Articles Posted in Amendments to H-1B Petitions

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMERS, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, July 6th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, January 20th, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, December 9th, 2011. Act now and submit your questions!

Question #1 – Marriage Based Immigration – Conditional Permanent Resident

I would like to know the procedure for “removing conditions.” When can I file? I’m married to a U.S. Citizen and my conditional green card is set to expire in May of 2011.

Answer #1

In support of an H-1B petition, a petitioner must not only establish that the beneficiary is coming to the United States temporarily to work in a specialty occupation but the petitioner must also satisfy the requirement of being a U.S. employer by establishing that a valid employer-employee relationship exists between the U.S. employer and the beneficiary throughout the requested H-1B validity period. The Petitioner must also file an LCA specific to EACH location where the beneficiary will be working.

“United States employer,” is defined at C.F.R. 214.2(h)(4)(ii) as follows:

United States employer means a person, firm, corporation, contractor, or other association, or organization in the United States which:

The U.S. immigration system is constantly changing. At a recent stakeholders meeting, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced several upcoming changes to the Labor Certification and Labor Condition Application process.

Expect More PERM Audits

The DOL announced that with Backlog Elimination Centers (BECs) closing, the DOL will now be now focusing its resources on parts of the PERM regulations that were not focused on earlier, including audits and supervised recruitment. Since April 2007, Immigration attorneys have seen a spike in PERM audits by the DOL. It looks like Audits are going to be commonplace from now on. DOL announced that both targeted and random PERM audits will continue. The DOL stated that the 60 to 90 day timeframe discussed in the preamble to the PERM regulation is not binding and is irrelevant if there is an audit. Therefore, once a case has gone into audit, it will most likely not be adjudicated within the 60 to 90 timeframe.

As I had recently mentioned in another one of my other recent blog postings, the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) had reported that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) was going to resume premium processing of I-140 applications for certain individuals. Today, the USCIS released an update and fact sheet addressing this issue.

In its update, the USCIS confirms that on June 16, 2008 it will make available its Premium Processing Service for individuals who are on H-1B status and are reaching the end of their sixth year on H-1B and have I-140 petitions (Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker) filed on their behalf (in our previous report we had reported that USCIS officials were going to open up premium processing on July 16, 2008).

Under the Premium Processing Program, the USCIS guarantees that petitioners would get a response (i.e., approval, denial, request for additional evidence, etc.) within 15 calendar days. This is really good news for individuals running our of time on H-1B status as according to the American Competitiveness in the Twenty-first Century Act of 2000 (AC21), and H-1B nonimmigrant is permitted to extend their status for three years beyond the six year limit provided that the alien is the beneficiary of an approved I-140 petition and an employment-based preference visa is not available for that individual.

The H-1B , is an employment based non-immigrant visa, that enables United States employers to seek highly skilled foreigner workers from around the world to increase productivity and develop new innovations within their fields which ultimately helps the U.S. economy. In return, the U.S. remains at the forefront of technology among other nations of the world, and continues as a major competitor in all other fields. The system was designed to protect both U.S. and foreign workers by: (1) including labor certifications and attestations; (2) implementing costly filing fees; (3) requiring extensive background documentation/proof; and (4) conducting on-site employer investigations and continuous oversight by several federal agencies.

The H-1B program contains strong provisions to ensure that U.S. and foreign workers are protected. Employers must guarantee that the U.S. workers will not be adversely affected upon the hiring of an H-1B professional. A U.S. employer using the program must also guarantee that: (1) the foreign professional will not adversely affect the working conditions of U.S. colleagues; (2) U.S. colleagues will be given notice of the foreign professional’s presence among them; (3) there is no strike or lockout at the worksite; and (4) the position requires a professional in a specialty occupation and the intended employee has the required qualifications. Employers who fail to comply with the Department of Labor (“DOL”) regulations may become subject to investigation, civil and administrative penalties, payment of back wages, and disbarment from participation in key immigration programs.

To ensure that U.S. and foreign workers are protected, each employer must maintain an audit/public access file for each H-1B applicant it has acquired. It is important to keep the public access file separate from all other employee and business files. The employer is required to have a public inspection file and DOL is able to audit that inspection file as well as payroll records to make sure the foreign worker is/was being paid the wage stated in the application. Public access files must be maintained for a period of one year beyond the last date on which any H-1B nonimmigrant was employed under the labor condition application.

H-1B petitions filed on behalf of employees are generally filed for a specific job that has specific job duties. When there is a material change in the terms of an H-1B beneficiary’s employment, the petitioning employer is legally required to file a new H-1B petition or amend the original petition.

What is a material change?

A material change is a change to the H-1B beneficiary’s job that substantially changes the terms and conditions of the H-1B employee’s job. The following are examples of material changes to a job for H-1B purposes: