

S. 1258
Introduced by Sen. Menendez (D-NJ) on 6/22/11
Summary: Provides for comprehensive immigration reform.

Trafficking Victims Enhanced Protection Act of 2011 (S. 1259)
Introduced by Sen. Durbin (D-IL) on 6/22/11
Summary: Amends the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 to prohibit the provision of peacekeeping operations assistance to governments of countries that recruit and use child soldiers.

Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2011 (S. 1301)
Introduced by Sen. Leahy (D-VT) on 6/29/11
Summary: Authorizes appropriations for fiscal years 2012 to 2015 for the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, to enhance measures to combat trafficking in person

House Bills

IDEA Act of 2011 (H.R. 2161)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 6/14/11
Summary: Immigration Driving Entrepreneurship in America Act of 2011. Amends the INA to promote innovation, investment, and research in the United States.

Legal Workforce Act (H.R. 2164)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-TX) on 6/14/11
Summary: Amends the INA to make mandatory and permanent requirements relating to the use of an electronic employment eligibility verification system.

Protect Our Workers from Exploitation and Retaliation (POWER) Act (H.R. 2169)
Introduced by Rep. Chu (D-CA) on 6/14/11
Summary: Amends the INA to exclude from the definition of "immigrant" under such Act a nonimmigrant alien who files a petition for status if the Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) determines that the alien: (1) has suffered abuse or harm as a result of having been a victim of criminal activity; (2) has suffered substantial abuse or harm related to specified labor or employment violations related to a workplace claim (workplace violation); (3) is a victim of specified criminal activity and would suffer extreme hardship upon removal; (4) has suffered a workplace violation and would suffer extreme hardship upon removal; (5) has been helpful to a local judge, DHS, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Department of Labor, or the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) or to other authorities investigating, prosecuting, or seeking civil remedies for workplace violation; or (6) has filed, is a material witness in, or is likely to be helpful in the investigation of, a bona fide workplace claim and reasonably fears, has been threatened with, or has been the victim of, an action involving force, physical restraint, retaliation, or abuse of the immigration or other legal process by the employer in relation to acts underlying or related to the filing of the claim. Authorizes the Secretary of DHS to permit certain aliens to remain temporarily in the United States. Sets forth protections in an enforcement action leading to a removal proceeding taken against certain aliens.

Refugee Protection Act of 2011 (H.R. 2185)
Introduced by Rep. Lofgren (D-CA) on 6/15/11
Summary: Amends the INA to reaffirm the United States' historic commitment to protecting refugees who are fleeing persecution or torture.

Deport Convicted Foreign Criminals Act (H.R. 2199)
Introduced by Rep. Poe (R-TX) on 6/15/11
Summary: Prohibits the issuance of certain visas to nationals of a country that denies or unreasonably delays the repatriation of a national ordered removed from the United States to such country.

Child Trafficking Victims Protection Act (H.R. 2235)
Introduced by Rep. Roybal-Allard (D-CA) on 6/16/11
Summary: Provides enhanced protections for vulnerable unaccompanied alien children and female detainees.

Border Tunnel Prevention Act of 2011 (H.R. 2264)
Introduced by Rep. Reyes (D-TX) on 6/21/11
Summary: Deters the construction and use of border tunnels to reduce the trafficking of drugs and to prevent human smuggling across the Southwest Border.

Torture Victims Relief Reauthorization Act of 2011 (H.R. 2404)
Introduced by Rep. Smith (R-NJ) on 6/28/11
Summary: Amends the Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998 to authorize appropriations to provide assistance for domestic and foreign programs and centers for the treatment of victims of torture.

Source:"AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11070672 (posted Jul. 6, 2011)"

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, July 8th, 2011

July 8, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My company is considering merging with another company, if we do merge, will we need to file amended petitions for each nonimmigrant worker to remain in compliance? I will still remain head of the organization, and the workers will remain in their respective positions and nothing else will change except for the name of the company. Please advise.

Answer #1
Under the Visa Waiver Permanent Act of October 2000, a person is no longer required to file an H1B amendment after a merger, consolidation or other corporate restructuring in many cases if the new job is identical to the prior job before the merger, etc. We would recommend the applicant carry a letter explaining the merger for travel purposes.


Question #2 – Naturalization/Citizenship
What are the eligibility requirements to apply for naturalization?

Answer #2
The general requirements for administrative naturalization include: a period of continuous residence and physical presence in the United States (if LPR – period of 5 years; if LPR spouse of U.S. Citizen – period of 3 years); an ability to read, write and speak English; a knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government; Good moral character; attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution; and favorable disposition toward the United States.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
If one has an approved I-140 can employer still have the discretion not to renew one's H1B? Or are they bound by law to petition working visas until one gets the green card?

Answer #3
The employer has the ultimate discretion not to renew/extend an applicant’s H-1B. If the employer no longer wishes to employ the applicant, has decided to terminate the applicant, he may do so; however, if the beneficiary is terminated or otherwise released early, the employer is responsible for paying the associated transportation costs for the beneficiary’s return to his home country.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
How many H-1B nonimmigrant visas remain under the CAP?

Answer #4
As of July 1, 2011, there were approximately 46,600 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 8,100 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #5 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I got my I-140 petition approved. Next step is to apply for AOS. What kind of document I need to have for AOS application?

Answer #5
In order to apply for AOS, your priority date needs to be current, once your priority date is current, you may be able to file the Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident along with the Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document. There are numerous background documents that will need to be submitted along with your petition, specifically, a sealed medical examination from a civil surgeon in your area, birth certificates, copies of federal tax returns, bank statements, and an employment verification letter, among other documents.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I have a question about the work. Can I directly work for my own company now because my I-485 is approved and waiting for getting the Green card? (The card already produced and mailed).

Answer #6
Although the regulations are silent on the issue, our office recommends that you remain with the company that sponsored your Green Card for at least 6 months before moving to a new company or beginning to work for your own. We recommend this frame for applicants interested in applying for Citizenship down the line, as to avoid any unnecessary questions concerning your intent and previous employment.


Question #7 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I have a US green card, but I came to India without filling re-entry permit form as due to recession time not getting jobs even in three months, can I fill from it on India?

Answer #7
If you have a US Green Card, you do not have the have a re-entry permit (the green card itself is your authorization to be in the US), you have the status of a Lawful Permanent Resident and may enter and exit the country based on your U.S. Green Card. Re-entry documents are requested by applicants when their Adjustment petitions (I-485) are pending with the USCIS. Therefore, once you obtain a U.S. Green Card, you are allowed to travel inside and outside the U.S. without having a re-entry permit (Advance Parole document).


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I have an approved I-140 petition and wish to file my I-485. I am currently on H-1B and my wife, H4. She wants to be able to work so we would like to file 485 and obtain EAD documents. My lawyer says I must wait for my priority date to become current. Please explain for me what “priority date becoming current” means? I filed in EB2 category from China.

Answer #8
In order for an individual to obtain an immigrant visa, a visa number must be available to you. This is referred to as the priority date being "current." The priority date is current if there is no backlog in the category, or if the priority date is on or before the date listed as current in the State Department's monthly Visa Bulletin. This Bulletin is accessible at www.travel.state.gov. Currently, there is a backlog in the Employment-Based Second Preference (EB-2) category, which is the category you were filed in. This means, that you must wait until a visa becomes available, until your priority date becomes current. When your priority date becomes current, you may file the I-485 application, but until then, you must wait.

Each month, the State Department issues the visa bulletin, usually in the middle of the month. When the bulletin is issued, it will provide information that will take effect on the first day of the following month. Depending on the availability of immigrant visas, the priority dates in each category and for each country can change each month. However, please note that the priority dates can also stay the same. They can move very slowly or progress by several months or years. They can move forward or backward. Therefore, there is no way to anticipate what the priority date will be in a future month or when a category will become current.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My I-140 was denied and my employer has appealed the decision. My H1 is due to expire next May 2011 as I am currently in my 6th year. Can we apply for H1 extensions based on my pending I-140 appeal? If yes, for 3 years or for 1 year?

Answer #9
Under AC21, yes you may be eligible to file an H-1B extension beyond the six year period if you appealed the denied I-140 in a timely manner (before the deadline). An applicant is eligible to file for H-1B one-year extensions if they have a pending I-140 appeal at the Administration Appeals Office (AAO).


Question #10 – General
How and when do I obtain a Social Security Card?

Answer #10
Generally, you may obtain a Social Security Card once you are legally authorized to work in the United States. Such authorization may be evidenced by receipt of an employment authorization card, an Alien Registration Card (Green Card), or receipt of temporary evidence of Green Card status (as established by presentation of an I-551 stamp in your passport). You will need to file an application for a Social Security Number in person at the Social Security Office. When filing this application at the Social Security Office, you should bring the following documents with you: your original birth certificate, passport, and employment authorization document, stamped passport or Green Card. Call 1-800-772-1213 for further information including the address of your local Social Security office, or visit their website at www.ssa.gov.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, July22nd, 2011! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyer blog.

USCIS Welcomes More than 24,000 New Citizens During Fourth of July Celebrations

July 6, 2011

The USCIS conducted numerous naturalization ceremonies, welcoming more than 24,000 new citizens beginning on June 27 and leading up to July 4th, to commemorate America’s 235th birthday. Eight of the approximate 350 ceremonies were specifically held for members of the U.S. armed forces. The Director of USCIS, Alejandro Mayorkas provided in his remarks that “every Fourth of July, we celebrate our country’s spirit of independence…this spirit, and our founding ideals of freedom and democracy, have allowed us to achieve great success as a nation of immigrants. Immigrants come to America in search of opportunity and, by taking the Oath of Alligence, embrace the rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizenship.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, July 8th, 2011

July 5, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 8th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, June 24th, 2011

June 20, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, June 24th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, June 10th, 2011

June 6, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, June 10th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, May 27th, 2011

May 23, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, May 27th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

May 19, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on May 17, 2011 with processing dates as of March 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, May 13th, 2011

May 9, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, May 13th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, April 29, 2011

April 29, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
How long is the processing of I-140? Will there still be chances of getting I-140 denied even if the worker is labor certified? If yes, what are the grounds?

Answer #1
The processing time for the I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker is approximately 4 – 6 months or longer depending upon the preference category. The processing times are published monthly by the USCIS. For all EB2 and EB3 filings, a certified labor application is required prior to submitting the I-140 Immigrant Petition. Therefore, the grounds for denial or receiving an RFE from the USCIS would be due to the beneficiary’s eligibility – experience and/or education; and/or the petitioner’s ability to pay – company financials.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
How long is the processing of I-485?

Answer #2
The processing time for the I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident is approximately 4-6 months or longer, depending upon the type of I-485 – Employment/ Family Based, etc. However, one must factor in that there are other individuals also waiting for the adjudication of their I-485 application who have earlier priority dates. The processing times are published monthly by the USCIS.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Are there any H1B nonimmigrant visas remaining?

Answer #3
As of April 22, 2011, there were approximately 57,000 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 14,100 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #4 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
I have a U.S. citizen son. At what age can my son petition me for permanent residency? It used to be at age 18. Now it is 20. Is that true?

Answer #4
If the U.S. citizen child is 21 years of age or above, he/she can sponsor his/ her parents for immigration.


Question #5 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Our district lawyer planned to convert my H-1B exempt to H-1B cap because it can guarantee me a slot and less RFE. My own lawyer said it is not necessary and I can still retain the H-1B exempt status. Which is more advantageous?

Answer #5
I really do not have enough information to provide you with a sufficient answer. When seeking Immigration benefits with the USCIS, nothing is guaranteed. Therefore, speaking of a less chance of obtaining an RFE is not guaranteed. The USCIS may issue an RFE regardless of whether the petition is CAP exempt or to be considered under the CAP. If the USCIS determines that they cannot make a decision based upon the initial evidence presented in the petition, they will request an RFE regardless. If I were you I would speak with your lawyer about this possible conversion, as it seems as though he knows your case and would know what is best given your current situation.


Question #6 – Student – F1 Visa Status
I have been working for a company on my OPT and now they wish to file for my H-1B. I also just recently got married to a U.S. Citizen. My OPT expires next month and I want to be able to continue to work. Which should I proceed forward with? The H-1B or the family based case?

Answer #6
If you do not file a petition prior to the expiration of your OPT, you will begin to accrue unlawful status and will need to leave the country. Therefore, if you have a valid job offer, you should file an H-1B petition under the FY2012 CAP, which will allow you to remain working after the expiration of your OPT up until the starting date of your H-1B, October 1, 2011.

Given the current time frames for processing of family based immigrant petitions, I do not believe that you would have sufficient time to file and then obtain an EAD to continue working. You may initiate the family based petition at any time.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – L1A Intra-Company Transferee Visa
I am on valid L1A until end of next month. What do I need to show to get grant of approval for extension of L1A status?

Answer #7
You will need to fully document the following: (1) The U.S. company and the foreign company continue to be qualifying organizations; (2) The foreign company employed the applicant in an executive/managerial capacity for at least one year prior to the transfer to the U.S. Company; and (3) the U.S. Company will continue to employ the applicant in the executive/managerial capacity.


Question #8 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I am in the process of transferring employers and I don’t know if I can get a hold of an ‘end client letter,’ as the project is being run exclusively through the vendor. Can we submit my petition without the end client letter?

Answer #8
You may submit the case without the end client letter; however, you most likely will receive a request for additional evidence (RFE) asking for an end client letter, which will further delay the approval. The most important thing the USCIS wants to see when filing an H-1B petition for third party placement is the contractual placement of the beneficiary and the establishment of a bona fide employer-employee relationship. They want to make sure that the duties the employee will be engaged in at the third party client site are ‘specialty occupation’ duties, and the end client letter attests to that exact information. This was not always the case; however, now a days, there are a lot of companies that take advantage of the H-1B program and place applicants at third party sites and do not retain any employment relationship with them, so much so that the USCIS released a memo back in January of 2010 indicating the acceptable documents to establish the legitimacy of the third party placement. Therefore, in order to obtain an approval, you have to document the above information – ‘contractual placement’ of the applicant and the ‘bona fide employer-employee relationship.’ In the past we have done so without the end client letter, by submitting a vendor verification letter, timesheets and progress sheets from the end client and so forth; however, the strongest most sound evidence is the ‘end client letter.’


Question #9 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
I am a permanent resident, short of the five years needed for Citizenship. I would like to sponsor my parents for a Green Card; can you please let me know the process?

Answer #9
As a permanent resident, you are currently not able to sponsor your Parent’s Green Cards at this time. Once you apply and are granted Citizenship, then you may apply through the USCIS on behalf of your parents.


Question #10 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Just need some advice. I have a concept for a truly authentic Indian restaurant and wish to sponsor a Chef under the H-1B visa program. Is this possible? What is required? I would be looking to sponsor him under the quota for next year, 2013, as I need this year in order to fully develop, carry out and incorporate my restaurant.

Answer #10
It is possible, if you have the requisite documentation and the concept of the restaurant is dependent upon the qualifications and expertise of the skilled Chef. We have filed numerous Executive Chef petitions through our firm and did not have trouble if the Chef is one who is highly noted for his work, has documentation to prove this, and the concept of the restaurant is focused on the Chef’s work.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, May 13, 2011! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyer blog.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, April 29th, 2011

April 25, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, April 29th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

April 20, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on April 18, 2011 with processing dates as of February 28, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Immigration in 2011 - Part 7 of 10, Attacks on the 14th Amendment

April 13, 2011

Seventh part of our ten part series examining the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s (AILA) publication of “What to Watch Out for in Immigration in 2011.”

Topic #7: Attacks on the 14th Amendment

The proposal by Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) to revoke portions of the14th amendment which gave automatic citizenship to children born on U.S. soil sparked controversy back in July 2010. Since Senator Graham’s proposal many other senators have continued to debate and propose new legislation over the issue of birthright citizenship. Although many senators are pushing to pass laws that would prohibit children born in the U.S. from being granted U.S. citizenship, AILA believes this type of legislation would do little to fix our broken immigration system. Additionally, passing the law would only increase the number of individuals in the U.S. who are residing here illegally.

28 different bills have been proposed by Republican senators since 1995 to prohibit citizenship rights under the 14th amendment. AILA believes restricting the civil rights guaranteed under the 14th amendment would “offend the country’s most sacred values” and put into place discrimination that the country was founded on to fix. Passing the law and actually repealing the citizenship clause would mark the first time in history that the Constitution was amended to restrict civil rights and liberties. Eliminating the basis of citizenship based on place of birth would create problems for the general American public as well because they would no longer be able to provide their birth certificate as proof of citizenship.

Revoking portions of the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution will not fix our broken system; it will only create more problems and increase the amount of undocumented individuals in the U.S. If you have any ideas on how best to fix our broken immigration system, we welcome your comments and suggestions…

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, April 15th, 2011

April 11, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our
h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, April 15th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

UPDATE: What Happens If The Government Shuts Down?

April 8, 2011

As Congress continues its budgetary deadlock, the possibility of a government shutdown looms larger by the minute. If Congress is unable to reach accord on Friday, the government will close at midnight, Saturday April 9.

In general, if the government shuts down for budgetary reasons, all but "essential" government are furloughed and not allowed to work. So what does this mean for immigration agencies?

USCIS Update: USCIS has confirmed to AILA Liaison that it will be operating, except for E-Verify, if the government does shut down.

DOS Update: DOS confirmed to AILA Liaison that if there is a shutdown, the only visa processing will be for "life or death" emergencies. In prior budget-related shutdowns, DOS has continued to provide diplomatic visas and has been wont to say "a really, really important business meeting is not life or death."

CBP: Inspection and law enforcement are considered "essential personnel," though staffing may be more limited than usual. The borders will be open, and CBP is unsure of how the shutdown will affect the processing of applications filed at the border.

EOIR: EOIR has been advised to "put its shutdown plans in place." As with other agencies, personnel who are not considered "essential" will be furloughed. EOIR has indicated that the detained docket would likely be considered an essential function and would therefore be able to continue in operation.

DOL Update: OFLC confirmed that it would cease processing all applications in the event of a government shutdown. DOL is making plans for a possible shutdown. If there is a shutdown, DOL personnel will not be available to respond to e-mail or other inquiries.

Other agencies will be added, and the above updated, as AILA obtains more information.

Information Source: "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11040730 (posted Apr. 8, 2011)"

What Happens If The Government Shuts Down?

April 8, 2011

The following information has been provided by AILA, the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

As Congress continues its budgetary deadlock, the possibility of a government shutdown looms larger by the minute. If Congress is unable to reach accord on Friday, the government will close at midnight, Saturday April 9.

In general, if the government shuts down for budgetary reasons, all but "essential" government are furloughed and not allowed to work. So what does this mean for immigration agencies?

USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services): A couple of shutdown threats back, a USCIS official stated at a stakeholder engagement that USCIS (other than the human touches on E-Verify) would not need to shut down, since all of the agency, other than E-Verify, is funded by fees. However, it is not clear that this is the case, and at least one local office has indicated that it is working on its shutdown plan. AILA will update this information as they get more information.

DOS (Department of State): If there is a shutdown, the result for DOS will likely be the same as it was in the 1996 government closing. Then, the only visa issuance being done was for some diplomats and for "life or death" situations. As DOS is wont to say "a really, really important business meeting is not life or death."

CBP (Customs and Border Patrol): Inspection and law enforcement are considered "essential personnel," though staffing may be more limited than usual. The borders will be open, and CBP is unsure of how the shutdown will affect the processing of applications filed at the border.

EOIR (Executive Office for Immigration Review): EOIR has been advised to "put its shutdown plans in place." As with other agencies, personnel who are not considered "essential" will be furloughed. EOIR has indicated that the detained docket would likely be considered an essential function and would therefore be able to continue in operation.

DOL (Department of Labor): DOL is making plans for a possible shutdown. If there is a shutdown, DOL personnel will not be available to respond to e-mail or other inquiries. AILA does not know at this point whether iCERT/PERM would continue to function. However, because the systems require funding to run, practitioners should assume that they would not be available.

Other agencies will be added, and the above updated, as AILA obtains more information.

Source of Information - AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11040730 (posted Apr. 7, 2011)

Immigration in 2011 - Part 5 of 10, Punitive Enforcement Approaches

March 30, 2011

Fifth part of our ten part series examining the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s (AILA) publication of “What to Watch Out for in Immigration in 2011.”

Topic #5: Punitive Enforcement Approaches

In the 112th Congress violations of immigration laws are expected to have stricter penalties and further legislation is likely to be proposed in connection to the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) that was passed in 1996.

These proposed radical enforcements include mass deportation of any individual in the US illegally, deportation for lawful permanent residents who commit even minor crimes, deportation for visitors who stay past the visa expiration date as well as punishment for individuals who use fake passports and visas. Additionally, many lawmakers also wish to expedite hearings and take away individuals legal right to a fair trial. Although consequences are needed for those individuals who break the law, the legislation proposed is not proportionate to the crimes and would be difficult to implement.

Both the Bush and Obama administration worked to enforce immigration law effectively during fiscal year 2010 through the Emergency Border Security Supplemental Appropriations Act as well as increased border security agents and surveillance technology.

Those who favor a more stricter immigration policy feel more officers on the border is one of the only ways to limit the number of illegal immigrants in the US. However opponents, both democrats and republicans alike, feel the mass deportation approach is too unrealistic. Additionally, according to the Center for American Progress deporting all the undocumented workers in the US over five years would cost approximately $41.2 billion each year. The deportation of all illegal immigrants who currently live in the U.S. would also tremendously harm the U.S. economy.

In 2005, the House passed legislation that would have made it a criminal offense for someone to be in the U.S. while on an invalid visa or without green card; currently this is only a violation of civil immigration laws. Many have raised their concerns over this legislation because the conditions of a visa can easily be violated without it being criminal, for example, a college student not taking enough credits under their visa. Passing the legislation would also push the illegal immigrants further away from society and authorities out of fear for deportation. Not to mention the fact that the bill would create an increase in immigration cases in the court system, currently overwhelmed with present cases.

We desperately need an answer; however, deporting our entire illegal immigrant community is not the best nor most economical approach. If you have any ideas on how best to fix our broken immigration system, we welcome your comments and suggestions…

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

March 28, 2011

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, April 1st, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, April 1st, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!


THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Immigration in 2011 - Part 4 of 10, State and Local Authority to Enforce Immigration Law

March 23, 2011

Fourth part of our ten part series examining the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s (AILA) publication of “What to Watch Out for in Immigration in 2011.”

Topic #4: State and Local Authority to Enforce Immigration Law

The role state and local officials should play when enforcing immigration laws has been a heavily debated issue especially since the passing of Arizona’s SB 1070 law.

Allowing each state to determine its own border and immigration laws would create chaos and conflict among bordering states with differing opinions and it would make the laws very hard to enforce. This is why AILA believes immigration law should remain a federal issue, however countless laws are passed each year by states on immigration and border control which affect housing, public benefits, employment, education and even public health.

Many of the laws states have tried to pass related to immigration policy have been repealed by the federal government such as parts of Arizona’s SB 1070. Because of the insistence by many states to pass their own immigration laws, lawmakers have pushed to pass legislation that would make it clear who has authority on immigration matters. One such piece of legislation is the CLEAR Act, which if passed would allow state and local authorities to enforce immigration laws.

Opponents of the CLEAR Act fear that if local agencies begin enforcing immigration matters, those in immigrant communities will be less likely to talk to authorities, report crimes and be willing to cooperate with the police. It will additionally lead to an increased fear of deportation. State and local police officials also oppose laws like the CLEAR Act as well because it would prohibit them from protecting the public if they had to become “deportation agents.” State and local officials currently don’t have the knowledge or resources to enforce the immigration laws and asking them to do so would create an overwhelming amount of pressure and responsibility. Secure Communities, the Criminal Alien Program and the 287(g) program are federal programs already in place that rely on local law enforcement to arrest and provide information about potential illegal immigrants. Although many are concerned that these programs diminish trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement, AILA believes it’s likely we will see a push to expand and create new programs in 2011.

If you would like to express your views on this issue, please complete the contact us form. We want to hear what YOU think, how YOU feel about this issue!

Updated Service Center Processing Times

March 17, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on March 14, 2011 with processing dates as of January 31, 2011.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

**Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Immigration in 2011 - Part 3 of 10, Restrictions on State Identification Cards (REAL ID)

March 16, 2011

Third part of our ten part series examining the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s (AILA) publication of “What to Watch Out for on Immigration in 2011.”

Topic #3: Restrictions on State Identification Cards (REAL ID)

The REAL ID Act was brought up after national security concerns grew in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The act scrutinized state driver licenses as well as identification cards, creating a federal standard for driver licenses issued.

Rising conflict over the enactment of the REAL ID Act is likely to continue to grow during the 112th Congress. Originally, the act was supposed to go in effect in 2008 but due to obstacles it has been postponed to May 10, 2011. If this act were passed, individuals who could not provide sufficient basic documentation proving their legal status would not be issued a driver’s license. Many criticize the idea of creating a new driver’s license system, pointing out that with the new system states will begin obtaining, storing and sharing more personal information about each applicant. The influx of sensitive information poses the increased possibility for identity theft and fraud. Restrictions on driver’s licenses from the large population of undocumented workers also creates fear of being reported and pushes the illegal immigrants to be less cooperative with law enforcement.

Senators Akaka (D-HI) and Voinovich (R-OH) proposed an alternative to the REAL ID Act back in 2009, called the Providing for Additional Security in States’ Identification Act (PASS ID Act). A key difference between the REAL ID Act and the PASS ID Act is that states are prohibited from accessing other states transportation databases under the PASS ID Act. This change addressed some of the security concerns critics had of the REAL ID Act. However, PASS ID is not a perfect piece of legislation and is considered stricter in the fact that it requires work authorization in order for individuals applying for asylum and temporary protected status (TPS) to receive a license. Additionally, under the PASS ID Act licenses could be denied without review to any population of people by the DHS Secretary which is a significant cause for concern.

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

March 14, 2011

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 18th, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 18th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 3, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 16 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 28 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 31 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

February 28, 2011

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, March 4th, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, March 4th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Naturalization Questions - Check Out the NAT Fact Sheet

February 22, 2011

Over the course of the 2010 fiscal year, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) naturalized over 676,000 individuals. 6.6 million individuals have been naturalized in the United States in the last decade.

To become naturalized, an individual must file an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) and meet the following requirements as set forth by the Immigration Nationality Act (INA):

• Be at least 18
• Be a lawful permanent resident
• Have lived in the US for at least five years
• Have been physically present in the US for 30 months
• Have good moral character
• Speak, read, and write in English
• Be knowledgeable of US government and history
• Take the Oath of Allegiance

There are however exceptions and special exemptions to the requirements of naturalization. The provisions mainly apply to spouses of US citizens, members of the military and children under the age of 18.

After fulfilling the naturalization requirements and filing a Form N-400, an individual will have an interview scheduled with a USCIS officer. If found qualified by the USCIS officer during the interview, the individual is then scheduled to take the Oath of Allegiance which completes the naturalization process.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, February 18, 2011

February 18, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Nonimmigrant Visa
Can I travel on my current nonimmigrant visa or do I need to get advance parole?

Answer #1
If you have a valid nonimmigrant visa stamp in your passport and copies of your approval notice and a copy of the petition, you should be able to travel on your nonimmigrant visa. Advance Parole is a separate creature that you may apply for once you are able to file an I-485 petition for either a family based or employment based green card. The Advance Parole document allows you to travel outside the country while your I-485 application is pending.

The nonimmigrant visa and advance parole are two separate and distinct items, you may have both if you are applying for adjustment, but if you only have a valid nonimmigrant visa stamp in your passport, you should be able to travel.


Question #2 –Green Card
How long can you live outside the United States and still keep your green card valid?

Answer #2
One should be able to use one's green card to return from trips abroad of up to one year. However, anytime a green card holder leaves the U.S., he or she is subject to being accused by the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) of having abandoned the intention of living in the U.S., and is subject to having the green card taken away--on the spot. Staying longer than one year may also affect the naturalization process if and when you attempt to apply.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa
I am interested in coming to the United States and being sponsored by a religious organization. I know that the H-1B cap is closed, so you can tell me about the R-1 visa and what requirements it has?

Answer #3
According to the Department of State, Religious workers include persons authorized, by a recognized employing entity, to conduct religious worship and perform other duties usually performed by authorized members of the clergy of that religion, and workers engaging in a religious vocation or occupation. To qualify: The applicant must be a member of a religious denomination having a bona fide nonprofit religious organization in the U.S.; the religious denomination and its affiliate, if applicable, are either exempt from taxation or qualifies for tax-exempt status; and the applicant has been a member of the denomination for two years immediately preceding applying for religious worker status. The applicant is planning to work as a minister of that denomination, or in a religious occupation or vocation for a bona fide, non-profit religious organization (or a tax-exempt affiliate of such an organization).There is no requirement that individuals applying for "R" visas have a residence abroad that they have no intention of abandoning. However, they must intend to depart the U.S. at the end of their lawful status, absent specific indications or evidence to the contrary.


Question #4 – Nonimmigrant Visa
What is the TN Visa and how can I qualify for it?

Answer #4
The TN Visa is a product of NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), certain citizens of Canada and Mexico are eligible to enter the U.S. under the nonimmigrant TN status. The TN Visa enables Canadian and Mexican citizens to temporarily work in the U.S. in a NAFTA-approved professional occupation.


Question #5 – General
How long can you lawfully stay in the United States before returning home after a visa expires?

Answer #5
Generally, it depends on the visa issued. We recommend a period of two weeks after the expiration of your visa to get your affairs in order for your departure. However, if you remain in the U.S. longer than 180 days after the expiration of your visa, you most likely will be subject to the 3 year or 10 year bar from returning to the U.S., unless certain circumstances prevented your departure.


Question #6 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I am interested in filing for an H-1B visa but I know the cap just closed so when can I file my case for the next year’s cap?

Answer #6
The H-1B FY2012 CAP will open on April 1, 2011 with employment beginning October 1, 2011. For more information contact MVP Law Group, P.A.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
If I am on an H-1B visa, do my wife and children automatically receive H-4 status or do they have to apply for it?

Answer #7
No, they would have to apply for the H4 visa status. If the beneficiary’s spouse/children are in the United States on another status other than H status, e.g. student status, an application to change their status to an H status should be filed. If the beneficiary or the beneficiary’s spouse/children are outside the United States and the beneficiary wishes to apply for a derivative visa (referred to as an H4 visa) abroad, and the H4 visa application can be made and is available on walk-in basis at the U.S. Consulate abroad along with or after the grant of the H1B approval, no other processing is required for an H4 visa abroad. Contact the consulate abroad or an Information Officer at the United States Department of State Visa Office at 202.663.1225 for the procedures or documents that may be required.


Question #8 – General
If my case was issued an RFE, what does that mean? Does it automatically mean that my case will be denied? What chance do I have of getting my visa granted if an RFE was issued?

Answer #8
A Request for Evidence (RFE) is issued when additional evidence is required, as the adjudicator believes that it cannot make a decision based on the initial evidence/documentation provided. A USCIS adjudicating officer could issue an RFE pertaining to the alien applicant's eligibility, the Petitioner’s financials, the legitimacy of the Petitioner’s company, etc. Many cases do receive RFE’s, and after submission of additional legal arguments, explanations, and evidence, the cases are often approved. Receiving an RFE on a submitted case does not automatically mean that the case will be denied.


Question #9 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
As a US citizen, who can I file a Form I-130, Petition for Alien relative on behalf of? Do the people I can petition on behalf of change if I am only a legal permanent resident?

Answer #9
As a U.S. Citizen (USC), you may petition on behalf of the following individuals: Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens may immigrate to the United States in unlimited numbers - Spouses of U.S. citizens (including widows and widowers of U.S. citizens who were married to U.S. citizens for at least two years and are applying for a green card within two years of the U.S. citizens’ death); Unmarried children of U.S. citizens that are under the age of 21; Parents of U.S. citizens. The U.S. citizen petitioner must be 21 years of age.

These individuals will most likely have to wait in line, possibly for many years, prior to being able to obtain a green card - Unmarried children, any age, of U.S. citizens; Married children of U.S. citizens; Sisters and brothers of U.S. citizens. The U.S. citizen must be at least 21 years of age.

As a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR), you may petition on behalf of the following individuals: Spouses and unmarried children (under the age of 21) of green card holders; and Unmarried sons and daughters of green card holders, who are at least 21 years old.


Question #10 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card - EAD Renewal
I filed for my EAD renewal back in November of 2010 and it is still pending. My current EAD expires next week. What are my options moving forward - can I expedite the EAD since my card is expiring? What can I do I can’t risk losing my current job?

Answer #10
When an EAD renewal has been pending for 75+ days, you may initiate an ‘outside the processing times’ Service Request with the USCIS. If you do not receive your EAD approval by the time your current EAD expires, you MUST WAIT and NOT WORK until your EAD is approved. You MAY NOT continue to work. You MUST wait for your EAD card to arrive in the mail before you can begin to work again.

You may file an EAD renewal request up to 120 days in advance of the expiration of your current EAD and should be aware of the Service Center processing times well in advance of filing so that you can obtain an approval of the EAD to continue working.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, March 4th, 2011! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyer blog.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

February 17, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on February 14, 2011 with processing dates as of December 31, 2010.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

February 15, 2011

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, February 18th, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, February 18th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Congratulations on Becoming a U.S. Citizen

February 2, 2011

After taking the oath and becoming a Unites States Citizen (USC), it is important to be aware of the newfound rights and responsibilities that come along with Citizenship.

All American citizens enjoy the following rights: freedom of expression and worship, right to vote in elections, right to a just and speedy trial, ability to apply for federal employment, and of course the freedom of “life liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” The rights guaranteed to individuals who are citizens by choice and by birth also come with responsibilities that they are expected to uphold. Responsibilities include: participating in a democracy, respecting the beliefs and opinions of others, reporting for jury duty, paying taxes, supporting the local community, and being ready to defend the country if the need arises.

Now that you are a citizen, it is also important to make sure you update your Social Security Record because it establishes your eligibility to receive benefits and obtain a job. You can call 1-800-772-1213 or visit www.socialsecurity.gov to locate the nearest office but remember to make sure you bring your Certificate of Naturalization or Passport with you.

If you do not have a U.S. passport but would like one, you are eligible to apply for one now that you are a U.S. citizen. For information on how to apply visit: www.Travel.State.Gov.

Additionally, if you have a child who is younger than 18 years old on the day you were naturalized, they automatically acquire your citizenship status and you may apply for a U.S. passport for them as well.

U.S. citizens can also petition for relatives to become lawful permanent residents by becoming their sponsor. For more information visit: www.uscis.gov/howdoi or contact MVP Law Group.

AILA Profile: Representative Elton Gallegly (R-CA)

January 24, 2011

With the commencement of the 112th Congress on January 5, 2011, Representative Elton Gallegly (R-CA) was appointed to lead the Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement.

Rep. Gallegly is best know for his restrictive immigration policies and push in creating the E-Verify program. He believes the solution to illegal immigration is straightforward: enforce current laws, eliminate incentives for individuals to illegally immigrate, and take away benefits we provide that make it easier for illegal immigrants to stay in the US. Since becoming a representative, Gallegly has chaired the Congressional Task Force on Immigration Reform which provided the fundamentals for IIRIRA in 1996 and he supported an amendment to IIRIRA that would have prohibited illegal immigrants from attending public school. Additionally, in 2006 he was named by Human Events Magazine as of the Top Ten Illegal Immigration Hawks in Congress and inducted in the US Border Control Hall of Fame.

Already since the start of the 112th Congress, Gallegly has proposed legislation to require the creation of electronic Social Security cards as well as an employment eligibility database. It’s likely we could see legislation from him being proposed on topics such as ending birthright citizenship, requiring the use of E-Verify, making English the official US language, and requiring proof of citizenship to receive benefits in the near future.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, January 21st, 2011

January 21, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Is the H-1B FY2011 CAP still open?

Answer #1
YES! As of January 14th, 2011 60,700 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visa petitions had been filed with the USCIS toward the 65,000 annual CAP. USCIS will continue to accept cap-subject petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.


Question #2 – Marriage Based Immigration –Green Card
I am marrying a United States citizen in a few weeks, do you know when I can expect to have my interview and eventually get my green card?

Answer #2
Once you have married and have submitted your paperwork to the USCIS, it is taking approximately 3-4 months nationwide to obtain an interview appointment. This is an estimate as all cases are not the same and the circumstances in one case may be different than in another. If there are any prior marriages, criminal charges, or other circumstances that could affect the case, processing may take even longer.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I have been considering teaching for a while as a way to give back and was wondering being on H1-B, would I be able to hold a part-time/adjunct teaching position at a university, if given the opportunity?

Answer #3
You would be able to hold a part-time/adjunct teaching position at a university; however, the University must be willing to sponsor your H-1B visa. The University would have to go thru the normal process of preparing and filing the necessary forms and paying the necessary USCIS filing fees, if applicable, as well as paying all legal fees involved.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visa – L1 Intra-company Transferee
What is the grace period on an L1A extension? I reside in California, my current L1A visa expires on 3/25/2011 and I’ve filed for an extension on 12/17/2010. I got a receipt for it.

Answer #4
Under regulation 8 C.F.R. §274a.12(b)(20), a person lawfully employed under A-3, E-1,E-2,E-3,G-5,H-1B, H-2A/B, H-3, I, J-1, L-1, O-1/O-2, P-1/P-2/P-3, R or TN status who timely files an application for extension consistent with 8 C.F.R. §214.1, is automatically given 240 days from date of expiration. This extension does not apply to persons seeking a change of status. During 240 days, there is no INA 245(c) bar to adjustment of status.


Question #5 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I had gone for visa stamping and was issued 221(g) blue form. This is the reason given: "Your petition is not currently reflected in the PIMS database. Processing of your case will be suspended until we can verify your petition details." According to the visa officer, I should get my passport in 10 days. I am worried, is this normal?

Answer #5
It is a normal process and there is no reason to be alarmed, this is a standard procedure, so unfortunately, you must wait until your status/case can be confirmed and then you will receive your visa stamp. As stated below by the DOS, extensions of stay and change of status petitions take longer to verify through the database.

The U.S. Department of State (DOS) has instructed consular posts that approvals of H, L, O, P and Q visa petitions must be verified through the Petition Information Management Service (PIMS) before a nonimmigrant visa can be issued. PIMS is an electronic report generated by DOS’s Kentucky Consular Center that collects nonimmigrant visa petition approval information from USCIS. PIMS contains data on initial petition approvals and on L blanket petitions that were approved in 2004 or later. PIMS does not contain information on approvals of extension of stay or changes of status petitions. Consular officers adjudicating visa applications must consult PIMS to verify the approval of the underlying nonimmigrant visa petition. If the petition approval cannot be verified through PIMS, the officer must contact the Kentucky Consular Center, which in turn attempts to verify the approval through USCIS’s Computer Linked Applications Information Management System (CLAIMS). DOS officials state that PIMS verification typically takes no more than 24 hours and that verification through CLAIMS typically takes two business days. Most cases involving initial nonimmigrant visa petitions are verified within these timeframes. However, they have received many reports of longer processing times for extension of stay and change of status cases. These cases must be verified with the assistance of the Kentucky Consular Center and can take longer to be processed. DOS has indicated that there are no current plans to include extension and change of status approval information in PIMS, which may result in significant delays for many applicants. Foreign nationals who will be applying for nonimmigrant visas should expect longer processing times due to the new PIMS and CLAIMS verification requirement. How long the electronic process will take may vary from case to case. However, same-day and next-day visa issuance should not be expected.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Regarding a change of job, is there a recommended wait time after the green card that I can change my employer. On the EAD there was a 6mth after which I could do this, but was wondering after the GC if there is any such thing. Appreciate your answer.

Answer #6
Although the regulations are silent on this issue, we recommend that you wait at least six (6) months before changing your employer to avoid issues if you intend on applying for citizenship when you become eligible.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
The Processing Time Table indicates it takes about 2 months, as on 31/10/2010 update. So I wasn't sure what that 2 months meant, and above all it was last updated on 31/10/2010. Can you tell me why it is taking so long?

Answer #7
Although the USCIS processing times may state 2 months, you have to factor in that when it is posted, that data is already 45 days old. Also, due to the FY2011 H-1B CAP still being available, the USCIS is busy with attempting to adjudicate change of status petitions, extensions and transfers all within the same processing times. Although this explanation is not an excuse, I just want you to be aware of the background with the processing times for the H-1B nonimmigrant visa.


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My I-140 Immigrant petition has been approved. My next step is to apply to adjust status to permanent resident. What kind of documents do I need to have for AOS application?

Answer #8
In order to apply for AOS, your priority date needs to be current, once your priority date is current, you will able to file the Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident along with the Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document. There are numerous background documents that will need to be submitted along with your petition, including: a sealed medical examination from a civil surgeon in your area, birth certificates, copies of federal tax returns, bank statements, and an employment verification letter, among other documents.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I've been working on this product that i want to launch, if all goes well, sometime this year. This will be an E-Commerce business. With regards to me being on H1-B, would I be able to start up my own small company?

Answer #9
As a temporary H-1B nonimmigrant worker, you are NOT ALLOWED to start up your own small company. There are other types of visas available if you are seriously interested in starting your own company, but you are not allowed to start up your own small company on your H-1B visa status. If you are interested in other possible options, please contact our office to speak with one of our experienced Immigration Attorneys.


Question #10 – Marriage Based Immigration –Green Card
What is a “Stokes” interview?

Answer #10
A “Stokes” interview is the last opportunity the USCIS provides for you and your spouse to prove the bona fides of your marriage. If the USCIS does not think that your marriage is legitimate, they will schedule a “Stokes” interview. The husband and wife are separately questioned by a USCIS Officer regarding their relationship history, daily interactions, relationship in general, presence on social networking websites, etc. The interview/questioning is recorded and an attorney is permitted to attend.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, February 4th, 2011! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

Updated Service Center Processing Times

January 19, 2011

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on January 14, 2011 with processing dates as of November 30, 2010.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

Please be aware that the data given above is approximately 45 days old at the time of posting.

Given this information, If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Improvements to Consular Report of Birth Abroad Certificates

January 17, 2011

On December 22, 2010, the Department of State announced the implementation of a newly redesigned Consular Report of Birth Abroad Certificate. (CRBA). In the past, CRBAs have been printed at US Embassies and Consulates but beginning January 3, 2011, all CRBAs will be printed at the passport facilities in Portsmouth, New Hampshire and New Orleans, Louisiana.

This new streamlined and centralized process will allow the production of CRBAs to be more controlled as well as decrease the possibility of fraud. In addition to the production location change, CRBAs issued after January 3, 2011 will feature the title of “parent” instead of “mother” or “father.” This change was instituted in order to “provide a gender neutral description of a child’s parents and in recognition of different types of families.”

NAT Applicants - Changes to Naturalization Civics Test

January 11, 2011

For those individuals taking naturalization tests AFTER January 5, 2011 please note that there are some changes to the civics test answers due to the recent federal elections. Questions 20, 23, and 47 will have different responses.

For question 20 which asks: “Who is one of your State’s US Senators now?” please choose a senator for your state that will serve in the 112th Congress. A list of current members of the US Senate can be found at www.senate.gov.

For question 23 which states: “Name your US Representative” also make sure to write the name of your representative that will be serving in the 112th Congress. A list of the members of the US House of Representatives can found at www.house.gov.

Question 47 asks, “What is the name of the Speaker of the House of Representatives now?” For this question, please answer John Boehner as he is the Speaker for the 112th Congress which began January 5, 2011.

At MVP Law Group, we offer high quality legal services at cost efficient rates with an individualized hands-on approach for each and every client. Contact our office for your Naturalization needs. From the onset, you will receive individualized attention from the initial client meeting up until your Naturalization interview. We will discuss with you the advantages of U.S. Citizenship, the process and time frame for applying; provide you with study materials and when you’re ready, devote an hour of personal attention to help you prepare for your Naturalization interview.

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

January 3, 2011

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, January 7th, 2011

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, January 7th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Boston Measure to Allow Green Card Holders to Vote

December 16, 2010

The town of Brookline, Massachusetts has approved a measure that will someday allow immigrants with a green card to vote once voted on by the Legislature. Similar measures in San Francisco and Portland were turned down but because Brookline is such a highly diverse area where 53 languages are spoken and immigrants with green cards pay taxes and have a say in town affairs, many believed they should also be allowed to vote.

One Brookline resident said, “They live here, they should vote here. They’re going to be citizens, ultimately, if they have a green card.”

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

December 13, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, December 17th, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, December 17th, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

USCIS Naturalizes Largest Number of Service Members Since 1955

December 6, 2010

During the 2010 fiscal year 11,146 members of the armed forces were granted citizenship by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the largest number amount in any year since 1955. The number represents a 6 percent increase in naturalizations from the 2009 fiscal year.

Outreach programs created by USCIS have been launched in order to reach more military members. They are encouraged to attend seminars that review that naturalization process and other immigration services. Attendance at the seminars often results in increased applications for naturalizations within the community. The Naturalization at Basic Training Initiative has also allowed for all processes like the interview, administration of the Oath of Allegiance and collection of biometrics to be done on the military bases. The initiative allows recruits to gain citizenship once they complete basic training. Specific information about citizenship and immigration benefits for the armed forces and their families can be found at http://www.uscis.gov/military.

REMINDER - Submit Your Questions

November 29, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, December 3rd, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, December 3rd, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Naturalization Rates among IRCA Immigrants: A 2009 Update

November 26, 2010

On October 27, the DHS Office of Immigration Statistics released a compiled Fact Sheet which compares the naturalization rates of IRCA(Immigration Reform and Control Act) legalized immigrants up until 2009 with the rates of other immigrants who arrived during the same period or obtained in a LPR(legal permanent resident) status.

The IRCA was passed back in 1986 and created pathways to citizenship for many different groups of immigrants. The two main groups that benefited were immigrants who had always resided in the US illegally before January 1, 1982 and special agricultural workers (SAWs) who were required to have worked in US agriculture during specific years ending on May 1 for at least 90 days (1984, 1985, and 1986). In order to gain LPR status, IRCA immigrants were required to meet certain requirements and standards.

All of the data for the Fact Sheet was gathered through the Department of Homeland Security’s records. No individual below the age 18 was included and children who may have received legal status because of their parents were also excluded. All rates were compared amongst immigrants during the same time period. Some of the findings and results of the Fact Sheet were that 2.7 million immigrants achieved LPR status under IRCA, naturalization rates were lowest among individuals who gained status through IRCA provisions and as time went on the percentage of immigrants who were naturalized gradually increased. Other conclusions from the Fact Sheet are that fact that Mexican-born SAWs had a lower rate of naturalization than other groups of immigrants and non-Mexican born immigrants were not subject to the same extra requirements others were.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

November 15, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, November 19th, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, November 19th, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Immigration Reform: Binational Same Sex Couples Fear They'll Be Left Out

November 10, 2010

Even though the District of Columbia legalized same sex marriage earlier this year, the federal government doesn’t recognize the marriages and therefore same sex couples do not receive the same benefits as heterosexual couples. Erwin de Leon and Rev. John Beddingfield are just one of the many couples in the District who experience limitations. Leon is an immigrant from the Philippines on a student visa that expires next year and because he and Beddingfield do not receive the same immigration benefits as heterosexual couples, he can not apply to become a U.S. citizen. According to a census taken by the UCLA’s Williams Institute, there are an “estimated 25,000 same sex couples in the US that [have] one partner [that] is foreign born.” The introduction of Senators Leahy (D-VT) and Menendez (D-RI) Comprehensive Reform Act of 2010 may be the immigration reform needed because it encompasses the Uniting American Families Act (UAFA) which would grant citizenship to same-sex couples.

USCIS Redesigns Naturalization Certificate to Enhance Security

November 4, 2010

The launch of the redesigned Certificate of Naturalization (Form N-550) was announced October 25 by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The new certificate was redesigned in order to increase security and reduce the amount of fraud. Due to the revamping of the naturalization certificates, USCIS estimates over 600,000 individuals will receive the enhanced certificate over the next year. Features of the redesigned certificates include a digitized photo and an embedded signature on the document, as well as a color-shifting background that is difficult to copy. In addition, USCIS has implemented a new, more secure printing process that makes the document more resistant to fraud. The Director of USCIS, Alejandro Mayorkas, also announced that by the end of the year USCIS would fully transition to an automated production process for the new certificates. The automated process would allow for increased consistency in the creation of naturalization certificates and it would cut down on preparation time. Any previously issued Certificates of Naturalization will remain legitimate even with the implementation of the redesigned certificates.

USCIS Issued a Fact Sheet and a Q&A regarding the redesign of the Naturalization Certificate, please click here to access.

USCIS Issues Two Precedent Appeals Decisions

November 3, 2010

An announcement on October 20 from US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) revealed that two decisions by the USCIS Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) are now binding precedent, also known as law. The decisions made by the AAO are a joint collaboration between the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the US Department of Justice (DOJ). DHS and the Attorney General must agree that a particular immigration appeals case is grounds for establishing a universal rule that would apply to all future cases before it becomes an AAO precedent decision. The two binding precedents created state an applicant’s petition must first be considered “valid” before the validity can be considered if the applicant moves to a new job and spells out the definition of an “American firm or corporation.”

In first case, Matter of AL WAZZAN, the applicant asked for adjustment of status to permanent residence even though the applicant never provided documentation supporting his eligibility for a permanent residence visa. After two of the applicant’s original Form I-140 visa petitions were denied, the applicant claimed he had an offer for other employment and wished to readjust his status. The applicant argued that he should be allowed status adjustment due to the fact his application has been pending for more than 180 days from the time it was ruled upon. The underlying problem found in the applicant’s case that the AAO decided to create a binding precedent for is Section 245(a) of the Act which “requires the adjustment applicant to have an ‘approved’ petition.”After reviewing the case, AAO found that the applicant’s assertions were not convincing enough to allow for his adjustment of status. Even though AC21 states that a petition shall remain valid even if unadjudicated for 180 days if the applicant changes to a new job or employer in the same or similar field, the applicant in this case did not have a “valid” petition to begin with for the legislation to be effective.

In the second case, Matter of CHAWATHE, the Acting District Director denied the applicant’s application to preserve residence for naturalization purposes. The overlying question in this case was whether a publicly traded corporation could be considered an “American firm or corporation.” After reviewing the case, AAO found that the previous statement may be deemed true under Section 316(b) of the Act, only if the applicant proves that the corporation is incorporated in the US and that the corporation’s stock is strictly within US markets. An applicant who has filed a Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes does not need to be physically in the country for the required two and half years of residency as long as the employer is an “American firm or corporation.” The director determined that in this case, the applicant failed to prove ChevronTexaco Corporation, his employer, was an “American firm or corporation.” The applicant argued that the employer was incorporated in the state of Delaware and that the company he worked for overseas is considered a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco. Although the company was incorporated in Delaware, AAO asserts that an applicant must also establish 50% of the company is owned by US citizens, which the applicant in this case did not. However, incorporation doesn’t necessarily determine if a company is an “American firm or corporation.” Under the evidence submitted, AAO found that ChevronTexaco is in fact an incorporation of the US and Saudi Arabia Texaco, and that the company the applicant went to go work for is a legitimate subsidiary of the company. In conclusion, AAO found ChevronTexaco Corporation in fact meets the definition of an “American corporation” and the applicants appeal was sustained.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

November 1, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, November 5th, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, November 5th, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

USCIS - Citizenship Resource Center

October 28, 2010

The USCIS launched the new Citizenship Resource Center on its website. The new feature was created to centralize resources for citizenship as well as help individuals better comprehend the naturalization process and gain understanding to better prepare them for a successful process. Some other highlights of the Citizenship Resource Center include podcasts, interactive learning tools, a search function for online citizenship classes, and resources for citizenship class instructors. Videos and citizenship information on the site are conviently provided in several languages.

The Citizenship Resource Center was formed along with the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Citizenship and Integration Grant Program which aims to create local citizenship education programs and increase the number of citizenship services offered.

Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2010

October 27, 2010

Senators Robert Menendez (D-NJ) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced The Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2010 into the Senate on September 29. This bill is the first comprehensive immigration bill that has been introduce in the Senate since 2007. It also combines key Democratic and Republic viewpoints and elements. Menendez and Leahy’s legislation proposes enhanced border security, mandatory employee verification, revisions to visa systems, a legalization plan for undocumented individuals in the US, and harsher penalties for illegal immigration.

To improve the security at our borders it specifically calls for improved training and more accountability for border/immigration officers, further cooperation with Canada and Mexico to improve border security, and reiterates that immigration power solely resides with the federal government. If passed, visa waiver privileges would be denied to certain countries, the waiting period would stop for refugees/asylees trying to obtain a green card, as well as increased penalties for immigration and visa fraud. Social Security cards would become “tamper-resistant” under the new bill to prevent fraud and the Social Security Administration (SSA) would be required to design a new more secure way of verifying social security numbers. Labor protections would also be expanded under H-2A, H-2B, H-1B, and L-1 visas in addition to preventing the expiration of green cards due to processing delays and establishment of certain exemptions from the quotas. A Lawful Prospective Immigrant (LPI) status for undocumented immigrants with no criminal background would be put into effect and it entails submission of data, security checks, and a $500 application fee for the LPI status of four years. Additionally, the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2010 would include the DREAM Act and institute programs to help immigrants learn English and US civics. Click here to read the full text of the bill or to find out more information.

USCIS Naturalization Fact Sheet

October 12, 2010

Each year the USCIS naturalizes approximately 680,000 citizens and so far over 6.8 million citizens have been naturalized into the United States. This fiscal year alone the US has already naturalized 495,232 people.

To apply for naturalization an individual must fill out Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization) and fulfill the requirements of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The INA sates an applicant must be at least 18, a green card holder, have resided in the US for at least five years, physically present in the US for at least 30 months, have good character, understand U.S. government & history, comprehend the English language and take the Oath of Allegiance.

Some exceptions exist for the naturalization requirements for individuals who are members of the military and whose spouses are U.S. citizens. Some of these exceptions include spouses, who may be eligible to receive naturalization in three years after being permanent residents rather than five, spouses stationed abroad may not have to meet residency requirements, children under 18 who are permanent residents can automatically gain citizenship if living with a U.S. citizen parent, and children living abroad with at least one U.S. citizen parent physically in the U.S. can be eligible for naturalization.

Individuals that have been naturalized live primarily in these 10 states: California, New York, Florida, Texas, New Jersey, Illinois, Virginia, Massachusetts, Washington and Maryland.

Former Guatemalan Special Forces Soldier Sentenced to 10 Years for Making False Statements on Naturalization Forms

October 12, 2010

Gilberto Jordan was found guilty by Florida’s U.S. District Court for illegally obtaining his U.S. citizenship and human rights violations for his participation in the massacre at Dos Erres, Guatemala. Jordan was a part of the Guatemalan special forces patrol who raided Dos Erres in 1982 looking for stolen rifles and guerrillas. The patrol searched all the houses for the weapons and systematically killed the men, women and children. When applying for his U.S. citizenship in 1996 Jordan denied he had ever been a part of the military or committed any crimes and later in 1999 continued to deny any dishonesty on his application during his application review. At the court sentencing, Jordan’s citizenship was revoked.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

October 11, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, October 15th, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, October 15th, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

USCIS Announces Final Rule Adjusting Fees for Immigration Benefits

October 8, 2010

On September 23, 2010 The U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced a final rule to adjust fees for immigration applications and petitions effective November 23. Due to USCIS’s large differential between costs and expected revenue, the final rule is necessary to bridge this gap. It will increase overall cost by an average of approximately 10 percent but doesn’t increase the cost for the naturalization application. With the USCIS being a primarily fee based organization it is required to conduct fee reviews every two years and the final rule wraps up the review that began in 2009.

Other new fees included in the final rule include: regional center designations under the Immigration Investor (EB-5) Pilot Program, civil surgeon designation, recovery of USCIS costs to process visas granted. Certain applications are also now applicable for fee reduction and new availability due to the final rule. Furthermore the final plan eliminates fees completely for armed forces members and veterans who wish to file an application for naturalization, application for certificates of citizenship, and requests for hearing on a decision in naturalization proceedings. Due the large amount of public remark over the final rule, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) allowed for a 45 day comment period after its release and received 225 comments. For further information about the public comments or the details of the final rule visit USCIS and the Federal Registrar.

MVP LAW GROUP – Q&A Forum, October 1st, 2010

October 1, 2010

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
What is the grace period on H-1B extension? I reside in California, my current H-1B visa expires on 9/25/2010 and I’ve filed for an extension on 9/7/2010. Got certified mail receipt for it. I was told by my lawyer that I have 240 days grace period when an extension application is pending. I need to have some sort of documentation proof on this fact for my employer. Is there anyway I can obtain it?

Answer #1
Under regulation 8 C.F.R. §274a.12(b)(20), a person lawfully employed under A-3, E-1,E-2,E-3,G-5,H-1B, H-2A/B, H-3, I, J-1, L-1, O-1/O-2, P-1/P-2/P-3, R or TN status who timely files an application for extension consistent with 8 C.F.R. §214.1, is automatically given 240 days from date of expiration. This extension does not apply to persons seeking a change of status. During 240 days, there is no INA 245(c) bar to adjustment of status.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I got my I-140 petition approved. Next step is to apply for AOS. What kind of document I need to have for AOS application?

Answer #2
In order to apply for AOS, your priority date needs to be current, once your priority date is current, you will able to file the Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status to Permanent Resident along with the Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document. There are numerous background documents that will need to be submitted along with your petition, specifically, a sealed medical examination from a civil surgeon in your area, birth certificates, copies of federal tax returns, bank statements, and an employment verification letter, among other documents.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My name is mistakenly typed in the form I-129 submitted to USCIS. In that form only, in all other forms (including I-129 supplements) it has typed correctly. Name mistyped on I-129, so reflecting wrong name on I-797, what I need to do now?

Answer #3
If you believe that the mistake on your I-129 receipt notice (Form I-797) would cause severe issues down the road, you will need to contact the USCIS National Customer Service number (1-800-375-5283) and speak with an Agent to request that the mistake be corrected, so that your I-129 Approval notice (Form I-797) will provide the correct spelling of your name.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I have some questions to ask about immigration. I am currently on Stem Opt extension and I am a full time employee, my stem opt started on Jan. 15th 2010. I have worked for one client in May 2010 through a vendor and the vendor said they cannot run my payroll directly. I contacted one consultancy but I did not know they are not e-verified. The consultancy got the money from the vendor and they are not enrolling into e-verify now. I am not sure what will be the situation if the non-e-verified company runs my payroll. My current company will apply for my H1 this year. Please advise.

Answer #4
Your current company/present employer should be the one responsible for running your payroll, not the vendor nor the end client. From the information you have provided, it does not seem like you are a direct employee of the vendor or the end client, therefore the only entity responsible for running your payroll is your current company.


Question #5 – Diversity Lottery (DV)
Can I apply for DV now?

Answer #5
Applications for the DV 2012 random lottery will be accepted beginning Tuesday, October 5, 2010 through Wednesday, November 3, 2010. Paper entries will not be accepted, eligible participants may access the electronic Diversity Visa entry form (E-DV) to apply during this period. For more information relating to the DV 2010 random lottery, please refer to www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Regarding a change of job, is there a recommended wait time after the green card that I can change my employer. On the EAD there was a 6mth after which I could do this, but was wondering after the GC if there is any such thing. Appreciate your response.

Answer #6
Although the regulations are silent on this issue, we recommend that you wait at least six (6) months before changing your employer to avoid issues if you intend on applying for citizenship when you become eligible.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Is the H-1B quota still open? Do I still have time to file for an H-1B even though October 1, 2010 is right around the corner?

Answer #7
As of September 24, 2010, there were approximately 25,400 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and approximately 5,600 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to www.mvp.com.


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Is an approved I-765 any indication that the I-485 is getting close to approval and would eventually BE approved without a hitch or are they autonomous processes?

Answer #8
They are separate creatures. Therefore, to put it simply, an approved I-765 is not an indication that the I-485 is getting closer to being approved.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I need to file my H-1b as soon as possible, but I am scheduled to leave the country early next week. If I file and leave, will there be any complications? Please advise.

Answer #9
Pursuant to regulation 8 C.F.R. 214.2(h)(15)(i), a person must be in the U.S. when an extension is filed, but may travel abroad while an extension is pending. If the beneficiary is required to travel while the extension is pending, the approval can be sent via cable (or through the PIMS system) to the appropriate consular post upon the Petitioner’s request. We recommend that if you have a pending extension with the USCIS, you do not travel outside of the U.S. unless it is an emergency.


Question #10 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My AP expires today and since i just came back from INDIA, i dont see any travel need for quite some time now hence i am not applying for extension of AP. Is that OK? Or do we need to always apply it before the current one expires. I think we can always apply only on needs basis and do it at a later stage. Will that be fine?

Answer #10
You do not need to apply for the AP prior to the expiration of the current AP. You can always apply at a later date.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, October 15, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

September 27, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, October 1st, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, October 1st, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

September 23, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of September 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 14 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 23 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 26 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

2010 Citizenship Day Naturalization Ceremonies

September 23, 2010

US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has partnered with the National Park Service (NPS) in recognition of Constitution and Citizenship Day on September 17. Over 9,000 candidates will be naturalized; candidates across twenty-two (22) national park sites will be naturalized between September 13 and September 24. Some of the highlights of this event include twenty-five (25) citizens being naturalized under the foot of General Grant’s Tree in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park in Three Rivers, California on Sept. 15, a ceremony at the Lincoln memorial on Sept. 22, 5,200 candidates being naturalized at Fenway Park and celebrations at the Grand Canyon.

The USCIS and the National Park Service (NPS) renewed their partnership to enhance the meaning and stature of citizenship ceremonies by holding naturalization ceremonies at NPS sites across the nation. Their agreement aims to introduce new citizens to the National Park System, which includes some of the nation’s most significant natural resources and cultural heritage sites according to the press release issued on September 13, 2010.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

September 13, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 17, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 17, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP LAW GROUP – Q&A Forum, September 3, 2010

September 3, 2010

Question #1 – Temporary Work Visas – H-1B & L1A/L1B Nonimmigrant Visas
I am a U.S. small business employer. I have read different articles about the new public law and its applicability to nonimmigrant visas, but I am somewhat confused based on what I have read. Does the new public law fee apply to me and my company?

Answer #1
Under Public law 111-230, Employers with 50 or more employees in the U.S., for which more than 50% of their workforce utilize H and L visas are subject to the new fee. Employers to which the Public law is applies will have to pay an additional fee of $2,000.00 for each H-1B filed, in addition to normal USCIS filing fees associated with the H-1B visa. Additionally, Employers are required to pay an additional fee of $2,250.00 for each L1 petition filed in addition to the USCIS filing fees already required. If your company employs less than 50 employees, you are not subject to the new fee. If you are a larger company and have 50 or more employees and have less than 50% of those employees on H1B/L1 visas, then you are not subject to the new fee.


Question #2 – Temporary Work Visas – OPT/F1 to H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I am currently on OPT and my 12 months of OPT expired yesterday and I essentially wanted to apply for my H1B before that. When I spoke earlier to my hr manager, she stated that once my labor certification for H1B petition was cleared, I would not have to worry about the dates or me going out of status.

Answer #2
Most importantly, if you have not filed for your H-1B petition at this point, you must STOP working, as you do not have authorization from the USCIS to work. You have a grace period after your OPT expires to either leave the country or file a petition to change status. If your employer is interested in filing for your H-1B nonimmigrant visa, I would recommend that they do so immediately as H-1B visas are still available under the FY2011 Cap. Regardless of whether or not you have a labor certification cleared, you cannot continue working and must immediately make plans to either depart the U.S. or file for a change of status.


Question #3 – Student Visa – F1
I am a Chinese citizen and I would like for my nephew to obtain a college education in the United States. Please let me know what I need to do? Thank you.

Answer #3
Please visit the following website as it will provide the steps for how your nephew can get his F1 visa to come to the U.S. for school. The first step for a prospective nonimmigrant student is being accepted for enrollment in an established school which is SEVP certified. There is a list of SEVP certified schools on the website listed above. Therefore, as his first step, your nephew must first apply for enrollment at a college of his choice which is listed on the SEVP certified list. Once he has been accepted by that SEVP certified school, he will then need to apply for his F1 student visa. All of the steps for obtaining such status are available on the website listed above, and additional information can be found on this
website
.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visas – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Do non-profits come under the same category as far as H1B is concerned?

Answer #4
If you are the beneficiary of an H-1B nonimmigrant visa for a company that is a not-for-profit, and they have sufficient proof of their non-profit status, then any new H-1B nonimmigrant petition filed by that company is not subject to the annual H-1B nonimmigrant visa CAP. An H-1B petition for new employment can be filed at any time.


Question #5 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card – Marriage Based (K1)
What happens if my wife and I do not file to remove the conditions on her permanent residency?

Answer #5
If you do not apply to remove the conditions near the expiration of her two-year conditional period then the permanent residency automatically expires and she is subject to deportation and removal. To avoid this, within 90 days of the expiration of the conditional period, she must file Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence.


Question #6 –Temporary Work Visas – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I have vacation plans to go to Indonesia in the first week of October 2010. Can I file my H-1B extension petition prior to my departure from the U.S.?

Answer #6
You may file your H-1B extension prior to your departure; however, unless you upgrade your case to Premium Processing, your vacation plans will need to be delayed. When you have a case pending with the USCIS, you CANNOT leave the United States, as they will interpret it as abandonment of your pending case.


Question #7 – Naturalization/Citizenship
I’d like to become a U.S. Citizen, I have been a Green Card holder for the past 7 years, have no criminal background, but am worried about what is to be expected out of me during the citizenship test and interview. Can you provide me with some resources for help to ease my concerns?

Answer #7
As part of the Naturalization Test and Citizenship Awareness, Education, and Outreach Initiative, USCIS will host a Naturalization Information Session at George Washington, Law School - Lerner Hall, 2000 H Street NW, Rooms LL101-LL102 in Washington, DC, 20052 on September 10, 2010 from 6:00pm to 8:00pm to provide accurate information on eligibility requirements and steps to become a U.S. citizen. This event is part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to demystify the naturalization process for immigrants and is just one out of several USCIS hosted information sessions throughout the country. The sessions provide an overview of the naturalization process and detail the contents of the naturalization test, and raise awareness of free USCIS educational resources available for immigrants interested in pursuing U.S. citizenship.


Question #8 – Temporary Work Visas – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
What triggers H-1B employer site visits?

Answer #8
There are three ways in which H-1B employer site visits are triggered: (1) site visits conducted as part of a fraud inquiry; (2) site visits conducted as part of a Benefit Fraud Compliance Assessment; and (3) site visits conducted as part of an ASVVP Compliance Review.


Question #9 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card (AC-21)
I have an approved I-140 filed by my previous company and they also submitted my I-485 back in 2007. I have since moved onto employment with another company on my EAD and do not wish to go back to work for my former employer. What happens if my former employer cancels my approved I-140? Can I file an AC-21 Portability letter?

Answer #9
To answer your first question, if your former employer cancels your approved I-140, then you will have to start the Employment based green card process over from the beginning, unless you have another employment based preference category immigrant petition pending/approved or you filed an AC-21 portability request prior to the cancellation of the approved I-140.

You may be eligible to file an AC21 106(c) Portability Request if the new position/duties are the same or substantially similar to the position/duties listed in your Labor application certified by the DOL and your former employer hasn’t canceled your approved I-140.


Question #10 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Can I still file for an H-1B nonimmigrant visa, to begin work in the U.S. on October 1, 2010?

Answer #10
As of August 27, 2010, there were 30,100 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 7,000 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our website.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, September 17, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

August 31, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 3, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 3, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

Updated Service Center Processing Times

August 19, 2010

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on August 18, 2010 with processing dates as of June 30, 2010.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of the MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

REMINDER - Submit your questions

August 16, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 20, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 20, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

REMINDER - Submit your questions

August 2, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 6, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 6, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

REMINDER - Submit your questions

July 19, 2010

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, July 23, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the new debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 23, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

REMINDER - Submit your questions

July 6, 2010

MVP Law Group's first "Question & Answer" Forum was launched on Friday, June 25, 2010. Please click here to review the questions received and answers provided.

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the new debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please do not hesitate to contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 9, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

SPECIAL – Naturalization/Citizenship - Valid Until 8/31/2010

July 1, 2010

SPECIAL OFFER: $950 flat fee (no admin fee) for filing Form N-400 + One Hour of Individualized Review

*Additional $750.00 for Attorney to Attend Naturalization Interview

Our normal legal fees are $1000 + $150(admin fee) per application

Contact our office to apply for Naturalization/Citizenship.


DETAILS OF SPECIAL OFFER:

At MVP Law Group, we offer high quality legal services at cost efficient rates with an individualized hands-on approach for each and every client. Contact our office for your Naturalization needs. From the onset, you will receive individualized attention from the initial client meeting up until your Naturalization interview. We will discuss with you the advantages of U.S. Citizenship, the process and time frame for applying; provide you with study materials and when you’re ready, devote an hour of personal attention to help you prepare for your Naturalization interview.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

Question: What are some of the benefits of U.S. citizenship?
Answer: There are certain benefits to becoming a U.S. citizen, such as higher estate tax exemptions, federal job benefits, greater freedom of travel to other countries and most importantly, the right to vote. In addition there are certain federal grants and scholarships available only to U.S. citizens.

Question: What are the continuous residence and physical presence requirements for Naturalization?
Answer: The law generally requires that applicants for naturalization must have resided continuously in the United States during a period of 5 years before applying (3 years in the case of qualified spouses of U.S. citizens). Applicants are also generally required to have been physically present in the United States for at least half of that required period of time.

Question: What is the procedure for applying for Naturalization?
Answer: Once you have completed and submitted your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and you have had your fingerprints taken at a USCIS facility, you will receive an appointment for an interview. At your naturalization interview, you will be required to answer questions about your application and background. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

Question: What is the purpose of the Naturalization test?
Answer: The purpose of the test is to demonstrate that you are able to read, write, and speak basic English and that you have a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (also known as “civics”).

*Frequently Asked Questions were summarized from the USCIS.GOV website.

CONTACT MVP LAW GROUP for more information!

MVP Law Group launches "Q & A Forum"

June 21, 2010

MVP Law Group is excited to announce the launch of our “Q & A Forum.”

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the new debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please do not hesitate to contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our first “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, June 25, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

SPECIAL – Naturalization/Citizenship - Valid Until 8/31/2010

June 10, 2010

SPECIAL OFFER: $950 flat fee (no admin fee) for filing Form N-400 + One Hour of Individualized Review

*Additional $750.00 for Attorney to Attend Naturalization Interview

Our normal legal fees are $1000 + $150(admin fee) per application

Contact our office to apply for Naturalization/Citizenship


The required documents for applying for Naturalization are as follows:
1. Copy of Permanent Residence Card
2. Copy of Spouse/Parent - Certificate of Citizenship/Birth Certificate (if applicable)
3. Copy of complete passports, visa and I-94 card
4. Marriage certificate (if applicable)
5. Divorce decree or death certificate (if applicable)
6. Children’s Certificate of Citizenship (if applicable)
7. Two (2) colored passport style photographs for each applicant
8. Certified copies of federal income tax forms that you filed for the past five years
9. Application fee in the amount of $675.00 (Check made payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security- DO NOT ABBREVIATE)


DETAILS OF SPECIAL OFFER:

At MVP Law Group, we offer high quality legal services at cost efficient rates with an individualized hands-on approach for each and every client. Contact our office for your Naturalization needs. From the onset, you will receive individualized attention from the initial client meeting up until your Naturalization interview. We will discuss with you the advantages of U.S. Citizenship, the process and time frame for applying; provide you with study materials and when you’re ready, devote an hour of personal attention to help you prepare for your Naturalization interview.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

Question: What are some of the benefits of U.S. citizenship?
Answer: There are certain benefits to becoming a U.S. citizen, such as higher estate tax exemptions, federal job benefits, greater freedom of travel to other countries and most importantly, the right to vote. In addition there are certain federal grants and scholarships available only to U.S. citizens.

Question: What are the continuous residence and physical presence requirements for Naturalization?
Answer: The law generally requires that applicants for naturalization must have resided continuously in the United States during a period of 5 years before applying (3 years in the case of qualified spouses of U.S. citizens). Applicants are also generally required to have been physically present in the United States for at least half of that required period of time.

Question: What is the procedure for applying for Naturalization?
Answer: Once you have completed and submitted your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and you have had your fingerprints taken at a USCIS facility, you will receive an appointment for an interview. At your naturalization interview, you will be required to answer questions about your application and background. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

Question: What is the purpose of the Naturalization test?
Answer: The purpose of the test is to demonstrate that you are able to read, write, and speak basic English and that you have a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (also known as “civics”).

*Frequently Asked Questions were summarized from the USCIS.GOV website.

CONTACT MVP LAW GROUP for more information!

The Badger State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Wisconsin

April 28, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Wisconsin – The Badger State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Wisconsin’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Badger State.

Below, please find the highlights from Wisconsin:
 Immigrants made up 4.5% (or 252,150 people) of Wisconsin’s population in 2007.
 41.2% of immigrants (or 103,921 people) in Wisconsin were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 4.8% (or 268,879 people) and Asians 1.9% (or 106,431 people) of Wisconsinites in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $5.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $3.0 billion in Wisconsin in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Wisconsin, the state could lose $2.6 billion in expenditures, $1.2 billion in economic output, and approximately 14,579 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Wisconsin and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Badger State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Old Dominion State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Virginia

April 28, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Virginia – The Old Dominion State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Virginia’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Old Dominion State.

Below, please find the highlights from Virginia:
 Immigrants made up 10.3% (or 794,246 people) of Virginia’ population in 2007.
 43.8% of immigrants in Virginia were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 6.5% and Asians 4.8% of Virginians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $13.5 billion and Asian buying power totaled $14.7 billion in Virginia in 2009.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Virginia, the state could lose $11.2 billion in expenditures, $5.5 billion in economic output, and approximately 62,918 jobs.

For more data on their contributions to the Old Dominion State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Beehive State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Utah

April 28, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Utah – The Beehive State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Utah’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Beehive State.

Below, please find the highlights from Utah:
 Immigrants made up 8.2% (or 215,757 people) of Utah’s population in 2007.
 33.2% of immigrants (or 96,401 people) in Utah were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 11.6% (or 306,858 people) and Asians 2.0% (or 52,907 people) of Utahans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $5.8 billion and Asian buying power totaled $1.8 billion in Utah in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Utah, the state could lose $2.3 billion in expenditures, $1.0 billion in economic output, and approximately 14,219 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Utah and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Beehive State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Lone Star State – Texas’ Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Political and Economic Powerhouse

April 21, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Texas – The Lone Star State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Texas’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Lone Star State.

Below, please find the highlights from Texas:
 Immigrants made up 16.0% (or 3,828,904 people) of Texas’ population in 2007.
 30.9% of immigrants (or 1,185,001 people) in Texas were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 36.0% (or 8,605,577 people) and Asians 3.4% (or 812,749 people) of Texans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $175.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $33.5 billion in Texas in 2009.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Texas, the state could lose $69.3 billion in expenditures, $30.8 billion in economic output, and approximately 403,174 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Texas and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Lone Star State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Volunteer State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Tennessee

April 21, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Tennessee – The Volunteer State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Tennessee’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Volunteer State.

Below, please find the highlights from Tennessee:
 Immigrants made up 4.1% (or 249,552 people) of Tennessee’s population in 2007.
 31.2% of immigrants (or 77,896 people) in Tennessee were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 3.4% (or 209,328 people) and Asians 1.3% (or 80,037 people) of Tennesseans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $4.6 billion and Asian buying power totaled $3.2 billion in Tennessee in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Tennessee, the state could lose $3.8 billion in expenditures, $1.7 billion in economic output, and approximately 25,919 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Tennessee and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Volunteer State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Keystone State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Pennsylvania

April 21, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Pennsylvania – The Keystone State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Pennsylvania’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Keystone State.

Below, please find the highlights from Pennsylvania:
 Immigrants made up 5.4% (or 665,176 people) of Pennsylvania’s population in 2007.
 50.8% of immigrants (or 338,238 people) in Pennsylvania were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 4.5% (or 559,476 people) and Asians 2.4% (or 298,387 people) of Pennsylvanians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $11.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $11.3 billion in Pennsylvania in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Pennsylvania, the state could lose $5.3 billion in expenditures, $2.3 billion in economic output, and approximately 27,718 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Pennsylvania and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Keystone State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Palmetto State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in South Carolina

April 21, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

South Carolina – The Palmetto

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of South Carolina’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Palmetto State.

Below, please find the highlights from South Carolina:
 Immigrants made up 4.3% (or 190,014 people) of South Carolina’s population in 2007.
 35.1% of immigrants (or 66,603 people) in South Carolina were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 3.8% (or 167,493 people) and Asians 1.2% (or 52,893 people) of South Carolinians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $3.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $1.9 billion in South Carolina in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from South Carolina, the state could lose $1.8 billion in expenditures, $782.9 million in economic output, and approximately 12,059 jobs.

For more data on their contributions to the Palmetto State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Buckeye State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Ohio

April 14, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Ohio – The Buckeye State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Ohio’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Buckeye State.

Below, please find the highlights from Ohio:
 Immigrants made up 3.7% (or 419,443 people) of Ohio’s population in 2007.
 49.2% of immigrants (or 206,404 people) in Ohio were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 2.5% (or 286,673 people) and Asians 1.6% (or 183,471 people) of Ohioans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $6.1 billion and Asian buying power totaled $7.1 billion in Ohio in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Ohio, the state could lose $4.0 billion in expenditures, $1.8 billion in economic output, and approximately 25,019 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Ohio and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Buckeye State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Tar Heel State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in North Carolina

April 14, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

North Carolina – The Tar Heel State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of North Carolina’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Tar Heel State.

Below, please find the highlights from North Carolina:
 Immigrants made up 7% (or 629,947 people) of North Carolina’s population in 2007.
 28.9% of immigrants (or 182,104 people) in North Carolina were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 7.1% (or 643,333 people) and Asians 1.8% (or 163,099 people) of North Carolinians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $11.9 billion and Asian buying power totaled $5.9 billion in North Carolina in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from North Carolina, the state could lose $14.5 billion in expenditures, $6.4 billion in economic output, and approximately 101,414 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in North Carolina and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Tar Heel State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Garden State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in New Jersey

April 14, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

New Jersey – The Garden State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of New Jersey’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Garden State.

Below, please find the highlights from New Jersey:
 Immigrants made up 19.9% (or 1,731,202 people) of New Jersey’s population in 2007.
 51.2% of immigrants (or 886,921 people) in New Jersey were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 15.9% (or 1,381,061 people) and Asians 7.5% (or 651,444 people) of New Jerseyans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $35.6 billion and Asian buying power totaled $31.7 billion in New Jersey in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from New Jersey, the state could lose $24.2 billion in expenditures, $10.7 billion in economic output, and approximately 103,898 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in New Jersey and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Garden State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Empire State – New York’s Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Political and Economic Powerhouse

April 14, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

New York – The Empire State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of New York’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Empire State.

Below, please find the highlights from New York:
 Immigrants made up 21.8% (or 4,205,813 people) of New York’s population in 2007.
 52.3% of immigrants (or 2,198,838 people) in New York were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 16.4% (or 3,403,870 people) and Asians 6.9% (or 1,331,543 people) of New Yorkers in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $75.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $51.4 billion in New York in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from New York, the state could lose $28.7 billion in expenditures, $12.7 billion in economic output, and approximately 137,013 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in New York and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Empire State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Silver State– Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Nevada

April 7, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Nevada – The Silver State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Nevada’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Silver State.

Below, please find the highlights from Nevada:
 Immigrants made up 19.4% (or 497,821 people) of Nevada’s population in 2007.
 38.1% of immigrants (or 189,707 people) in Nevada were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 25.1% (or 643,910 people) and Asians 6.1% (or 156,488 people) of Nevadans in 2007.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Nevada, the state could lose $9.7 billion in expenditures, $4.3 billion in economic output, and approximately 45,533 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Nevada and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Silver State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Cornhusker State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Nebraska

April 7, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Nebraska – The Cornhusker State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Nebraska’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Cornhusker State.

Below, please find the highlights from Nebraska:
 Immigrants made up 5.6% (or 98,512 people) of Nebraska’s population in 2007.
 37.0% of immigrants (or 36,423 people) in Nebraska were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 7.5% (or 133,093 people) and Asians 1.4% (or 24,844 people) of Nebraskans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $2.8 billion and Asian buying power totaled $1.0 billion in Nebraska in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Nebraska, the state could lose $852.4 million in expenditures, $378.6 million in economic output, and approximately 5,400 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Nebraska and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Cornhusker State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The North Star State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Minnesota

April 7, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Minnesota – The North Star State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Minnesota’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the North Star State.

Below, please find the highlights from Minnesota:
 Immigrants made up 6.6% (or 345,001 people) of Minnesota’s population in 2007.
 42.5% of immigrants (or 146,595 people) in Minnesota were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 3.9% (or 202,707 people) and Asians 3.5% (or 181,917 people) of Minnesotans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $4.4 billion and Asian buying power totaled $5.3 billion in Minnesota in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Minnesota, the state could lose $4.4 billion in expenditures, $2.0 billion in economic output, and approximately 24,299 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Minnesota and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the North Star State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Great Lakes State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians in Michigan

April 7, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Michigan – The Great Lakes State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Michigan’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Great Lakes State.

Below, please find the highlights from Michigan:
 Immigrants made up 6.1% (or 609,457 people) of Michigan’s population in 2007.
 46.9% of immigrants (or 285,770 people) in Michigan were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 4.0% (or 402,873 people) and Asians 2.4% (or 241,724 people) of Michiganders in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $8.8 billion and Asian buying power totaled $9.2 billion in Michigan in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Michigan, the state could lose $3.8 billion in expenditures, $1.7billion in economic output, and approximately 20,339 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Michigan and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Great Lakes State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Old Line State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Maryland

March 31, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Maryland – The Old Line State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Maryland’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Old Line State.

Below, please find the highlights from Maryland:
 Immigrants made up 12.4% (or 694,590 people) of Maryland’s population in 2007.
 45.5% of immigrants (or 315,892 people) in Maryland were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 6.3% (or 353,956 people) and Asians 4.9% (or 275,299 people) of Marylanders in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $10.2 billion and Asian buying power totaled $12.0 billion in Maryland in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Maryland, the state could lose $15.3 billion in expenditures, $6.8 billion in economic output, and approximately 73,267 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Maryland and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Old Line State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Pine Tree State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in Maine

March 31, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Maine – The Pine Tree State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Maine’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Pine Tree State.

Below, please find the highlights from Maine:
 Immigrants made up 3.4% (or 44,464 people) of Maine’s population in 2007.
 52.4% of immigrants (or 23,288 people) in Maine were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 1.1% (or 14,489 people) and Asians 1.0% (or 13,172 people) of Mainers in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $363 million and Asian buying power totaled $303 million in Maine in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Maine, the state could lose $137 million in expenditures, $60.9 million in economic output, and approximately 1,080 jobs.

For more data on their contributions to the Pine Tree State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Pelican State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in Louisiana

March 31, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Louisiana – The Pelican State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Louisiana’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Pelican State.

Below, please find the highlights from Louisiana:
 Immigrants made up 3.3% (or 143,267 people) of Louisiana’s population in 2007.
 43.2% of immigrants (or 61,952 people) in Louisiana were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 3.1% (or 133,089 people) and Asians 1.4% (or 60,105 people) of Louisianans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $4.0 billion and Asian buying power totaled $2.2 billion in Louisiana in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Louisiana, the state could lose $947 million in expenditures, $421 million in economic output, and approximately 6,660 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Louisiana and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Pelican State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Hoosier State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in Indiana

March 31, 2010

As Washington D.C. talks of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC).

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Indiana – The Hoosier State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Indiana’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Hoosier State.

Below, please find the highlights from Indiana:
 Immigrants made up 4.2% (or 263,848 people) of Indiana’s population in 2007.
 36.5% of immigrants (or 96,401 people) in Indiana were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 4.9% (or 310,919 people) and Asians 1.3% (or 82,489 people) of Hoosiers in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $6.8 billion and Asian buying power totaled $3.1 billion in Indiana in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Indiana, the state could lose $2.8 billion in expenditures, $1.3 billion in economic output, and approximately 16,739 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Indiana and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Hoosier State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Prairie State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Illinois

March 24, 2010

As the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) National Day of Action is swiftly approaching on March 25, 2010, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC). The AILA National Day of Action is an opportunity to educate Members of Congress and their staff about the problems plaguing our immigration system so that they can be more effective in crafting, promoting and supporting legislative solutions.

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Illinois – The Prairie State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Illinois’ economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Prairie State.

Below, please find the highlights from Illinois:
 Immigrants made up 13.8% of Illinois’ population in 2007.
 43.7% of immigrants in Illinois were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 14.9% and Asians 4.3% of Illinoisans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $40.9 billion and Asian buying power totaled $22.5 billion in Illinois in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Illinois, the state could lose $25.6 billion in expenditures, $11.4 billion in economic output, and approximately 119,214 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Illinois and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Prairie State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Hawkeye State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Iowa

March 24, 2010

As the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) National Day of Action is swiftly approaching on March 25, 2010, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC). The AILA National Day of Action is an opportunity to educate Members of Congress and their staff about the problems plaguing our immigration system so that they can be more effective in crafting, promoting and supporting legislative solutions.

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Iowa – The Hawkeye State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Iowa’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Hawkeye State.

Below, please find the highlights from Iowa:
 Immigrants made up 3.9% (or 117,437 people) of Iowa’s population in 2007.
 34.5% of immigrants (or 40,473 people) in Iowa were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 4.0% (or 119,522 people) and Asians 1.6% (or 47,809 people) of Iowans in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $2.4 billion and Asian buying power totaled $1.7 billion in Iowa in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Iowa, the state could lose $1.4 billion in expenditures, $613.4 million in economic output, and approximately 8,819 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Iowa and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Hawkeye State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Peach State – Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are a Growing Economic and Political Force in Georgia

March 24, 2010

As the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) National Day of Action is swiftly approaching on March 25, 2010, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC). The AILA National Day of Action is an opportunity to educate Members of Congress and their staff about the problems plaguing our immigration system so that they can be more effective in crafting, promoting and supporting legislative solutions.

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Georgia – The Peach State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Georgia’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Peach State.

Below, please find the highlights from Georgia:
 Immigrants made up 9.1% (or 868,413 people) of Georgia’s population in 2007.
 32.6% of immigrants (or 283,201 people) in Georgia were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 7.6% (or 725,401 people) and Asians 2.8% (or 267,253 people) of Georgians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $15.1 billion and Asian buying power totaled $8.9 billion in Georgia in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Georgia, the state could lose $21.3 billion in expenditures, $9.5 billion in economic output, and approximately 132,460 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Georgia and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Peach State, view the IPC fact sheet in its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Sunshine State – Florida’s Immigrants and Latinos are a Political and Economic Powerhouse

March 24, 2010

As the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) National Day of Action is swiftly approaching on March 25, 2010, we thought that it would be an appropriate time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by research conducted through the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) of the American Immigration Counsel (AIC). The AILA National Day of Action is an opportunity to educate Members of Congress and their staff about the problems plaguing our immigration system so that they can be more effective in crafting, promoting and supporting legislative solutions.

The IPC has complied research on the Immigrant, Latino and Asian community for most of the states within our Nation. Every Wednesday, we will provide in our blog post, the highlights from the research conducted by the IPC.

Florida – The Sunshine State

The IPC has complied research which shows that Immigrants, Latinos and Asians are an essential part of Florida’s economy, labor force and tax base. Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. With the nation working towards economic recovery, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of the Sunshine State.

Below, please find the highlights from Florida:
 Immigrants made up 18.9% (or 3,440,918 people) of Florida’s population in 2007.
 45.6% of immigrants in Florida were naturalized U.S. Citizens in 2007 who are eligible to vote.
 Latinos accounted for 20.6% and Asians 2.2% (or 401,527 people) of Floridians in 2007.
 The purchasing power of Latinos totaled $101.3 billion and Asian buying power totaled $15.8 billion in Florida in 2008.
 If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Florida, the state could lose $43.9 billion in expenditures, $19.5 billion in economic output, and approximately 262,436 jobs.

There is no denying the contributions Immigrants, Latinos and Asians make in Florida and the important role they will play in the state’s political and economic future. For more data on their contributions to the Sunshine State, view the IPC fact sheetin its entirety.

Immigration Reform will not come until we as a Nation are fully aware of the problems plaguing the current system.

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy on U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

The Centennial State – The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in Colorado

March 17, 2010
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