Posted On: August 31, 2010

UPDATE: H-1B FY2011 CAP COUNT

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has updated the count of H-1B petitions received and counted towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 27, 2010, 34,900 H-1B Regular CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 27, 2010, 13,000 H-1B Masters Degree CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 20,000 cap.

USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.

Stay posted to MVP Law Group for future FY2011 H-1B Cap updates!

Posted On: August 31, 2010

REMINDER - Submit your questions

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, September 3, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, September 3, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

Posted On: August 24, 2010

LATEST UPDATE: H-1B FY2011 CAP COUNT

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has updated the count of H-1B petitions received and counted towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 20, 2010, 33,900 H-1B Regular CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 20, 2010, 12,600 H-1B Masters Degree CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 20,000 cap.

USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.

Stay posted to MVP Law Group for future FY2011 H-1B Cap updates!

Posted On: August 20, 2010

MVP LAW GROUP – Q&A Forum, August 20, 2010

Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Can more than one (1) employer file a temporary (part-time) H1B visa application on my behalf at the same time? For a part time H1B worker, what is the minimum number of hours per week and days per week of work required to be eligible for maintaining the part-time H1B visa status?

Answer #1
Simply put, yes more than one employer can file a temporary part-time H-1B visa application for you during the same time period, as long as a certified LCA covering the jurisdiction of employment is obtained and the I-129 petition and additional supporting documentation reflects this part-time period. 40 hours per week would be considered a full time employee, therefore, anything less than 40 hours per week would be considered part-time.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
We have traveled to India about 2 months back (in June). My husband got a job transfer to India, and I resigned my job in the US to move here with my family. Since we are not there in the US, do you know if the green cards will go back to the USCIS? Or to my forwarding address in the US?

Answer #2
If you do intend to come back to the U.S. in the near future - they will not send your permanent resident cards to India, therefore, you will need to contact the USCIS and provide your new U.S. mailing address so that they will be sent there. The USCIS DOES NOT forward mail, so if you have your mail being forwarded, your cards will be returned to the USCIS and the USCIS case status will indicate that your cards have been returned as undeliverable until you can provide the USCIS with an updated U.S. mailing address for them to be re-sent.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
What is the minimum time period for which an H1B visa can be issued? Can it be less than 3 years? If yes, what is the minimum number of years for which my employer can sponsor me for an H1B visa?

Answer #3
The maximum time period that an H-1B visa can be issued for is three (3) years. Therefore, if your position does not require your placement for the entire three year period, your employer can request any time period from six (6) months to three (3) years.


Question #4 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
I just received my Green Card, what do I do now?

Answer #4
USCIS maintains a useful web page on the topic “Now That You Are A Permanent Resident.” It can be found at http://uscis.gov this is the USCIS home page, click on After a Green Card is Granted under the Green Card (Permanent Residence) heading. Then look to the right side and under More Information you will find valuable information on, among other topics, how not to lose your status as a permanent resident. Additionally, if you look to the left side under After a Green Card is Granted you will find numerous resources on different topics relating to your status as a Permanent Resident.


Question #5 – General – Social Security Card
How and when can I get a Social Security Card?

Answer #5
Generally, you may obtain a Social Security Card once you are legally authorized to work in the United States. Such authorization may be evidenced by receipt of an employment authorization card, an Alien Registration Card (Green Card), or receipt of temporary evidence of Green Card status (as established by presentation of an I-551 stamp in your passport). You will need to file an application for a Social Security Number in person at the Social Security Office. When filing this application at the Social Security Office, you should bring the following documents with you: your original birth certificate, passport, and employment authorization document, stamped passport or Green Card. Call 1-800-772-1213 for further information including the address of your local Social Security office, or visit their website at www.ssa.gov.


Question #6 – Employment Based Immigration - Green Card
My co-worker, a U.S. citizen worker showed me a brochure he receives from the SSA. It provides the credits he receives each year for the work he does. Does this apply to me, should I be receiving the brochure? Please advise what I need to do…

Answer #6
If you have a Social Security number, you should check to make sure you received credits under Social Security for any taxable work you did before you got your Green Card. Sometimes the Social Security Administration misplaces the records if you did not have a valid card, and this is the time to unscramble the records. Request a form SSA-7004, Request for Earnings and Benefit Estimate Statement, from Social Security to check these records. In fact, you should check your earnings statement every three to four years because errors more than four years old usually cannot be corrected.


Question #7 – Employment Based Immigration – Labor Certification
What is the difference between the old process for obtaining labor certification and the new PERM process?

Answer #7
In 2005, the Department of Labor (DOL) drastically changed the way it processes labor certification cases. The primary difference between the new process (referred to as “PERM”) and the old process is how recruitment-related documentation is handled. Previously, supporting documentation such as newspaper ads and other recruitment efforts, justification of the job requirements, prevailing wage determinations, etc., were submitted when the labor certification application was filed. Under PERM, while the same documentation must be prepared or assembled, it is kept by the employer and only submitted if and when requested by the DOL. The employer is required to retain this documentation for a period of five years. Under the previous regulations, there were two types of labor certifications: Reduction in Recruitment (RIR) (also known as “fast-track,” since these types of cases were given priority handling), and traditional or non–Reduction in Recruitment (non–RIR) cases. These two classifications have been done away with. However, occupations are now classified as “professional” or “nonprofessional” and each classification has different recruitment requirements.


Question #8 – Employment Based Immigration - Green Card
The Social Security card I have states that it is not valid for employment, but I just received my Green Card in the mail…can I continue to use my Social Security card or can they re-issue me a card without the restriction on it?

Answer #8
If you already have your Social Security card, but it is annotated indicating that it is not valid for employment without a USCIS employment authorization document, you should contact Social Security with your evidence of permanent resident status to have the restrictions removed.


Question #9 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My priority date is current. How long do I have to wait, we’ve already waited 5 years for our green cards. Do you suggest I call USCIS and make a service request to make sure they have everything and to speed up the issuance of my card??

Answer #9
Normally when priority dates become current according to the Visa Bulletin, it takes anywhere from 30-90 days to complete the processing of the I-485 before issuing the Green Card to the primary applicant and his/her derivatives, unless issues arise during the process.


Question #10 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
How many H1 nonimmigrant visas are left?

Answer #10
As of August 13, 2010, there were 35,300 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 7,700 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our website.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, September 3, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Posted On: August 19, 2010

Updated Service Center Processing Times

Processing Time reports for all of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Service Centers were released on August 18, 2010 with processing dates as of June 30, 2010.

If you filed a petition with one of the Service Centers, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

California Service Center
National Benefits Center
Nebraska Service Center
Texas Service Center
Vermont Service Center

If your petition is out-side of the normal range listed, contact USCIS. (1-800-375-5283)

If you are a client of the MVP Law Group and would like our assistance please contact our office.

Posted On: August 17, 2010

UPDATE: H-1B FY2011 CAP COUNT

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has updated the count of H-1B petitions received and counted towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 13, 2010, 29,700 H-1B Regular CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 13, 2010, 12,300 H-1B Masters Degree CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 20,000 cap.

USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.

Stay posted to MVP Law Group for future FY2011 H-1B Cap updates!

Posted On: August 16, 2010

REMINDER - Submit your questions

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 20, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 20, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!

Posted On: August 13, 2010

Round-Up of Immigration Related Legislation (June-July 2010)

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) complies an on-going list of all immigration-related bills introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate.

The following immigration-related bills were introduced into the House of Representatives and the Senate in June and July:

H.R.5528
Introduced by Rep. Carney (D-PA) on 06/15/10
Summary: Authorizes appropriations for enhancing the integrity of the United States against the threat of terrorism. Requires such funds to be used by the Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) to reimburse a state or political subdivision for expenses incurred when law enforcement officers or employees of such state or subdivision receive training to perform border security and immigration enforcement functions.

H.R.5595
Introduced by Rep. Ellison (D-MN) on 06/24/10
Summary: To amend section 214(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act to create, for an alien seeking to enter the United States as a nonimmigrant to care for a relative with a serious health condition, an exemption from the presumption that the alien is an immigrant.

S.3593
Introduced by Sen. Johanns (R-NE) on 07/15/10
Summary: A bill to require the Federal Government to pay the costs incurred by a State or local government in defending a State or local immigration law that survives a constitutional challenge by the Federal Government in Federal court.

H.R.5774
Introduced by Rep. Moran (R-KS) on 07/19/10
Summary: To require the Federal Government to pay the costs incurred by a State or local government in defending a State or local immigration law that survives a constitutional challenge by the Federal Government in Federal court.

Sanctuary City Prevention Act of 2010 (H.R.5840)
Introduced by Rep. Hunter (R-CA) on 07/22/10
Summary: Prohibits the Attorney General from expending funds in any lawsuit that seeks to invalidate those provisions of the Arizona Revised Statutes that were amended by Arizona Senate Bill 1070, as amended by Arizona House Bill 2162, until the Attorney General reports to Congress with a plan to enforce the immigration laws in any state or subdivision that has in effect any law, policy, or procedure contravening specified provisions of the Illegal Immigrant Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 that prohibit federal, state, or local government entities or officials, or persons or agencies from restricting certain immigration status-related communications with immigration or law enforcement personnel.

H.R.6018
Introduced by Rep. Castle (R-DE) on 07/30/10
Summary: To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act with respect to a country that denies or unreasonably delays accepting the country's nationals upon the request of the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Note: Each week hundreds of bills are introduced into the House and Senate, and the likelihood of any particular bill moving is usually very small.

Source: AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 10081073 (Posted 8/10/2010)

Posted On: August 12, 2010

September 2010 Visa Bulletin

The Department of State has released its latest Visa Bulletin.

Click here to view the September 2010 Visa Bulletin.

The September 2010 Visa Bulletin still shows employment based third preference (EB-3) visas as oversubscribed while the employment based second preference (EB-2) is current for all areas of chargeability except for China and India.

**The priority date is current if there is no backlog in the category, or if the priority date is on or before the date listed as current in the State Department's monthly Visa Bulletin.

Have you already applied in EB3, thinking about filing in EB2...if you are eligible, contact MVP Law Group.

Did you file in EB3 or EB2 and still waiting...and married to a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident?...you may be eligible to file a Family Based Immigrant Petition for faster processing.

Questions, contact MVP Law Group toll free at 1-800-447-0796.

Posted On: August 11, 2010

Administrative Appeals Office Processing Times

The Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) Processing Times were released with processing dates as of August 1, 2010.

If you filed an appeal, please review the links below to determine the applicable processing time associated with your particular case.

Administrative Appeals Office

The current processing time for an I-129 H-1B Appeal is 13 months. The current processing time for an I-140 EB2 Appeal for an Advanced Degree Professional is 24 months; for an I-140EB3 Appeal for a Skilled or Professional Worker is 25 months.

Most other cases are within USCIS's processing time goal of 6 months or less.

Posted On: August 10, 2010

LATEST UPDATE: H-1B FY2011 CAP COUNT

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has updated the count of H-1B petitions received and counted towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 6, 2010, 28,500 H-1B Regular CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 65,000 cap.

As of August 6, 2010, 11,900 H-1B Masters Degree CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 20,000 cap.

USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.

Stay posted to MVP Law Group for future FY2011 H-1B Cap updates!

Posted On: August 9, 2010

BALCA upholds denial of Labor Certification – Alien Worker did not meet the Employer’s Minimum Job Requirements

The Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals (BALCA) recently affirmed the final determination of a Certifying Officer (CO) denying labor certification for an alien worker for the position of “Supervisor."

The employer filed an application for labor certification which was accepted for processing on February 8, 2006. ETA Form 9089 indicated a requirement of thirty-two (32) months of experience in the job offered, and six (6) months of training as a certified welder. The CO issued an Audit Notification letter requesting evidence of recruitment and other required documentation and the employer complied. Thereafter the CO denied certification because the foreign worker did not meet the Employer’s minimum education, training and experience requirements, in violation of 20 C.F.R. §656.17(i). Specifically, the application required 6 months of training as a certified welder and the application did not show that the Alien had this training. The Employer responded by requesting reconsideration stating that the Alien had a total of 13 years of experience in construction work and gave specific dates of employment with other companies. The CO again denied certification on the same basis. The employer submitted another request for reconsideration stating that the Alien was the ONLY applicant to respond to recruitment and met every requirement of the posting including that of a certified welder. The CO issued a letter of reconsideration indicating that denial was proper because the Alien did not meet the minimum requirements and no further evidence was provided to support the employer’s claim that the Alien in fact had the 6 months of required training as a certified welder.

PERM Regulation 20 C.F.R. § 656.17(i)(1) controls and it provides that, “the job requirements, as described, must represent the employer’s actual minimum requirements for the job opportunity.”

In the instant case, Section H-4 of ETA Form 9089, required 6 months of training as a certified welder, but the employer failed to include in the foreign worker’s work experience job details that he received training in, or performed, any welding. Further, the employer failed to submit any evidence to support its claim that the beneficiary did in fact possess the welding experience required.

Accordingly, the Board affirmed the decision of the CO in denying labor certification.

Matter of Virginia Carolina Construction

Posted On: August 6, 2010

MVP LAW GROUP – Q&A Forum, August 6, 2010

Question #1 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
My H1b visa got approved in 2009 which was filed by my previous employer.I did not get chance to travel to USA and even my visa is not stampted. Now I am with other employer.
Can I transfer my H1b?

Answer #1
The safest option to utilize at this point given the facts as you have provided is to file a new H-1B petition. Transfers and Extensions do not apply in this scenario because you have never entered the U.S as an H-1B nonimmigrant. Once the petition is filed and approval received, you would need to attend the Consulate interview and if all goes well, you would be able to then travel to the US and after speaking with CBP, enter as an H-1B nonimmigrant visa holder.


Question #2 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card: Biometrics
I think the fingerprints that the USCIS has on file for my GC are set to expire soon. Should I take Info pass appointment to give them a new set of fingerprints?

Answer #2
As written on the I-797C, Notice of Action, in some types of cases USCIS requires biometrics. In such cases, USCIS will send you an appointment notice with a specific date, time and place for you to go to a USCIS Application Support Center (ASC) for biometrics processing. You must WAIT for that appointment notice and take it to your ASC appointment along with your photo identification.


Question #3 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa: Traveling
I am planning on traveling out of the US for a vacation; however, I heard from friends that I may not be able to obtain a new visa stamp for my recently approved I-129 and come back. Please advise.

Answer #3
If you MUST travel on H-1B status, we recommend that you have the following: at least two month’s worth of pay stubs, a copy of the approved H-1B petition, an original employment verification letter, the original approval notice, and any other documentation that would demonstrate compliance with the laws governing the H-1B program and the establishment of a bona fide job opportunity.


Question #4 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My child has received his Green Card and his birth date is wrong on the card. Do I need to fix this? How do I fix this?

Answer #4
You will need to file Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card. If you believe this was an administrative error on the part of the USCIS, you will need to check box d in Part 2, number 2 of the application. Along with the Form I-90 and accompanying filing fee of $290.00 plus $80.00 for biometrics, please attach the incorrect card and evidence of the correct information (original birth certificate; passport; previous approval notices, etc). You will need to submit the USCIS filing fees (made payable to the “U.S. Department of Homeland Security”) even though you believe it was an administrative error. If you send the form with accompanying documentation without the filing fees, the case will be returned until you provide those fees. If the USCIS agrees that the error was administrative in nature, they will issue a new card and return the filing fees.


Question #5 – Employment Based Immigration – Green Card
My spouse and child have received their Green Cards but I have not. I filed for our GCs through my employer. What do I need to do? Is there a problem with the processing of my case? Could my GC be denied? Please advise.

Answer #5
Based on the small amount of information provided, it seems like there may just be an issue with the issuance/mailing of your Green Card. Your husband and child would not have received their Green Card if there was a pending issue with your case. From the information you provided, you are the primary applicant and your spouse and child are your derivatives. Therefore, the USCIS would not approve the I-485 Application to Adjust status for the derivatives without first approving it for the primary applicant. Follow up with the USCIS after 30 days from the date your spouse and child received their Green Cards by calling 1-800-375-5283.


Question #6 - Employment Based Immigration – Green Card - EAD Renewal
I filed for my EAD renewal back in May 2010 with the NSC and it is still pending. My current EAD expires next week. What are my options moving forward - can I expedite the EAD renewal process since my card is expiring next week, can I continue to work with the receipt notice?

Answer #6
To my knowledge you normally cannot expedite an EAD renewal request; however, I have heard from my colleagues that after an EAD renewal has been pending for 75+ days at the NSC an Attorney may contact the Service Center directly to notify them of the situation. If you do not receive your EAD approval by the time your current EAD expires, you MUST WAIT and NOT WORK until your EAD is approved. You MAY NOT continue to work using the EAD receipt notice as the receipt is not evidence of an approval.

You may file an EAD renewal request up to 120 days in advance of the expiration of your current EAD and should be aware of the Service Center processing times well in advance of filing so that you can obtain an approval of the EAD to continue working.


Question #7 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
What document determines how long I can stay in the United States: my visa, my I-94 card or the expiration of my current passport?

Answer #7
Short answer: The visa stamp issued by the U.S. State Department displayed in your passport allows you to enter the U.S. at a port of entry. The I-94 card issued by an Immigration Inspector at the port of entry is your admission ticket and displays the time period you are authorized to stay in the United States. If your I-94 card expires and you did not obtain an extension, and you remain in the U.S. without taking further action, this inaction will result in you accruing unlawful presence in the U.S.


Question #8 – Family Based Immigration: Marriage – K1 Fiancé Visa
My son is U.S. Citizen and would like to marry his Pakistani fiancé. Both boy and girl know each other over three years and have been engaged for 8 months already. Can my son file a petition for his fiancé? How long is it taking?

Answer #8
U.S. Citizens who are engaged to be married to a foreign national may petition the USCIS on behalf of their fiancé by way of the K-1 visa. To be eligible for this visa: (1) you must be legally able to marry; (2) the marriage must be a bona fide marriage with good intent; (3) you must be willing to marry within 90 days of the fiancé entering the United States; and (4) you must have met within two years of filing for the visa. The K-1 visa is valid for only one entry into the United States. Therefore, reentering with it is not possible. You also cannot renew a K-1 fiancé visa. Your son should first file a Petition for Alien Fiancé (Form I-130) with the USCIS. Once the petition is approved, the USCIS will forward the approved petition to the appropriate American consulate to interview the beneficiary. Once the beneficiary attends the consular interview and is approved for the visa, she may travel to the United States to marry your son. A petition for K-1 status is valid for four months from the date of USCIS action, and may only be revalidated by the consular officer. Currently, it is taking approximately 5 months to obtain approval for the Petition for Alien Fiancé.


Question #9 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
I was on H-1B status from 2006-2009 and now currently utilize my EAD. My sponsoring H-1B employer did not pay me what was listed in my LCA. Can I do anything now about this?

Answer #9
If your employer has not paid you in accordance with the certified LCA, then they are most likely in violation of the The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), The FLSA prescribes standards for the basic minimum wage and overtime pay which affects most private and public employment. It requires employers to pay covered employees who are not otherwise exempt at least the federal minimum wage and overtime pay of one-and-one-half-times the regular rate of pay. The Act is administered by the Employment Standards Administration's Wage and Hour Division within the U.S. Department of Labor.

You may wish to check out the following link regarding how to move forward when attempting to file suit to obtain any back payment of wages, etc.


Question #10 – Temporary Work Visa – H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa
Can you let me know how many visas remain under the H-1B Cap?

Answer #10
As of July 30, 2010, there were 37,700 H-1B Regular CAP subject nonimmigrant visas remaining and 8,400 H-1B Masters Exemption nonimmigrant visas remaining. USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn. For continuous FY2011 H-1B Cap updates, please refer to our website.


MVP Law Group would like to thank everyone who contributed a question or comment. We hope the information provided is helpful.

Our next “Immigration Q & A Forum” is scheduled for Friday, August 20, 2010! Please remember to submit your questions/comments on our h1bvisalawyerblog.

MVP Law Group, P.A. makes available the information and materials in this forum for informational purposes only. The information is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice or any contractual obligations. Further, the use of this site, and the sending or receipt of this information, does not create an attorney-client relationship between us. And, therefore, your communication with us through this forum will not be considered as privileged or confidential.

Posted On: August 5, 2010

Updated List: SEVP Approved Schools

The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) recently updated the list of Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) approved schools. The schools listed have all been certified to participate in the program.

The program allows foreign students interested in obtaining an education in the United States to complete a visa petition, pay the required fee, and attend a U.S. College or University.

Interested Foreign students: There is a process in obtaining a student visa, but it is not a difficult one. The student must first obtain Form I-20 from the U.S. College or University from which he/she intends to enroll, pay the required visa fee (Form I-901) and contact a local U.S. Consulate/Embassy to schedule an interview. The SEVP procedures differ among U.S. Consulates/Embassies; contact your U.S. Consulate/Embassy NOW to determine its particular procedure on applying for a visa before planning for the interview.

Interested Schools: There is a separate process to obtain F & M Certification. Authorized school officials must obtain and complete Form I-17. An overview of the SEVP Certification process can be found on the ICE website . If approved, the school will be certified and allowed to issue Form I-20 to qualifying foreign students.

If you need assistance or an explanation of the SEVP/student visa, please contact our office to schedule a consultation.

Posted On: August 4, 2010

UPDATE: H-1B FY2011 CAP COUNT

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has updated the count of H-1B petitions received and counted towards the 65,000 cap.

As of July 30, 2010, 27,300 H-1B Regular CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 65,000 cap.

As of July 30, 2010, 11,600 H-1B Masters Degree CAP subject non-immigrant visa petitions have been filed with the USCIS towards the 20,000 cap.

USCIS will continue to accept both cap-subject petitions and advanced degree petitions until a sufficient number of H-1B petitions have been received to reach the statutory limits, taking into account the fact that some of these petitions may be denied, revoked, or withdrawn.

Stay posted to MVP Law Group for future FY2011 H-1B Cap updates!

Posted On: August 2, 2010

REMINDER - Submit your questions

MVP "Q & A Forum" - This Friday, August 6, 2010

We wanted to find a new way to engage our reader base. Every other Friday, we will post the ten (10) best/most frequently asked questions received during the week from our h1bvisalawyerblog, Facebook, and Twitter readers. We will answer those questions and provide the Q&A on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

If you have a burning question, are seeking assistance with a difficult immigration related case, wish to discuss your views on Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AZ SB1070, or the debate focused on Ending Birthright Citizenship, please contact us by submitting your question/comment/viewpoint in our comment box provided on our H-1B Visa Lawyer Blog.

Our next “Q & A Forum” will take place this Friday, August 6, 2010. Act now and submit your questions!

THANK YOU!