Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 11/1/14

November 18, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 11/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

*Current = 6 months or less

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (10/6/14), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 10/1/14

October 27, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 10/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (10/6/14), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 9/1/14

September 16, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 9/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (9/3/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14090840 (posted 9/8/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 8/1/14

August 7, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 8/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (8/4/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14080542 (posted 8/5/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 7/1/14

July 16, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 7/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (7/7/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14071544 (posted 7/15/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 6/1/14

June 12, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 6/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (6/3/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14060641 (posted 6/6/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 5/1/14

May 20, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 5/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (5/12/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14051541 (posted 5/15/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 4/1/14

April 28, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 4/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (4/10/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14042145 (posted 4/21/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 3/1/14

March 7, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 3/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (3/4/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14031044 (posted 3/10/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 2/1/14

February 18, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 2/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (2/13/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14021342 (posted 2/13/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 1/1/14

January 16, 2014

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 1/1/14.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

USCIS.gov, (1/13/14), AAO Processing Times

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 14011541 (posted 1/15/14)

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 11/1/13

December 17, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of 11/1/13.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13120601 (posted 12/6/13)

USCIS.gov, (8/12/13), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 10/1/13

October 8, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of October 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13100306 (posted 10/3/13)

USCIS.gov, (8/12/13), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 8/12/13

August 15, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 12, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13081246 (posted 8/12/13)

USCIS.gov, (8/12/13), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times - 7/2/13

July 12, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of July 2, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is current.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13071057 (posted 7/10/13)

USCIS.gov, (7/9/13), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

June 19, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of June 3, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 9 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.


Source of Information:

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13061560 (posted 6/15/13)

USCIS.gov, (6/12/13), AAO Processing Times

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

May 21, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of May 2, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 9 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

April 19, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of April 2, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 9 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

March 6, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 12 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

February 7, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of February 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 14 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

January 10, 2013

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of January 1, 2013.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is current; for an I-129 L1 Appeal is current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 7 months; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 19 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

December 12, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of December 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 8 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - current. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is now current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 21 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

November 16, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of November 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 9 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 10 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is now current; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 24 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

October 17, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of October 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 12 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 7 months; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 29 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

September 20, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of September 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 17 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 8 months; for an I-140 EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 31 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP "Immigration Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 17, 2012

August 13, 2012

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, DREAMers, priority dates, the monthly visa bulletin, adjustment applications, etc., please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 17, 2012. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

August 10, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 16 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 20 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 12 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 32 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times

May 4, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of May 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 18 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 21 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 34 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, April 13, 2012

April 13, 2012

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. Therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
I am an international student with F1- status and Associate degree that I obtained here in US. Am I qualified to change my status to h1B VISA?

Answer #1
Unfortunately, you are not, unless you possess qualifying work experience. To be eligible to obtain an H-1B visa, you must have a Bachelor’s degree in a Specialty Occupation field, and the position for which you are being sponsored must require at a minimum the attainment of a Bachelor’s degree in a specific specialty occupation field.


Question #2 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Is H-1B CAP moving faster or slower than this time last year? How many have been filed at this point?

Answer #2
Faster. According to the USCIS, H-1B petitions being filed subject to the CAP have doubled since this time last year. As of April 9, 2012, there were approximately 17,400 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas filed and 8,200 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas filed. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #3 – Family Based Immigration
Who is responsible for scheduling the Interview, my fiancé or the Consulate itself?

Answer #3
The Consulate is responsible for scheduling the Interview and will send you notice of the date and time of the scheduled interview.


Question #4 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
I filed I-485, am waiting for EAD, my H-1B expires in May 20, can I wait until first week of May to prepare and file the H-1B, in hopes of receiving my EAD in the meantime? I do not want to get any unlawful presence/status. Please advise.

Answer #4
As long as you timely file your H-1B extension, under regulation 8 C.F.R. §274a.12(b)(20), a person lawfully employed under A-3, E-1,E-2,E-3,G-5, H-1B, H-2A/B, H-3, I, J-1, L-1, O-1/O-2, P-1/P-2/P-3, R or TN status who timely files an application for extension consistent with 8 C.F.R. §214.1, is automatically given 240 days from the date of expiration. During 240 days, there is no INA 245(c) bar to adjustment of status. We recommend that you maintain H-1B status while your I-485 is pending as a safety net in case any problems arise in the adjudication of your I-485 petition.


Question #5 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
How long does it take for the USCIS to review an H1B case that has been returned by the Department of State? When can we contact USCIS to check on the status?

Answer #5
The USCIS has indicated that when cases are returned to them from the Department of State (DOS), those cases are reviewed and processed when time and resources allow. Accordingly, they are low priority in the eyes of the USCIS. Pursuant to the USCIS National Customer Service Center (1-800-375-5283), you may initiate a Service Request after waiting 180 days from the date your case is returned to the USCIS.


Question #6 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Is a Nurse Practitioner considered a Specialty Occupation? A doctor’s office has given me a job opportunity (I’m on OPT) and I wanted to make sure before I accept that this is doable?

Answer #6
If you have at least a Bachelor’s degree in a specific field and the position requires at least a Bachelor’s degree in a stated filed, then you may be eligible for the H-1B nonimmigrant visa. In the medical industry, most of these occupations require graduate school. This type of position also requires extensive skill, knowledge and experience.


Question #7 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
The May visa bulletin shows that priority dates went back to 2007 for my category, EB2, I’m from India. My priority date was August 2010. Please explain to me what “priority date becoming current” means?

Answer #7
In order for an individual to obtain an immigrant visa, a visa number must be available to you. This is referred to as the priority date being "current." The priority date is current if there is no backlog in the category, or if the priority date is on or before the date listed as current in the State Department's monthly Visa Bulletin. This Bulletin is accessible at www.travel.state.gov. If there is a backlog in the preference category in which you were filed in, this means, that you must wait until a visa becomes available, until your priority date becomes current. When your priority date becomes current, you may file the I-485 application, but until then, you must wait. If your priority date was after May 2, 2010, then you will have to wait.


Question #8 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I have a student on OPT currently working for my company. I need to apply for her H-1B under this CAP. Her OPT expires in August of 2012. Will she have to return home or will she be covered under the “CAP GAP”? I am not sure of eligibility requirements for H1B CAP GAP. Please assist.

Answer #8
H-1B petitions that are timely filed, on behalf of an eligible F-1 student, that request a change of status to H-1B on October 1 qualify for a cap-gap extension. Once a timely filing has been made, requesting a change of status to H-1B on October 1, the automatic cap-gap extension will begin and will continue until the H-1B petition adjudication process has been completed. Timely filed means filed within the H-1B acceptance period beginning April 1, 2012. The paperwork (LCA and I-129) must also reflect a beginning employment date of October 1, 2012 to be covered under the CAP GAP.


Question #9 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
We appealed a denial of an I-140 Immigrant Petition filed on behalf of one of our employees. How much longer can we expect to wait for a decision to be made?

Answer #9
According to the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO), Appeals filed under the EB2 preference category (Professionals with Advanced Degrees) are currently being reviewed within 23 months of filing the appeal. Appeals filed under the EB3 preference category (Skilled and Professional workers) are currently being reviewed within 36 months.


Question #10 – H-1B Nonimmigrant Work Visa
Can an H-1B applicant change employers during the visa process?

Answer #10
Yes, an H-1B applicant is free to change employers during the visa process, changing H-1B employers is considered an H-1B transfer, and that petition would not be counted against the CAP, unless they are changing from a CAP EXEMPT employer to an employer who is not CAP EXEMPT.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, April 27, 2012!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our H1B Visa Lawyer blog!

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 6, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 21 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

February 10, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of February 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

February 1, 2012

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of January 1, 2012.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 26 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

December 15, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of December 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 32 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

November 9, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of November 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 31 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS' processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

October 7, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of October 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 22 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 29 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 34 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, September 30th, 2011

September 30, 2011

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My priority date is current according to October Visa Bulletin. I want to apply for I-485, regarding my birth certificate – it is not available and as I understand it, I need to have a certified birth certificate in order to apply. Can I submit something else? Any suggestions?

Answer #1
A certified copy of an original Birth Certificate is requested (if you do not have an original BC, please obtain either a non-availability certificate or a re-issued BC), in addition, if your BC is not registered within a year of your birth, please obtain two birth affidavits.


Question #2 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
On F1/OPT, my employer filed an H-1B for me back in July, no decision yet. Am I covered under “cap gap”?

Answer #2
H-1B petitions that are timely filed, on behalf of an eligible F-1 student, that request a change of status to H-1B on October 1 qualify for a cap-gap extension. Once a timely filing has been made, requesting a change of status to H-1B on October 1, the automatic cap-gap extension will begin and will continue until the H-1B petition adjudication process has been completed. Timely filed means filed within the H-1B acceptance period beginning April 1, 2011. The paperwork (LCA and I-129) must also reflect a beginning employment date of October 1, 2011 to be covered under the CAP GAP.


Question #3 – Family Based Immigration – Green Card
What is the age limit on USC sponsoring foreign parent or foreign relative?

Answer #3
For parents of U.S. Citizens – the U.S. Citizen Petition must be at least 21 years of age. (Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens may immigrate to the United States in unlimited numbers. Currently, there is no annual limit or quota that applies to this category.)
For sisters and brothers of U.S. Citizens – the U.S. Citizen Petition must be at least 21 years of age. (Depending on the demand, these individuals will most likely have to wait in line, possibly for many years, prior to being able to obtain a green card.)


Question #4 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card (AC-21)
I have an approved I-140 filed by my previous company and they also submitted my I-485 back in 2007. I have since moved onto employment with another company on my EAD. Can I file AC21 Portability letter?

Answer #4
You may be eligible to file an AC21 106(c) Portability Request if the new position/duties are the same or substantially similar to the position/duties listed in your Labor application certified by the DOL.


Question #5 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
How many H-1B nonimmigrant visas remain for the H1B CAP?

Answer #5
The USCIS has not provided an updated on the receipt of H-1B CAP subject petitions since September 9, 2011. As of September 9, 2011, there were approximately 32,800 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 3,300 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2012 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our www.h1bvisalawyerblog.com.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
Has the suspension been lifted for the issuance of Prevailing wage determinations? I am hearing conflicting information on the internet – forums.

Answer #6
As of September 30, 2011 – More AILA members are beginning to receive PERM prevailing wage determinations for requests that were submitted in early July 2011 (OES based). Notice has not yet been provided by the DOL that the suspension has been lifted.

As of September 15, 2011 - DOL Liaison has received reports that AILA members are beginning to receive PERM prevailing wage determinations for requests that were submitted as recently as June 23, 2011.

As of September 9, 2011 - Of the approximately 3,500 H-2B wage redeterminations to be completed by the end of September, DOL has completed approximately 2,700. DOL expects to be current on H-2B redeterminations by the week of Sept 18, 2011. After H-2B redeterminations are current, a few employees will continue to work on “straggler” H-2B cases and all others who were working on redeterminations will be reassigned to work on new H-2B prevailing wage requests. DOL expects H-2B prevailing wage determinations to be current (regulatory 30 days) by mid-October. After H-2Bs are current, DOL will shift resources to focus on PERM prevailing wage requests. DOL commits to have PERM prevailing wage requests current (processed within 60 days of filing) by November 1. DOL commits to have H-1B prevailing wage determinations current by the second week of November. The aforementioned dates were said to be the “worse case scenario,” absent something catastrophic (e,g. hurricane) or other major event/change. DOL agreed that stakeholders would benefit from updates on progress made toward these processing targets, and would consider publishing an update on the status of prevailing wages at the end of September on the OFLC website. DOL repeated that it will not waive any of the regulatory requirements and did not provide any additional guidance on alternative avenues for PERM cases that are ripe for filing but for the lack of a prevailing wage determination.

As of August 25, 2011 - The Department of Labor (DOL) Liaison has received reports from members that PERM prevailing wage determinations are beginning to be received for requests submitted in early June 2011. Additionally, the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has been in discussions with other stakeholders on possible courses of action, including individual mandamus actions, if DOL does not resume issuing prevailing wage determinations promptly.

Original Update: The OFLC National Prevailing Wage Center is experiencing delays in processing prevailing wage determinations as it is currently working to reissue certain determinations to comply with a court order issued June 15, 2011 in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. A Notice of Proposed Rulemaking was published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2011, and a Final Rule was published on August 1. All Center resources are currently being utilized to comply with this court order. The processing of Prevailing Wage Determinations, redeterminations, and Center Director Reviews has been temporarily suspended. Processing will resume as soon as full compliance with the court order has been completed by OFLC.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I live in VA and my driver’s license is expiring. What do I need to do? My H1B extension is pending and I need to renew my license soon, like in three weeks! Any suggestions?

Answer #7
Information provided by the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles website - If you are authorized to be in the U.S. temporarily and have been issued a limited duration driver's license, the license cannot be renewed. A subsequent license will be processed as an original license. However, you will not be eligible to receive an original driver's license if your authorized stay in the U.S. is less than 30 days from the date you apply. Each time you apply for an original driver's license you must show two proofs of identity (one proof of identity if under age 19), one proof of legal presence and one proof of Virginia residency. Proof of your social security number (if you have been issued one) is required also. If you present a valid legal presence document without an expiration date, you will be issued a limited duration license that is valid for one year. This does not apply to a U.S. birth document since it does not contain an expiration date. Foreign applicants applying should present the following - USCIS form I-797 displaying applicant’s name (Depending on the purpose and nature of the form, the I-797 may not be accepted. The I-797 for an I-765 petition is not accepted); and an unexpired foreign passport with an Unexpired or expired U.S. visa and unexpired or expired I-94. You most certainly can upgrade your filing to Premium Processing.


Question #8 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
One of our consultants is nearing his 6th year on H-1B visa status, but he has an approved I-140 filed by a different company. Is it possible to use that approved I-140 to get a three year extension with our company.

Answer #8
Yes. Pursuant to AC21 law, an H-1B immigrant may extend his or her status beyond the 6 year limitation if a labor certification, I-140, or employment based adjustment of status application has been filed where 365 days or more have elapsed since the filing of the labor certification or I-140. Or, where the H-1B immigrant has an I-140 petition which has been approved under the employment based green card and the AOS/485 is pending due to the unavailability of visa numbers.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Similar question to #7. I live in MD and my driver’s license is expiring. My H1B extension is pending and I need to renew my license. Any suggestions?

Answer #9
Information provided by the Maryland Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicle Administration website - If you hold a Maryland Driver’s License with the “T” restriction indicating that your license is a Limited Term driver’s license, expiring on the date that your lawful status in the U. S. expires, you will be required to provide new or extended proof of your lawful status. You will be required to provide proof of a social security number (SSN) that can be verified by the Social Security Administration, or proof of ineligibility for an SSN. The name(s) on the actual Social Security Card or other acceptable document used to provide proof of a valid, verifiable SSN or proof of ineligibility MUST match the source document(s) used to provide proof of the applicants' Age and Identity and licensure if required. If you held a valid Maryland driver's license, permit or identification card prior to April 19, 2009, you may be eligible for a subsequent license, permit, or identification card without proof of lawful presence or social security number, but it will not be acceptable for official federal purposes. (1) Please check your renewal notice for any errors. (2) Present your renewal notice, expiring license, and fee in person to any one of the MVA locations. (3) Pass a vision screening (4) Present new lawful status documentation if your Maryland license is expiring due to the expiration of your lawful status. You most certainly can contact the MVA itself and ask if that facility would accept your I-129 receipt notice as proof of your pending extension or upgrade your filing to Premium Processing.


Question #10 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
We appealed a denial of I-140 Immigrant Petition filed on behalf of one of our employees. How much longer can we expect to wait for a decision to be made?

Answer #10
According to the Administrative Appeals Office, Appeals filed under the EB2 preference category (Professionals with Advanced Degrees) are currently being reviewed within 31 months of filing the appeal. Appeals filed under the EB3 preference category (Skilled and Professional workers) are currently being reviewed within 35 months.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, October 14th, 2011!

Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyer blog.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

August 9, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 21 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 31 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 35 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

July 14, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of July 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 20 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 23 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 32 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 34 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

May 4, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of May 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 18 months; for an I-129 L1 Appeal - 22 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 30 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 32 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

April 5, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of April 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 17 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 29 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 32 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 3, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of March 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 16 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 28 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 31 months.

**Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

February 10, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of February 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 27 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 30 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

January 6, 2011

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of January 1, 2011.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 26 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 29 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

December 6, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of December 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 25 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 28 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

MVP LAW GROUP – Immigration Q&A Forum, Friday, December 3rd, 2010

December 3, 2010

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.


Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Is the H1B CAP still available? If so, can I still file and get accepted before the cutoff?

Answer #1
As of November 26, 2010, there were approximately 14,600 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and approximately 1,600 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to www.mvplg.com.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration, Green Card – Labor Certification
We filed a labor application and it was approved for a software engineer. We have not received the certified labor application in the mail (approved several weeks ago) and wish to move to the next step, file the I-140. What can we do?

Answer #2
Generally, there are two options available to you; however, both are rather similar. The recommended route is to file the I-140 petition with a request that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) obtain the certified Labor from the Department of Labor (DOL) itself. The other option is to write a letter to the DOL notifying them that the USCIS will be requesting the certified Labor from them directly for purposes of filing the I-140 petition.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I am planning on traveling to Canada during the Winter Holidays. I have heard through various people that when I attempt to pass the border back to the US, Customs may change my I-94 expiration date. Is this true?

Answer #3
Although you may have a valid visa that was approved by the USCIS, the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) Officers operate under their own set of rules. If you have legitimate/bona fide paperwork evidencing your employment and a valid work visa or other proof of your eligibility to be in the US when you attempt to cross the border from Canada to the United States, the CBP Officer should stamp the new I-94 with the expiration date of your current valid visa.


Question #4 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My I-140 was denied and my employer has appealed the decision. My H1 is due to expire next May 2011 as I am currently in my 6th year. Can we apply for H1 extensions based on my pending I-140 appeal? If yes, for 3 years or for 1 year?

Answer #4
Under AC21, yes you may be eligible to file an H-1B extension beyond the six year period if you appealed the denied I-140 in a timely manner (before the deadline). An applicant is eligible to file for H-1B one-year extensions if they have a pending I-140 petition appeal at the Administration Appeals Office (AAO).


Question #5 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I have a US green card, but I came to India without filling re-entry permit form as due to recession time not getting jobs even in three months, can I fill from it on India?

Answer #5
If you have a US Green Card, you do not have the have a re-entry permit (the green card itself is your authorization to be in the US), you have the status of a Lawful Permanent Resident and may enter and exit the country based on your U.S. Green Card. Re-entry documents are requested by applicants when their Adjustment petitions (I-485) are pending with the USCIS. Therefore, once you obtain a U.S. Green Card, you are allowed to travel inside and outside the U.S. without having a re-entry permit (Advance Parole document).


Question #6 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I got my H1B approved in 2009. Recently I saw that my I-797C form, states that my "Valid from" is from10/1/2009 to 3/29/2012. This is strange, since most of my buddies have it till 9/29/2012. Is this an error. Can I legally stay till Sep, i.e. till H1B is renewed? Kindly help me as this is bothering me a lot. Thanks in advance.

Answer #6
The USCIS can decide the date of the expiration of your H-1B visa status on their own. You may request an end date, but the USCIS will give you the date they wish. However, it could have been a typo/misunderstanding, therefore, you can contact the USCIS National Customer Service at 1-800-375-5283 and make a service request so that your case will be re-opened and reviewed to determine if the expiration date is correct or needs to be changed. Additionally, if a Work Order/Purchase order was included in your petition to the USCIS, they may have relied solely upon the end date of the work order/purchase order. These are issues you may wish to investigate before contacting the National Customer Service number.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Are your fees included in the fees to go to USCIS for filing an H-1B petition?

Answer #7
No, our legal fees are separate and distinct from the filing fees paid to the USCIS for the processing of the H-1B petition. The USCIS filing fees have increased as of November 23, 2010, please see below:

USCIS filing fees:
$325 for Form I-129
$750/$1500 for Form I-129DC (depends upon amount of employees of company)
$500 for Fraud Fee
$1225 for Premium Processing (entirely OPTIONAL)
$2000 new fee ONLY if employer has over 50 employees with over 50% of them on a nonimmigrant visa (H or L)


Question #8 – Family Based Immigration
My Grandfather (Dad's Dad) was a US citizen and he had filed an I 130 petition (Immigrant petition for relative, fiancé, or orphan) for my dad in Feb 2007. Unfortunately, my grandfather passed away this April. My dad's sisters are US citizens and they are willing to take over the case, if we can transfer the petition. I would like to know if there anything that can be done with this petition now? Or is it a closed chapter?

Answer #8
Under regulation 8 C.F.R. § 205.1(a)(3)(i)(C)(2), an I-130 petition is automatically revoked upon the death of the petitioner, unless:
USCIS determines, as a matter of discretion exercised for humanitarian reasons in light of the facts of a particular case, that it is inappropriate to revoke the approval of the petition. USCIS may make this determination only if the principal beneficiary of the visa petition asks for reinstatement of the approval of the petition and establishes that a person related to the principal beneficiary in one of the ways described in section 213A(f)(5)(B) of the Act is willing and able to file an affidavit of support under 8 C.F.R. part 213a as a substitute sponsor.

Only a spouse, parent, mother in law, father in law, sibling, child, son, daughter, son in law, daughter in law, brother in law, sister in law, grandparent, grandchild or legal guardian of the principal beneficiary is eligible to be a substitute sponsor. A substitute sponsor must also be a U.S. Citizen/national or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR), be at least 18 years of age, be domiciled (live) in the U.S. and meet all of the financial requirements of a sponsor.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
For a part time H-1B worker, what is the minimum number of hours per week and days per week of work required to be eligible for maintaining the part-time H1B visa status?

Answer #9
40 hours + per week would be considered a full time employee, therefore, anything less than 40 hours per week would be considered part-time. The regulations do not provide a minimum number of hours per week or days per week to be considered a part time H-1B worker. The I-129 petition and certified LCA must cover the jurisdiction of employment, hours per week and pay per hour. If the position becomes full time, an amended H-1B petition would need to be filed with the USCIS


Question #10 – Family Based Immigration
I am a US Citizen. I have a sister that lives in Antwerp, Belgium. I would like for my sister to have a Green Card and she can live with me in the US. With my sister case she is married and her husband is a Belgium Citizen. All I know is I would like my sister to come to the United States and obtain a Green Card. I would like to sponsor or bring my sister to come to the United States. I know that if I would like to sponsor my sister I need to file Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, and Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. I was wondering is there any better approach for my sister come to the US and what would you recommend me to do. Thank you for your time and I hope to hear from you soon.

Answer #10
In order to sponsor an applicant for lawful permanent residency, a sponsoring relative must provide evidence of the following: They are a United States citizen or a Lawful Permanent Resident of the U.S.; they can support the dependent relative at 125% above the mandated poverty line; and they must also establish proof of their relationship to the dependent relative. If you are a U.S. Citizen, then the family fourth preference category is what you would file under.
A sponsoring relative should first submit an immigrant visa petition, (Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative). This form should be accompanied by proof of the relationship between the sponsoring relative and the dependent foreign applicant, along with the Affidavit of Support (AOS) and then the I-485 petition once the underlying I-130 petition has been approved.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, December 17th, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

November 11, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of November 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 15 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 27 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

USCIS Issues Two Precedent Appeals Decisions

November 3, 2010

An announcement on October 20 from US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) revealed that two decisions by the USCIS Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) are now binding precedent, also known as law. The decisions made by the AAO are a joint collaboration between the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the US Department of Justice (DOJ). DHS and the Attorney General must agree that a particular immigration appeals case is grounds for establishing a universal rule that would apply to all future cases before it becomes an AAO precedent decision. The two binding precedents created state an applicant’s petition must first be considered “valid” before the validity can be considered if the applicant moves to a new job and spells out the definition of an “American firm or corporation.”

In first case, Matter of AL WAZZAN, the applicant asked for adjustment of status to permanent residence even though the applicant never provided documentation supporting his eligibility for a permanent residence visa. After two of the applicant’s original Form I-140 visa petitions were denied, the applicant claimed he had an offer for other employment and wished to readjust his status. The applicant argued that he should be allowed status adjustment due to the fact his application has been pending for more than 180 days from the time it was ruled upon. The underlying problem found in the applicant’s case that the AAO decided to create a binding precedent for is Section 245(a) of the Act which “requires the adjustment applicant to have an ‘approved’ petition.”After reviewing the case, AAO found that the applicant’s assertions were not convincing enough to allow for his adjustment of status. Even though AC21 states that a petition shall remain valid even if unadjudicated for 180 days if the applicant changes to a new job or employer in the same or similar field, the applicant in this case did not have a “valid” petition to begin with for the legislation to be effective.

In the second case, Matter of CHAWATHE, the Acting District Director denied the applicant’s application to preserve residence for naturalization purposes. The overlying question in this case was whether a publicly traded corporation could be considered an “American firm or corporation.” After reviewing the case, AAO found that the previous statement may be deemed true under Section 316(b) of the Act, only if the applicant proves that the corporation is incorporated in the US and that the corporation’s stock is strictly within US markets. An applicant who has filed a Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes does not need to be physically in the country for the required two and half years of residency as long as the employer is an “American firm or corporation.” The director determined that in this case, the applicant failed to prove ChevronTexaco Corporation, his employer, was an “American firm or corporation.” The applicant argued that the employer was incorporated in the state of Delaware and that the company he worked for overseas is considered a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco. Although the company was incorporated in Delaware, AAO asserts that an applicant must also establish 50% of the company is owned by US citizens, which the applicant in this case did not. However, incorporation doesn’t necessarily determine if a company is an “American firm or corporation.” Under the evidence submitted, AAO found that ChevronTexaco is in fact an incorporation of the US and Saudi Arabia Texaco, and that the company the applicant went to go work for is a legitimate subsidiary of the company. In conclusion, AAO found ChevronTexaco Corporation in fact meets the definition of an “American corporation” and the applicants appeal was sustained.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

October 6, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of October 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 14 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 23 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 26 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

September 23, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of September 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 14 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 23 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 26 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

August 11, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 25 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

July 2, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of July 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 12 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 25 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

June 9, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on June 8, 2010 with processing dates as of May 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 24 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

April 16, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on April 15, 2010 with processing dates as of April 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 14 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 24 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 5, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on March 2, 2010 with processing dates as of March 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 24 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

February 18, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on February 17, 2010 with processing dates as of February 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 14 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 25 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 23 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

January 29, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on January 28, 2010 with processing dates as of January 4, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 23 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

January 5, 2010

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on December 31, 2009 with processing dates as of December 2, 2009

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 12 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 26 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

November 5, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on November 4, 2009 with processing dates as of November 1, 2009

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 27 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

USCIS Issues Information Collection on Form I-290B

October 7, 2009

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has extended information collection for Form I-290B, Notice of Appeal or Motion until November 30, 2009.

During this period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise Form I-290B.

Members of the public are encouraged to submit comments and/or suggestions to USCIS, especially comments regarding the estimated public burden and associated response time.

Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies should address one or more of the following four points:

(1) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility;

(2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used;

(3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and

(4) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses.

Continue reading "USCIS Issues Information Collection on Form I-290B" »

Updated Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

October 2, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released on October 1, 2009 with processing dates as of October 1, 2009

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 27 months. Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

April 13, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) released its time report on April 1, 2009 with updated processing times for all types of cases accepted by its Office.
If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your case.

Administrative Appeals Office

If your case is out-side of the normal range listed and you need assistance, feel free to contact our office.

Appeal of an Alien of Extraordinary Ability is rejected by Administrative Appeals Office

March 27, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) recently considered the merits of the petitioner’s appeal on a de novo basis. Accordingly, the appeal was rejected, subsequent motions were rejected and the petition will remain denied.

There were several procedural errors made in the adjudication of this petition. The employment based immigrant visa petition was denied by the Director of the Vermont Service Center (VSC) on August 3, 2004. The petitioner filed a subsequent appeal on September 8, 2004. The director declined to treat the late appeal as a motion and forwarded the matter to the AAO. On October 11, 2005, the AAO rejected the appeal as untimely without rendering a decision as to the merits of the case. On November 9, 2005, the petitioner filed a motion to reopen the AAO’s rejection of his appeal. On June 6, 2006, the director dismissed the motion rather than forwarding it to the AAO for consideration. On December 12, 2007, the petitioner filed a motion to report the director’s decision dismissing his prior motion. The director forwarded the motion to the AAO. Although the issuing director shall have jurisdiction over the motion, given the directors errors throughout the proceedings, the AAO decided that they would consider the merits of the case on a de novo basis.

The issue on appeal is whether the petitioner properly filed the appeal. In order to properly file an appeal, the regulations provide that the affected party must file the complete appeal within 30 days after service of the unfavorable decision. If the decision was mailed, the appeal must be filed within 33 days. The date of filing is not the date of mailing, but the date of actual receipt. According to the facts, the appeal was untimely filed. Although the appeal was untimely, it did meet the requirements of a motion to reopen. The regulations specifically provide that if an untimely appeal meets the requirements of a motion to reopen or a motion to reconsider, the appeal must be treated as a motion, and a decision must be made on the merits of the case. Thereafter, the AAO considered the case themselves due to the prior errors committed in this proceeding.

The Petitioner filed an employment based immigrant visa petition on behalf of an alien with extraordinary ability, a Chinese Opera artist. To be eligible to qualify for the visa, the regulation provides that an alien have extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, business, or athletics which has been demonstrated by sustained national or international acclaim and whose achievements have been recognized in the field through extensive documentation. The term “extraordinary ability” means a level of expertise indicating that the individual is one of that small percentage who have risen to the very top of the field of endeavor. The regulation at 8 C.F.R. § 204.5(h)(3) indicates that an alien can establish sustained national or international acclaim through evidence of a one-time achievement (that is, a major, internally recognized award). Barring the alien’s receipt of such an award, the regulation outlines ten criteria, at least three of which must be satisfied for an alien to establish the sustained acclaim necessary to qualify as an alien of extraordinary ability. The AAO provided that in determining whether the petitioner meets a specific criterion, the evidence itself must be evaluated in terms of whether it is indicative of or consistent with sustained national or international acclaim.

Upon review of the petition, the AAO considered the evidence submitted by the petitioner for nine of the ten criteria. After a thorough review of each piece of evidence, the AAO ultimately denied the appeal. There were various problems with this petition. All documents that were submitted for review along with their English translations were insufficient. The translated English documents were not certified as required by the regulations, and as such the AAO could not afford the documents any weight in its evaluation of the evidence. Additionally, other evidence tended to show that the alien performed locally rather than nationally or internationally, and that many competitions he entered were restricted to the youth. In addition, the published material submitted about the alien was not sufficient as the materials were not specifically about the alien, and there was no evidence presented that the publications constituted major media. The petitioner also submitted several letters of recommendation regarding his talent and expertise in the field. The AAO responded to the letters by stating that talent in one’s field is not necessarily indicative of artistic contributions of major significance, and that although the alien earned the admiration of those providing letters, there was nothing to demonstrate that his work has had major significance in the field at large.

In conclusion, the petitioner failed to demonstrate receipt of a major, internationally recognized award, or that he meet at least three of the regulatory criteria. The burden of proof rested with the petitioner, and the petitioner was unable to sustain that burden. Accordingly, the AAO stated that even if the petitioner’s appeal and subsequent motions were not rejected, the petition would have remained denied.

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

March 24, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) released its time report on March 18, 2009 with updated processing times for all types of cases accepted by its Office.

If you filed an appeal, please review the link below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your case.

Administrative Appeals Office

If your case is out-side of the normal range listed and you need assistance, feel free to contact our office.

AAO approved EB-2 petition – Foreign degree found equivalent to U.S. “M.D.”

March 4, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) recently withdrew the decision of the Director, Texas Service Center (TSC) and approved the immigrant petition.

The Petitioner provides health care services. The Petitioner sought to employ the beneficiary permanently in the position of Family Practice Physician. The position on ETA Form 9089 listed the educational requirements for the position as “M.D.” which stands for “Doctor of Medicine.” The pertinent regulation states: “A United States baccalaureate degree or a foreign equivalent degree followed by at least five years of progressive experience in the specialty shall be considered the equivalent of a master’s degree. If a doctoral degree is customarily required by the specialty, the alien must have a United States (U.S.) doctorate or a foreign equivalent degree.” The beneficiary possesses a foreign five-year Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree from Islamia University Bahawalpur in Pakistan. Additionally the beneficiary possesses a Mississippi State Board of Licensure valid until June 30, 2009. Upon review of the petition, the director determined that the beneficiary did not qualify for classification as a member of the professions holding an advanced degree or satisfy the minimum level of education stated on Form ETA 9089. Specifically, the director determined that the beneficiary did not possess a U.S. “Medical degree” or foreign educational equivalent. Subsequently, the employment based visa immigrant petition was denied by the Director of the TSC.

The issue on appeal is whether the petitioner has demonstrated that the beneficiary qualifies for immigrant classification as an advanced degree professional pursuant to the regulations.

The AAO first reviewed the joint evaluation submitted by the Petitioner upon certification. The evaluation concluded that the beneficiary’s MBBS was the equivalent of a U.S. Doctor of Medicine. However, the evaluation did not cite any references, and was not supported by documentation supporting their conclusions. Thereafter, the AAO reviewed the Electronic Database for Global Education (EDGE) created by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO). (To read more about the AACRAO, please read the full decision located above) In a section related to the educational system in Pakistan, EDGE provided that an MBBS from Pakistan “represents the attainment of a level of education comparable to a first professional degree in medicine in the United States.” Accordingly, a first professional degree within the United States includes a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) The AAO ruled that the information contained in EDGE was consistent with and supported the evaluator’s conclusion that the alien beneficiary’s foreign education was equivalent to a medical degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States.

Accordingly, the burden rested with the petitioner, and the petitioner was able to sustain his burden. The petition was thereafter approved.

The MVP Law Group recommends that employers submit accurate and credible evaluations on behalf of all alien beneficiaries when petitioning for nonimmigrant/immigrant employment based visa petitions.

AAO approved EB-2 petition - Foreign degree found equivalent to U.S. "M.D."

January 16, 2009

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) recently withdrew the decision of the Director, Texas Service Center (TSC) and approved the employment based immigrant petition.

The Petitioner is a hospital. The Petitioner sought to employ the beneficiary permanently in the position of Interventional Radiologist. The position on ETA Form 9089 listed the educational requirements for the position as “M.D.” which stands for “Doctor of Medicine.” The pertinent regulation states: “A United States baccalaureate degree or a foreign equivalent degree followed by at least five years of progressive experience in the specialty shall be considered the equivalent of a master’s degree. If a doctoral degree is customarily required by the specialty, the alien must have a United States doctorate or a foreign equivalent degree.” The beneficiary possesses a foreign five-year Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree from the University of Poona in India. Upon review of the petition, the director determined that the beneficiary did not satisfy the minimum level of education stated on Form ETA 9089. Subsequently, the employment based visa immigrant petition was denied by the Director of the TSC.

The issue on appeal is whether the petitioner has demonstrated that the beneficiary qualifies for immigrant classification as an advanced degree professional pursuant to the regulations. On appeal, counsel for the employer submitted a cover letter and two new evaluations of the alien beneficiary’s credentials.

Upon review by the AAO, when determining whether a beneficiary is eligible for a preference immigrant visa, USCIS may not ignore a term of the labor certification, nor may it impose additional requirements. Therefore, USCIS’s interpretation of the job’s requirements, as stated on the labor certification must involve reading and applying the plain language of the ETA form 9089. As stated above, two new credential evaluations were submitted for review by the AAO. The first credential evaluation from Megan Mittelstaedt of the Foundation for International Services, Inc. equated the beneficiary’s degrees to that of a U.S. Doctor of Medicine degree. Ms. Mittelstaedt indicated that she relied upon the P.I.E.R. Workshop Report on South Asia, a publication prepared by AACRAO. (To read more about AACRAO, please read the decision located above.) Specifically, the credential evaluation provided that an MBBS from India “represents the attainment of a level of education comparable to a first professional degree in medicine in the United States.” Accordingly, a first professional degree within the United States includes a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.). The second credential evaluation was prepared by Dr. Keith Harrow of Silvergate Evaluations, Inc, and he also found that the beneficiary’s foreign degrees equated to a U.S. Doctor of Medicine degree. The credential evaluations support a conclusion that the alien beneficiary’s foreign education is equivalent to a medical degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States.

Accordingly, the burden rested with the petitioner, and the petitioner was able to sustain his burden. The petition was thereafter approved.