Articles Posted in Immigration News

USCIS Offices Closed to the Public – Closure Extended until June 4th

USCIS announced on March 18th that they have suspended routine in-person services, they have now extended that public closure until at least June 4th. This step is being taken to slow the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19)! USCIS will continue to operate but without public personal contact. USCIS will provide very limited emergency services that require personal contact; you must contact the USCIS Contact Center for more information.

Please visit this page for more information: USCIS Offices Preparing to Reopen on June 4

USCIS has an online Electronic Reading Room with access to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requested documents. The Reading Room is really a Web-based searchable database of public requested FOIA documents; mixed with USCIS documents that the government decided may have a larger public demand. You can use pull-downs to choose different listed subjects and include any month/year date from January 2011 to the present. You can also type in your own keywords to search.

Please visit this page for more information: Electronic Reading Room

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USCIS announced on March 18th that they have suspended routine in-person services, they have now extended that public closure until at least June 4th. USCIS will continue to operate but without public personal contact. USCIS will provide very limited emergency services that require personal contact; you must contact the USCIS Contact Center for more information. I have also listed the different subjects and actions available online below:

  • Field Office Appointments and Rescheduling
  • Application Support Center Appointments and Rescheduling

USCIS Offices Closed to the Public – Closure Extended until May 3

USCIS announced on March 18th that they have suspended routine in-person services, they have now extended that public closure until at least May 3rd. This step is being taken to slow the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19)! USCIS will continue to operate but without public personal contact. USCIS will provide very limited emergency services that require personal contact; you must contact the USCIS Contact Center for more information.

Please visit this page for more information: USCIS Temporary Office Closure Extended until at least May 3

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), have made a temporary final rule change certain H-2A requirements! These temporary changes are to help U.S. agricultural employers avoid disruptions in lawful agricultural-related employment! DHS and USDA are working to protect the nation’s food supply chain and lessen impacts during this public health emergency.

*Under this temporary final rule, an H-2A petitioner with a valid temporary labor certification who is concerned that workers will be unable to enter the country due to travel restrictions can start employing certain foreign workers who are currently in H-2A status in the United States immediately after United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) receives the H-2A petition, but no earlier than the start date of employment listed on the petition. To take advantage of this time-limited change in regulatory requirements, the H-2A worker seeking to change employers must already be in the United States and in valid H-2A status.

For important details please read the USCIS News Release, “DHS and USDA Move to Protect American Farmers and Ensure Continued Flow of America’s Food Supply“.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is warning fiscal year (FY) 2021 H-1B cap-subject petitioners that there will be a delay in data entry and receipt notice generation! H-1B cap-subject filling will still start April 1st, but data entry and receipt notice generation will be delayed and not start until at least May 1st, at the earliest. These delays are due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic!

* Once USCIS begins data entry, we will complete intake processing in the order in which we received petitions at the service centers. Petitions will be stamped received on the date they arrive at the service center. Petitions, if otherwise properly filed, will retain the receipt date that corresponds with the date the petition is received at the service center.

For important details please read the USCIS Stakeholder Message, “USCIS Announces Delay in Data Entry and Receipt Notice Generation for FY 2021 H-1B Cap-Subject Petitions Due to the Coronavirus Pandemic“ (PDF)

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has recognized that there will be delays and other immigration related problems during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic! They have listed many different options available for nonimmigrants during this national crisis! DHS recognize that nonimmigrants may unexpectedly remain in the United States beyond their authorized period of stay due to COVID-19. Should this occur, the following options are available for nonimmigrants:

• Apply for an Extension.

• If You File in a Timely Manner.

The USCIS and the Department of Education have published an online guide entitled, “Welcome to the United States: A Guide for New Immigrants (PDF)” in 14 different languages. This guide contains information to help the newly settled immigrants into everyday life here in the United States.

 
The main subjects covered are:

  • Your Rights and Responsibilities as a Permanent Resident

The American Immigration Council (AIC) has released all fifty states and the District of Columbia, for a total of fifty-one updated state-by-state fact sheets highlighting immigration data and facts. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants in each state.

With national immigration policy being discussed, we thought that it would be a good time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this AIC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on three states at a time. This week we will highlight; Connecticut, Delaware and District of Columbia (D.C.)!

The AIC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. As our economy continues to grow, Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. As United States economic continues to grow, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

The American Immigration Council (AIC) has released all fifty states and the District of Columbia, for a total of fifty-one updated state-by-state fact sheets highlighting immigration data and facts. These fact sheets highlight the demographic and economic impact of Immigrants in each state.

With national immigration policy being discussed, we thought that it would be a good time to provide some statistics on the Immigrant population in the United States as provided by this AIC research. Once a week we will be posting a blog with information on three states at a time. This week we will highlight; Arkansas, California and Colorado!

The AIC has compiled research which shows that Immigrants are an essential part of each of these states’ economy, labor force and tax base. As our economy continues to grow, Immigrants and their children are a growing economic and political force as consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. As United States economic continues to grow, immigrants and their children will continue to play a key role in shaping the economic and political future of each of these states.

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